The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

FibraMent-D Baking Stone

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BROTKUNST's picture
BROTKUNST

FibraMent-D Baking Stone

Does anyone have experience with the FibraMent-D baking stones ?

 

BROTKUNST

fleur-de-liz's picture
fleur-de-liz

I have a FibraMent stone that I am very pleased with.  It's by far the thickest stone I have seen.  In addition, they are able to  custom cut (for a small additional fee) the stone to fit your specifications.   I have a 36" oven and was able to order a 15" x 24" stone that now allows me to bake more loaves at a time.  The stone also seems to retain heat for quite some time.

BROTKUNST's picture
BROTKUNST

Nice oven, fleur !

 

I ordered a 15x20" .... my intention is to try a baking stone on top in addition to the one that is used for the baking surface. The new stone will be my future baking surface.

 

I hope that the 50% thicker stone will be even better for the baking Pizza due to the improved heat retention.

 

I am looking forward to receiving the FibraMent Stone. Say, do you pre-heat any differently compared to a 'regular' stone ?

 

BROTKUNST

fleur-de-liz's picture
fleur-de-liz

Brotkunst:  From my observations, the Fibrament stone does seem to take a bit longer to pre-heat than my previous stone, but once warm, it stays hot for longer.  I also have used my old stone on top and I, must say, I don't notice much of a difference than when using the FibraMent alone. I would be interested in hearing whether you notice a difference using two stones.  When I use La Cloche, I have trouble fitting in the top stone (and it doesn't seem really necesssary).

I do love my oven.  Last summer I remodeled my kitchen and the splurge purchase was a 36" Wolf dual fuel range.  It was, in fact, the impetus to start baking bread.... and I've never looked back!

BROTKUNST's picture
BROTKUNST

The FibraMent has about 150% of the mass of the same size 'regular' baking stone. Considering that the FibraMent I ordered is also larger, I'd expect almost 60 min pre-heating. It's a better heat battery though ... You are right about the top stone and the cloche. However, when I use the Cloche and the ovenspring has taken place I pretty much introduce the drying phase - in which indeed the upper stone would have only a minor influence.

 

I have a layout to build a rectangular stainless cloche for my 15x20" stone ... since stainless is not quite the same as clay when it comes to heat retention, the upper stone may have a positive influence (as a second, upper heat battery) when I use this 'stainless cloche. The advantage of the stainless cloche is that it would cover the entire stone and could be just the correct hight to be lifted off with a top-stone in place.

 

BROTKUNST

susanfnp's picture
susanfnp

Are we the same person? Everything you said could have come right from my mouth, except I got my oven two summers ago.

Brotkunst, like I -- er, I mean fleur-de-liz -- said above, I love the Fibrament. However, from what I've seen of your bread, whatever you're doing now is working just fine.

Susanfnp

fleur-de-liz's picture
fleur-de-liz

Susan: I do love my oven and it really was the reason I started baking bread in the last year. I did some bread baking years ago (a la Tassajara), but it's been a long time. However, the Wolf range and the remodeled kitchen with island fueled the bread baking passion, and now I can't remember the last time I bought bread. Recently had some Panera bread at work and thought it was really quite bland..... Even when it's not as good as I hope, the homemade breads are really quite tasty. Liz

fleur-de-liz's picture
fleur-de-liz

A stainless steel cloche custom sized for a baking stone -- if you go into business, I'm ready to place an order!  Great idea!

Liz

BROTKUNST's picture
BROTKUNST

:) I'll let you know how it will turn out. I'll have to wait for my FibraMent to make sure that the dimensions are indeed 15x20" and not slighly different (after tempering). I got the design pretty much nailed down and have to get it then through fabrication.

 

By the way .... since we talk about useful tools: the Superpeel (superpeel.com) is really great. It's a kitchen essential to me when it comes to loading loaves and pizza on the hot stone.

 

BROTKUNST

fleur-de-liz's picture
fleur-de-liz

Yep, already have the Superpeel.  I think I am bread baking gadget junkie.  After mauling a pizza when trying to load it in the oven, I read about the Superpeel here and purchased it.  I've been very pleased and use it for bread as well as pizza loading.  It really works well.

Will be interested in hearing more about the stainless cloche prototype.

Thanks!

Liz

BROTKUNST's picture
BROTKUNST

Fleur, Susan ... any idea why the rough surface is the 'baking surface' ?

 

Obviously the other, smoother side is a bit smaller but the chamfer would work great for sealing and centering my stainless cloche (Otherwise I just have to implement a feature that makes the line-up of the stone and cloche snap-easy)

 

BROTKUNST

DrWeevil's picture
DrWeevil

Did you ever get an answer on this?  I had that question as well; i'm sure others do too.


Thanks!

Maeve's picture
Maeve

I bought my fibrament stone years ago while on the quest for the perfect pizza and I love it.  Yes, it was expensive, but I had very courteous and fast email responses to my questions and that this stone was "food-grade".  At the time I couldn't find unglazed tiles anywhere near me.

 

I only recently got into baking bread - I could do pizza OK, but good bread eluded me.  Until I read Peter Reinhart's BBA and discovered I really can make proper bread!  So my stone now does more than just pizza.

And yes, with that stone in there, it does take my oven a bit longer to get up to temperature.

fleur-de-liz's picture
fleur-de-liz

Brotkunst:  I don't why the manufacturer recommends baking on the rough surface of the FibraMent stone.  I searched their website and could not find an explanation. My only observation in using the stone is that the rough surface provides nice traction when slipping the bread onto the stone.  As far as any negative reasons for using the smoother surface, you might want to check with the manufacturer.  I found them to be very responsive when I corresponded with them about ordering a custom sized stone.

Liz

BROTKUNST's picture
BROTKUNST

 ... next week. I could imagine that they need the chamfer for removing the stone from the mold - and of course the 'untapered' side has a larger usuable surface. The rougher surface may also help keeping wet doughs that have not enough semolina, rice flour or corn flour on the bottom from sticking (easier) to a smooth surface.

 

I'll let you know what I'll find out. Thank you for your reply ... also for your feedback Maeve.

 

BROTKUNST 

highmtnpam's picture
highmtnpam

I just got my custom sized FibraMent baking stone.  I am soo pleased.  Thanks for your post.


Pam