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My favorite baguette.

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teketeke's picture
teketeke

My favorite baguette.

Note:  6/13/2011  To make good crust and flavor for a baguette, especially in summer, I really watch out for the dough temperature more than the time and roomtemperature.

 

I pulled together in one recipe from my post of Amazing airy baguette that I posted before http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22286/amazing-airy-holey-baguettes 

 It has been 2 months since I made a baguette last time that was in April 1st this year. I copied the recipe and method below and baked a baguette today. It came out good. The shaping and scoring are not perfect but I am pleased with it.

 

 Ingredients:

KA AP 130g

Raisin yeast water 14g

Water 76g ( DDT 69F /20.5℃)

Salt 2.1g

-------------------------------------

Method: ( I always set up at 6pm around so I can bake at 6am next morning)

1. I mixed all the ingredients except the salt for a minute, then add the salt, mix it again for a few minutes with my hands (Dough temperature(DT) 69F)

2. S&F x2 every 30 minutes ( I did in the air with my hands) ( DT was 70F both after the S&F)--Rest at room temperature was 26-28℃ /78.8F-82F for 4.5 hours until the dough is little flat and the surface is slightly bumpy.

 

3.I moved the dough at room temperature around 18-19℃ for about 8 hours

4. The dough in the morning: I saw a lot of bubbles on the bottom. ( DT62.5F/16.9℃)

5. I put the dough on the floured wood board very gently. The bottom is face now.

Stretch the dough X way to make a rectangle around 35cm x11cm is better ( I stretched too much this time I did 41cmx11cm)

6.Using a ruler, make a fold like the picture. Pat the dough gently and

Put tightly squeezed dump kitchen towels on the dough and take a bench time for 15-20 minutes ( I took 15 minutes )

7. After the bench time,

8. Using your finger tips, pat the dough gently... ( I feel like that I can shape the air in the crumb at this time)

9. Push the edge little harder and Pat the rest of the dough with your finger tips again. ( If I didn't do this process, the crumb was tight... I think that both sides dough need some space to have airy crumb when you roll. )

10. Brush off the excess flour and roll and pinch the seam very well.( This picture is a different one. I just want show you how I pinch the dough)

11. Proof : I put a tightly squeezed dump kitchen towels on the linen, then I put it on the top of the refregerator for 35-40 minutes at 70-71F /21-21.7℃

12 Prepare the steaming towels ( Sylvia's steaming method), Scoring, then ready to bake.

13.Preheated 470F ( I can't use maximum temperature 500F because I broke the fuze twice before- too much baking for baugettes)   

  1) Bake at 470F for 7 minutes with steam ( Sylvia's steaming method http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20162/oven-steaming-my-new-favorite-way)

  2) Take out of the steaming towels and a parchement that was on the baguette, then decrease the temperature to 450F  and bake more 13 minutes.

  3) Shut off the oven and open the door a little bit and leave the baguette for 3 minutes in the oven. - I got this idea from David. Thank you, David.

 

I practice to score baguettes a lot using playdough playing with my daughter because I am not good at it. I used to drag so much.. A couple of my Cookpad friends gave me great advices. I am still afraid of it....

How I score a baguette:

  • Score the right angle 80-90 degrees ( it will be difficult to score at acute angle around 30-45 degrees for wet dough)
  • *Score the dough the same speed and depth.  This is the point  Please read the note below.
  • I recommend you to use a bamboo skewer to get the length that you want( probably 10-11.5cm?)and make a mark with a tooth pick or so. --This is from the book.

1) 2) 3)

 

 You can prepare the scoring lines using a stick before you acutally score your baguette dough. The red line ( 2.5-3cm )below will be a lap between first score line and the second one, the same lap for the second line and the third one  and other third and forth lones, too.

 

 

↑ Note: For*Score the dough the same speed and depth.  I score the top and end that I marked on red  (the picture above) again reversely to make the cut depth evenly because my scoring of the top and end is always shallower.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

How do you slice when you score the dough?

I found out that I can score very straight when I use No.1 way. My Cookpad friend suggested me the way. That is very helpful.. I don't think that my way fit everybody but, It may help some TFL members.

-----------------------------------------------------

I will leave the method to make raisin yeast water for reference.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23809/how-i-make-and-maintain-raisin-yeast-water

Happy baking,

Akiko

Comments

kim's picture
kim

Akiko,

Your formula never failed me unless I change your formula (that was my own fault). I baked them before so I knew how good they tasted. I love your outdoor photography.  Thank you again for the updating especially using yeast water version.

Kimmy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Hi Kimmy,

Thank you for your very kind words, Kimmy :)  I don't know about photography but I am studying your skill :P  I am glad to hear that my formulas work out for you.  I am very happy! Thank you, Kimmy!

Happy baking,

Akiko

varda's picture
varda

I have been reading all these posts about yeast water and just went back to read your post on making it.    Thanks for all the detail in both posts.  Your baguette looks fabulous.  I can't quite tell but it seems to be very long.  Also, I'm wondering about your scoring diagram.   You score the same loaf twice?    What is the red circle to the left of picture 1?  Thanks.   -Varda 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Thank you for your compliment, Varda!    I hope you don't have a headache after reading a lot of information of yeast water.  I am surprised to see that there are so many topics of yeast water now.  I have enjoyed to read all of their breads with various yeast waters.

I updated the question you had. Please let me know if you still have any questions.

Happy baking,

Akiko

 

varda's picture
varda

Akiko,   Thanks for clarifying.   I think first is preparing to score by using a stick to make imprint in correct spot.   Then the actual scoring.   -Varda

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Varda,

Yes, you are right, and I put more pictures of the process to make sure you can understand easily because this improved me to score the lines neatly.  

Best wishes,

Akiko

 

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Wow, Akiko !  What a great baguette you made there, and another excellent and informative posting. LUV it !

Ron

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Another big compliments from you, Ron.   I am so pleased !!!   Thank you very much!!

Akiko

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Nicely done, Akiko!  Nice long baguette, too!

Sylvia

teketeke's picture
teketeke

  Thank you for your kind word, Sylvia :)  I am very satisfied with your steaming towel method!  Thank you so much for posting your steaming method here.  http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20162/oven-steaming-my-new-favorite-way

:) Akiko

ananda's picture
ananda

You must have a decent sized oven to bake this type of baguette Akiko!

Lovely work

Best wishes

Andy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Thank you for your compliment, Andy.  I am very happy to see your comment here.  My oven is 12 years old General Electric Double Wall oven.   The longest one was about 50cm long.  The edge of the baguette almost touched to the oven's door when I put it in.   I never had such a big oven when I was in Japan, So I am very pleased with the oven here.  

Thank you  again, Andy:)

Akiko

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Perfect crumb and crust. And it's so nice to be able to make full length baguettes!

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Thank you for your compliment, Txfarmer!   It was difficult to put the long one in the oven, but it worked!

Akiko

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Akiko,

What a beautiful loaf!  Nice crust color and the crumb looks great!

I am very impressed again by all the work you put into the post.  Your great detailed instructions help so much and the pictures you take of the whole process make it all very easy to follow.  

I am also impressed that you got such a wonderful looking loaf using your RYW.  I bet it had a nice flavor and will stay fresh a long time - if your family doesn't eat it all up in one sitting :-)

Take Care,

Janet

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Thank you for your very kind word as always, Janet. :)

Yes, This baguette's crust stays crispy and the crumb is moist for a long time.  My son loves to bring it to school for his lunch.   My family love this baguette, so do my 2 dogs. :)

Thank you, Janet,

Akiko

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Beautiful!

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 I appreciate for your compliment, Floyd.  

 Sincerely,

Akiko

 

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Akiko,

Your baguette is not good... it's awesome! Very nicely done, and a thoroughly well done writeup on your procedure as well. Any baker would be proud to have made this baguette for it's lovely crumb, shaping, crust, and scoring. I've always shied away from from doing baguette at home simply because I've never liked the size restrictions of domestic ovens for the bread. Baguettes should be longer than what typical home ovens will allow, but obviously this isn't an issue with yours. If you don't mind me asking, what make and model of oven do you have?

Great stuff Akiko!

Best Wishes,

Franko

 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Hi Franko,

Thank you for your kind words. I am very pleased with your compliment. I am glad that you like this baguette. I wish I had a picture how I put it in. I think I put the baguette diagonally in the oven simply.

   I don't mind at all, my oven is here:

http://www.epinions.com/specs/hmgd-Large_Appliances-All-Ovens-GE_Appliances_White-on-White_30_in_Electric_Combo_Microwave_Self-Clean_Wall_Oven_with_SmartSet_Control_JTP85WDWW

Mine is white but the same model.  

Thank you again, Franko

Akiko

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

teketeke's picture
teketeke

  Thank you, David!  Your posts has helped me so much.  I appreciate all your work.

Sincerely,

Akiko

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Amazing baguettes, Akiko.

I am sure this post will become a reference for many bakers!

Juergen

 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Thank you for your kind word, Juergen!  Your posts of the test tube baking helped me while I was struggling with this formula and method. I thank you, Juergen!

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22065/test-tube-baking-1-continued-white-french-bread-overproof

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22228/test-tube-baking-2-bulk-fermentation-doubling-size

Best wishes,

Akiko

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Gorgeous baguettes, Akiko. They got perfect scoring/slashes.

A very useful and great write up on the scoring too.

I too score breads on the same direction as yours, diagram 1, with the lenght on pararel to myself (I use curve lame and it works better this way).

Sue

http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Thank you, Sue :)  I am not really good at scoring.. I found the way to practice was  huge help.   I am glad to know that your are scroing the same direction like I do. :)  It is interesting to know how we loose our balance while drawing a straight line.

Best wishes,

Akiko

highmtnpam's picture
highmtnpam

I've gone so far as using food-safe pens to mark (with a dot) the beginning or ending of each score. Works like a charm and really helped my scoring.  The other think I did when I first started to bake baguettes was to sacrifice one baguette and score it then form it again, let it rise a bit, and re-score it and re-score it and re-score it until the dough is really "dead".  Gave me a lot of confidence.

Pam

teketeke's picture
teketeke

  Hi Pam,

Thank you for your experiments, which is very informative.   I appreciate for your generous thoughts, Pam!  I will considerate to sacrifice one baguette to have confidence. Using real dough is more effective for sure!

Best wishes,

Akiko

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

These look truly delicious Akiko - so beautifully open and airy! 

Thanks for the detailed notes on the baguette making and also for the notes on scoring. They are really helpful and I need all the help I can get in these areas!

Many thanks for sharing this.

With very best wishes, Daisy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Thank you for your generous words as always, Daisy.  I like to share my thoughts and the information that I get from Japan which may be interesting for someone here.  I have also gotten a lot of help from TFL here, as you help me all the time.

Thank you, too Daisy :)

Akiko

Syd's picture
Syd

Stunning baguettes, Akiko!  So lovely, long and slender.  Beautiful crumb, too.  Your attention to detail is remarkable.

Best,

Syd

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Hi Syd,

Thank you for your compliment, Syd!   :)    I am happy to hear that from you whom I see as a great baker.

Happy baking,

Akiko

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Akiko,
Your baguette is amazing! Thank you for your hard work and explanation in your post.
It's a joy to see such a beautiful baguette.
:^) from breadsong

 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Hi breadsong,

In the Japanese baking book, I read that a little bit of  yeast and long fermentation at the colder temperature are good to make tasty and airy baguettes.  I had been checking  the dough and  room temperature whenever I move to next step to make sure that I can make the same baguette that I want.  It was a successful finally.  :)   Scoring is different for me.. practice, practice ,practice... that is only one thing to improve from my experiment.   

 P.S  I admire your hand skill, breadsong... 

Best wishes,

Akiko 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

This is one the best Home made baguettes i've ever seen, Akiko! Way to go, you rock!!

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Thank you, Khalid!!!   Your word is a great encouragement! 

:)

Akiko

breadbythecreek's picture
breadbythecreek

I tried this recipe and followed the instructions to the letter. Wonderful result and so fast and easy. Who knew you had to poke the dough to get the holes! Counter-intuitive but it works! Thanks!
Pamela

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Hi Pamela,

I am so happy that you had a wonderful result!  Thank you for telling me!!  You made my day!   Yes, it is little work but it is worth it, I guess. :)

Happy baking,

Akiko

 

breadbythecreek's picture
breadbythecreek

I like a little more grain flavor in my baguettes so I used TxFarmer's formula for the 36+hr baguette with a 100% SD rye starter, but with your shaping and baking method with one twist - I sprayed the razor blade with oil first before slashing.  Here's the result:

photos here

-Pamela

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Pamela,

Very nice crust and nice round baguettes!   Sprayed a razor with oil is a good one!  I use it sometimes. :)  I am glad that the shaping and baking method worked out for you, Pamela!  Thank you for telling us your result!  This baguette is the one that we are all fond of, so do my neighbors. My son and husband and I like rye sour though. My daugther loves this baguette.   It is a good thing to try various kind of recipes to find your favor baguettes, isnt it? :)

Happy baking,

Akiko

highmtnpam's picture
highmtnpam

I keep going back to this wonderful picture.  It makes my mouth water. I really need to try your recipe.

Pam

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Thank you so much, Pam!  I want to know how it turns our when you try it. :)

Happy baking,

Akiko

markStav's picture
markStav

Kudos, Teketeke.  Very impressive looking baguette!  I may have missed something in this baguette recipe and others posted on TFL, but I'm trying to understand what type of pan or stone is needed for the baguette to go into the oven with.  I started off today thinking I really needed to obtain a baguette mold (assuming these were used in French bakeries) but after reading some posts here have decided maybe I don't need one.  But everyone is talking about putting their baguettes into their ovens but not really saying what the dough is resting on.  I do use a large flat round pizza stone to make round loaves, but I notice they can tend to flatten out.  My worry is that even shaping a torpedo like baguette shape from the dough on a stone will end up "running" off to the sides and give me a fairly flattish long loaf instead of the nice vertically rounded loaf pictured above.   Any input/thoughts appreciated, thank you.  

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hello Markstav,

Thank you for your kind word :)

 I am sorry for this late respond..

I am the one who also look for a good baking stone.I think a New York baker baking stone and kiln shelf are good. And, for making steam in the oven, I always use Sylvia’s steaming method.  You can see how she bakes bread, too. :)

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20162/oven-steaming-my-new-favorite-way 

When I bake a baguette, I put the baking stone on the top and the steaming towels on the bottom.  I used quarry tiles and it broke in pieces in 2 weeks, and I useceramic tiles and found out that a kiln shelf is safer.

It is difficult to find a good size kiln shelf to put in my oven.

The maximum size of my oven for the baking stone will be 23x15 ¾ inches or 59 x 40 cm but I will look for less than that.   How big is your oven?

 New York baker stone: http://www.nybakers.com/equip.html

 I hope that helps you,

Akiko

markStav's picture
markStav

Hello Akiko.   Okay, so one of the secrets is a good stone!  Thank you for the link about the NYBakers stone. It turns out their large one would just fit on my lower rack.  (Jenn-Air Expressions double-oven electric convection; 20 x 17 inches)  Then I see where some folks go with Fibrament, so I'll call to see what how that pricing compares.  My pizza stone is only 13 inches in diameter, so not so good for a full fledged baguette. 

Thank you, Mark

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hello Mark,

Thank you for the information of Fibrament! I read some reviews including Susan's: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2009/03/04/everybody-must-get-a-stone/ It is a very good one!

Fibrament : rectangular ( 3/4 thick-1.905cm)  15x20 $ 70 +? shipping...Did you call ?

FibraMent is made from a patented blend of kiln fired high temperature and conductive raw materialsapproved by NSF International for use in baking ovens.

 FibraMent has a 1500°F continuous use operating temperature limit,

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

NYB rectangular ( 5/8 thick- 1.5875cm)  20x16 $52.95+ $14( shipping)=$ 66.95

Our baking stones are made of cordierite, an industrial refractory material that's stable to 2300°F/ 1250°C, FDA approved as safe for food

 

Fibrament baking stone size will fit onto my oven better than NYB's.   If I can't find a  good size of kiln shelf, I will buy Fibrament's.

P.S  I slip the baguette that the bottom is coated with mixed of 50% rice flour / KA AP flour mixture on the baking stone directly. Some people use semolina flour or corn meal and so on for it.   Sometimes, I slide the baguette that is over the parchment paper on the baking stone.

I really appreciate your infomation, Thank you!

Akiko

markStav's picture
markStav

Hi Akiko,

Yes, I spoke with one of the Fibrament salesmen (there is a number listed on their site) and he pointed out that when using their order page you can include a comment about your specific size requirement, that is, you can request dimensions that would be slightly smaller than their stock sizes and they'll do the cutting to size for $10.00.  It was nice to hear that shipping is free. He said that it is important to have about one inch space between the stone and the sides, back, and door of the oven for air to move freely.  So my 20 x 17 oven would get a custom stone of 18 x 15.  I might come up with some fractions if I really look at how far the rack edges are off the sides & back.  The back edge of my racks have a stop bar that is already some distance from the back wall so I could use that space as part of the needed inch on the back.   I'm still undecided about going the NYBakers route or Fibrament, but knowing more about the sizing is helpful. 

I have usually used corn meal on our pizza stone, but I'll going to try some of your other suggestions as well. Hope your baking is going well!

Mark

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Hi Mark,

Thank you so much for taking the time to tell us of the fact that is very useful to get know about the shipping is free, and the size of the baking stone should be 2 inches down sized both sides.  My baking stone will be 21x 13 3/4 instead of my oven size 23x15 3/4.    I am still looking of a good size kiln shelf which is much cheaper than them. It is good to try before buying the Fibrament baking stone.   NYBakers stone has very good reviews as well.  I think you will be pleased with either one. 

50% rice flour / 50% KA AP works well, too.  I baked a baguette today.  I used ice cold water, I also put the dough in the frigerator ( 9-10℃/48.2-50F) that I kept the dough in the bag to adjust to the temperature instead of  6℃/42.8F that is my normal refrigerator temperature)

In summer,

 I put the dough in the bag to control the dough temperature in the refrigerator before I preshape the dough....   (To keep the dough temperature colder)-- That is very important to get the crispy crust and good flavor using simple ingredients in my opinion.) 

 

My baking is going well, Thank you Mark!   I hope your baking is going well, too!   My son's friends asked me to bake these baguettes ( they really like the baguettes), I am willing to make more baguettes for them.:)

Happy baking,

Akiko

quickquiche's picture
quickquiche

Hello,

I have recently come across this post and am super impressed by the appearance of these baguettes!! The crumb looks very much like that of the baguettes I get from the local baker.

I am wondering though, do you attribute this open crumb to the raisin yeast water you use in the recipe?  I really want to try this because I have been striving for baguettes with this kind of crumb and have had very little success. I am usually told that kind of airy crumb is because of other things (i.e. "steam" while baking, long ferments of the levain, etc, etc) but this is the first I've ever heard of this raisin yeast water method.  

Where can I find the link to the recipe to make the raisin yeast water?

Thanks,

Tory

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Hi Tory,

I am sorry that I didn't respond quickly, Tory.   

I am usually told that kind of airy crumb is because of other things (i.e. "steam" while baking, long ferments of the levain, etc, etc)

I agree with the sentence that you wrote above.

 

Here is the method to make raisin yeast water:

 http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23809/how-i-make-and-maintain-raisin-yeast-water

And, I think you will be able to get airy crumb using yeast water easily more than you use dry yeast water.  And, I think that is very important to handle the dough with a gentle touch while shaping.   I also care about the dough's temperature before shaping. The dough should be cold around 52F for 8 hours at least, and until the dough rose doubled ( 1.5 times in bulk is fine too), that is for making good crispy crust, as well as good flavor. 

Here is my baguette diary that I started recently.   Prefemented baguettes are good too.

https://www.evernote.com/Home.action#n=e1e6163d-f1ba-4946-a36e-8fae2b28af4b  

I hope your baking is going well!

Akiko

 

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