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Recipe for or source for recipe for Landbrot

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renoles's picture
renoles

Recipe for or source for recipe for Landbrot

I spent last week in New Orleans (shameless plug: if you haven't been since the storm go...the city is bouncing back) and had the chance to visit the Crescent City Farmers Market. There was a man selling German breads and I bought a loaf of Landbrot. It's outstanding. It's got a very open crumb and a mildly sour taste. I've done a little searching and can't come up with a recipe. Any help? Any one bake a bread like this? Any help is much appreciated.

ostwestwin's picture
ostwestwin

is the German name for Country Bread. This one is the spelt version from Maggie Glezer's book. The French Country Bread from the British baker is more that, what I understand as a Landbrot. This Holsteiner Landbrot is a typical bread from Northern Germany - where I live. Unfortunately the crumb is broken. But the taste was great. I baked it again with a longer proof and the crumb was ok. Here a "Landbrot" from Country Breads around the world and here another version from Maggie Glezer's book and last but not least a Black Forest Country Bread

Typical for Germany are

Holsteiner Landbrot - Country bread from Holstein

 


 

and

Schwarzwälder Landbrot - Black Forest Country bread

 

 

 

 

Which one comes close to the one you liked? If you need some translation help, it would be my pleasure to help-

 

BROTKUNST's picture
BROTKUNST

What's in the Bread Spice (Brotgewuerz) that you mentioned ?

 

BROTKUNST

 

P.S. Living close to Luebeck ?

ostwestwin's picture
ostwestwin

there are different bread spice-mixtures in the German-speaking part of Europe:


Bavarian style bread spice contains coriander, caraway, fennel and aniseed.

Franconian style bread spice is a mixture of caraway and coriander.


The bread spice of South Tyrol is "Brotklee" =Blue-white clover, Blue-white trigonella, Blue fenugreek, Sweet trefoil, Curd herb, Blue melilot. You need this for "Vinschgauer Fladen" , flat bread with sourdough

And there are the free-style mixtures like coriander, caraway and fennel or caraway, coriander, anisiseed, fennel and cardamom.

I normally use only coriander and fennel, it's up to you and your taste. The only commonnes: all mixtures are ground

 

Ulrike aka ostwestwind

P.S. I live near Kiel , that's about 80 km away from Luebeck and the the famous marzipan ....

renoles's picture
renoles

My thanks to the both of you for the recipes. Ostwestwin - I glanced at the recipes. I proved to myself that my German is more rusty than I thought. I'll give them a closer look this afternoon and ask for help in translation then. I am kind of surprised that Landbrot and the country French style loaves are almost identical...it's a small world after all.

renoles's picture
renoles

After a serious lunch of barbecue (on someone elses tab) I've re-examined the recipes. Structure-wise it appears that the Schwarwalder landbrot is closest. The bread has a definitive tang and unless my German is just way off (which could well be) the rye amounts (Roggenmehl is rye flour, no?) might just be it. The bread spice additions are interesting...I might have to add in some coriander and caraway...

But - can I get some assistance in translating?  

I've also emailed the man selling the bread to ask where the recipe comes from.

ostwestwin's picture
ostwestwin

by mailing to ostwestwind [at] yahoo [dot] de 

 

You are welcome 

 

And yes Roggenmehl is rye flour  

renoles's picture
renoles

I think I got it...but I might be wrong too.

suelynn's picture
suelynn

I found this one.  
Landbrot

Leavening ingredients: half a teaspoon of brewer’s yeast, 3 tablespoons of water, 50 grams of type 0 flour, 1 tablespoon of milk.

Dough ingredients: 2 teaspoons of brewer’s yeast, 3.5 deciliters of water, 350 grams of rye flour, 100 grams of type 0 flour, 2 teaspoons of salt.

Leavening: dissolve the brewer’s yeast in lukewarm water and stir for 5 minutes. Add the flour and milk and blend. Cover with a cloth and let rise for 12-18 hours at room temperature.

Dough: dissolve the yeast in 2.5 deciliters of water and stir for 5 minutes. Put the two types of flour into a suitable bowl, make a well in the center and pour in the two leavening agents. Blend in enough flour to obtain a dense dough. Cover with a cloth and let rise for 12-18 hours. Add salt and the rest of the flour, then add the remaining water. The dough will be sticky. Kneed on a board for 10 minutes and let rest for 10 more minutes. Put the dough on a floured baking-pan and make a cross-shaped cut. Cover with a cloth and let rest for an additional 90 minutes. Bake in a hot over (180-200° C) for about 30 minutes…Guten appetit!

SueLynn