The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

linen lined baskets

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andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

linen lined baskets

When I was in France a few months ago  I bought a few linen lined baskets - some round, some oval - most with obvious linen lining. But the one I've just used for the first time - a BIG round one easily up to holding a two kilo miche, had a very fine linen liner - almost like silk. It wouldn't really absorb any flour, so I covered the shaped loaf itself fairly liberally with flour instead, before putting it in the couche. The loaf popped out SO EASILY - I think it might be a polyester lining!! But it works so well!  Onto a round baking tin and into a cold oven - amazing oven spring and I am delighted with the result.
However - I wouldn't like to use it to drop a loaf into a HOT (NYT) casserole -if it made contact I think it might melt! Anyone else had experience of synthetic couche liners???
Andrew

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

the people who suggested a cold oven start, by the way. I use little else now - so effective.

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Andrew_I,

Is there any chance you would know a link or a brand name to search on or store that would have these online? I'd be interested to get one and try it out.

Bill

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

with synthetic liner was Carrefour, Cité Europ, Calais. The ones with linen liners were made of fine cane; this one looked more coarse - almost like rushes? And a fine, fine liner. As I say - the loaf come out so easily - I've never had one  give so little resistance! There is a very large kitchen department so I imagine it will be listed under the kitchen appliances, or perhaps "batterie de cuisine"???!
Andrew

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Andrew,

Do you have any experience with a product listed at San Francisco Baking Institute listed as a synthetic couche liner? I ordered some to check it out. I didn't have luck finding an online version of a synthetic lined banneton for a 2Kg round loaf so far. However, SFBI also had 12 in x 6 in round rattan banneton, which I also decided to try. I do fine w/my 8 quart bowl and linen couche from KA, but I can't resist trying something new here.

Bill

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

I'm in the UK so haven't heard of this... If it's a fine, silk like synthetic liner, you might as well give it a go - you could use it to line the 12 x 6 rattan banneton?
Andrew

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Andrew,

I ordered some of the synthetic linen from sfbi and the 12 inch diameter, 6inch deep banneton. I'll see how it goes with that and let you know if it works. Thanks for the idea. Maybe I can get one of JMonkey's 90% hydration recipes and see if I get the Elmer's glue effect he's been mentioning.

Bill

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Andrew,

I finally tried out some of the synthetic couche fabric listed on the sfbi web site. I cut some rectangular towel-like pieces and just settled them into my coiled oval shaped bannetons. They therefore had folded fabric in a few places in order to shape the lining to the banneton. I tried to flour them, but like you, I found they don't take much flour. I dusted the tops of my loaves, but I guess I probably missed a spot or two on the sides. When I turned them upside down on a peel, they did slip right out, although they stuck very minimally on the sides in a couple of spots. It was easy to gently remove the fabric where it was stuck, though. No problems at all. The loaf was white flour at about 75% hydration with some first clear flour in it, which made it fairly sticky, but maybe not quite as sticky as a 90% hydration WW loaf. Overall, I would say the fabric was somewhat better performing than my KA couche fabric, which I think works very well. However, clearly it's important to dust the sides of the loaves carefully, since the flour isn't absorbed well by the couche fabric itself.

Bill