The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Maybe my new house doesn't like bread?

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sydnieflorence's picture
sydnieflorence

Maybe my new house doesn't like bread?

Hey everybody I am new here! I hope someone can give me a little help. I moved a few months ago, but not far only about 20 minutes away. I used to make bread all the time and it always came out wonderfully. I am using the Bread Baker's Apprentice book. Ever since we moved to our new house yeast will not rise. I have proofed it and it works fine but once you get it in a recipe, no such luck. I have bought all new ingredients: yeast, flour, sugar, butter, still the same. Any ideas on how to pinpoint the culprit? Thanks for your help!

breadbythecreek's picture
breadbythecreek

Have you tried bottled or filtered water? Chlorinated water and yeast don't get along. If you must use tap water, pour it out the night before and leave it loosely covered to dissipate the chlorine.I typically have a carafe of water on the counter that I use for baking just in case. Maybe you'll get lucky and this simple fix will do the trick. Good luck!
-Pamela

Chuck's picture
Chuck

I heartily second trying different water. Although it may not turn out to be the source of the problem, change of water is clearly a suspect for anyone who's just moved, and it's very easy to check (easy things first, even if just to rule them out:-). (Water supply boundaries are magical; I've never been able to figure them out. Moving just a couple miles quite often means the water that comes out of the tap looks the same but in fact is completely different.)

Next possibility: Did you buy new flour after your bread wouldn't rise right, or as part of moving? (Or to ask the same thing a different way, have you ever tried to make bread with the old flour in the new house?)

Yet another possibility: Where and how do you store your yeast? Is it possible in the new house the yeast is in a cupboard that gets quite hot in the warm weather? (The best storage place seems to be a jar with a tight screw-top lid in your refrigerator.) Yeast that's "3/4 dead" may still look like it "proves" okay, even though it doesn't have enough oomph to raise bread.

highmtnpam's picture
highmtnpam

that as you bake in a house, more "yeasty" spores start floating around your kitchen.  In a new (really new???) house your bread won't rise as fast for a bit.  I've noticed differences every time we've  moved.  Once I moved into a house of a "baker" and all my bread rose faster than the house before... Someone will explain what those "yeasty" spores really are...there are quite a few chemists on 
TFL.

Pam 

sydnieflorence's picture
sydnieflorence

I tried some today with filtered water and it worked like a charm! I am so excited to have fresh bread again. Thank you so much for your help!

breadbythecreek's picture
breadbythecreek

Happy that that was the cause! Bricks are no fun!
-Pamela