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Syd's white sandwich loaf - original and yeast water

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varda's picture
varda

Syd's white sandwich loaf - original and yeast water

 

Syd's white sandwich loaf http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22464/white-sandwich-loaf has been on my to bake list since it was posted.   But those lists are ever growing and time is ever short and I'm ever distractable, so...  One of the distractions has been the yeast water craze.   As much as I pride myself on being above fashion, the simple fact is I'm not.   So when Daisy suggested that an enriched bread might be a good candidate for yeast water, I decided to kill two birds with one stone and try Syd's loaf with yeast water.   The problem with converting a recipe before trying it first, is one has (I have) no idea what one is (I am) doing, so I had a failure or three.    Then I decided to bake two loaves side by side - one Syd's original formula and the other, his formula converted to yeast water.    The loaf pictured in the first four photos is made with Syd's original formula scaled down by 3/4.   The only deviation is that I did not use ascorbic acid.   

 

The resulting bread is probably the most feathery light I have ever made.   The taste is mild but delicious.    Unfortunately the pictures can barely capture the wonderful taste and texture of this bread.    My recommendation - if you have any taste at all for white bread, go to Syd's original post and bake it.  

For the second loaf, I converted to yeast water by replacing all of the water in the poolish with yeast water and omitting the yeast.    I also omitted the yeast from the final dough.   Otherwise I followed exactly the same formula, again without the ascorbic acid.   After mixing both batches of dough this morning I had to go out for a few hours, so I refrigerated both bowls.    When I got back, the yeast version had already doubled, while there appeared to be no change to the yeast water one.    I shaped the yeast one and placed in a bread pan to proof, and stretched and folded the yeast water dough and let it bulk ferment on the counter.    Before long (I wasn't watching the clock) the yeast loaf had risen an inch above the pan so I baked it, and then shaped and proofed the yeast water loaf.   By the time the yeast water loaf was ready to go in, it hadn't even cleared the pan top.   But it was softening so I decided to bake it.   In the oven it grew to around 80% of the volume of the yeast version.   

After tasting the original, I was ready to hate the yeast water version, but surprise, surprise, there was nothing to hate.   While the yeast water loaf wasn't as feathery light as the original, and really the taste was completely different, it was every bit as delicious as the first - just a different style of bread.   It's hard to come up with exactly the right words, but the yeast water loaf had a tiny bit of a tang, and a more complex flavor in a somewhat denser (not dense, just denser) bread.   The picture below is of both loaves (yeast water on the bottom) and below that two shots of the yeast water crumb.   I will be hard put to decide which one of these to make next time.   Such dilemmas are fun to have.   Thank you Syd, for posting your fabulous and delicious formula.

 

 

Comments

Syd's picture
Syd

It's my pleasure, Varda. :)  You got a lovely open crumb, there.  What loaf tins did you use and what weight did you scale the dough at?  I think the poolish makes all the difference to this formula.  Without it, it would just be an ordinary white loaf.   I have tried this formula with my sourdough starter and the result was very similar to your yeast water loaf: a slightly more compact crumb, but very good flavour.  I haven't tried making yeast water, yet.  I really want to try, but I have hardly had any time to bake lately, let alone start new experiments.  Nice baking, Varda.

All the best,

Syd

varda's picture
varda

I wouldn't normally get so excited about white sandwich bread, but this is special.   It must be the poolish.   Since it was so good and I wanted to eat it, I made sandwiches for dinner last night.   My husband and son talked about the bread the whole time they were eating which is definitely not the usual.   The loaves each scaled to around 670 and lost maybe 50g over the course of the bake.   I baked them in pound loaf bread pans.   Dimensions are 8x4x2 inches.    The yeast water completely changed the character of the bread.   For me this moves it out of the category of novelty and starts to expose some of the possibilities.   When things settle down for you, it is definitely worth giving it a try.  Next time I make this formula using yeast water, I might not use a pan.    Somehow I feel that it would be more appropriate to cook as a hearth loaf.  -Varda