The Fresh Loaf

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Pain Meunier - and having fun with shaping

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txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Pain Meunier - and having fun with shaping


 


This recipe is from "Advanced Bread and Pastry". Using white and whole wheat flour, wheat germ, and cracked wheat (aka. bulgur, my new favorite bread ingredient), the bread is super fragrant and packful of flavors. I wanted to convert the formula to use sourdough, but was busy preparing for and running a half marathon last weekend, so stuck to the poolish version in the book.


 


In my last post, I tried some interesting shapes for baguette, this time, I tried another shaping method from the same site, you can find the video here.


 


Pain Meunier (adapted from "AB&P")


note: makes 2 lb loaves


-- poolish


bread flour, 241g


water, 156g


salt, 3.5g


yeast, 1/4tsp


1. mix and leave at room temp for one hour, put in fridge overnight


-- soaker


cracked wheat (bulgur), 57g


water, 57g


2. soak for at least 2 hours, I did overnight


-- final dough


bread flour, 202g


ww flour,21g


wheat germ, 11g


water, 153g


salt, 3.5g


all poolish


all soaker


3. mix together everything but soaker, autolyse for 30min, mix at low speed for 1 min, midium speed for 3min. Add soaker, mix at low speed until blended in.


4. bulk rise for 1.5hours (25C) until double, S&F at 40min.


5. divide into two parts, preshape into oval, rest for 20min, shape according to instruction here


6. proof seam down on parchment paper for 50min (25C)


7. flip the bread so it's seam side up, and bake @ 450F for 40min, with steam for the first 15min.


 


Really like how the shape turned out



 


Thought all the rolling and twisting would affect the crumb, but what a pleasant surprise, full of holes and very open for a 66% hydration dough (not counting water in the soaker).



 


Flavor is out of this world, I REALLY like the combo of ww and cracked wheat. For my sandwich loaf, I soaked crack wheat in hot water(about 2 hours), this time in cold water (overnight), I can't really tell the difference. Both method soften the grain without turning them into mush.



 


Plan to make this one again very soon, probably a sourdough version. Oh yeah, the half marathon went well too. I finished in 1:45, crossing the finish line with my running partner, very good race.



 


Submitting to Yeastspotting.

Comments

Floydm's picture
Floydm

That is so beautiful, TXFarmer.  Would you mind if I featured it on the home page for a bit?

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

I am honored!

probably34's picture
probably34

I think I'm going to try this bread out. In your post I think you mentioned that you'd like to try a sourdough version. I read in the BBGA Bread lines about a walnut levain that contains a fermented soaker. I think they added the "sour seed" at 10% of the weight of the cracked wheat and let it ferment 12 hours. Seems like it might be interesting to try that out with this formula. Naturally fermented cracked wheat soaker and a yeasted poolish. How do you think the yeast quantity should be adjusted if I were to try this out?

Patrick

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

I have never used a "sour seed" before, so can't advise on how to adjust the yeast amount. I would keep the yeast amount the same for now, and keep a close eye during fermentation, then go from there.

ananda's picture
ananda

Some formula that Txfarmer.   Great bread, indeed


Best wishes


Andy

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Thanks Andy, this is a keeper for sure.

Bread Breaddington's picture
Bread Breaddington

Too pretty to eat.

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Ha, never! We already ate one loaf. :)

ehanner's picture
ehanner

What a great looking loaf txfarmer! It has a very wholesome look to it.


Is your Bulgar from Bob's Red Mill?


Do you have trouble running the videos from that site? I have to launch it and leave for 20 minutes while it finally loads.


Eric

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Thanks Eric. I got mine from Central Market (an organic grocer in TX) bulk food section, the label says "cracked wheat(bulgur)".


The video indeed was very slow to load. I actually launch and go make a bread before checking back.

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

I have found these videos to be served at only a little above dial-up speed. That's ridiculously slow; twenty minutes or more to download a one to two minute video. My solution is to download to disc, then view the local copy in an flv viewer. I use Ant's downloader/viewer, available for Firefox and IE.


cheers,


gary

arlo's picture
arlo

That's just awesome!

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Thanks arlo!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

The shape to inspire kings!  


Press and press and twist, Press and press and twist.  Lovely!  (great video addition)

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

The shape is actually one of many variations on "fendu" I think, the surprising part is that all the rolling and pressing and twisting didn't harm crumb that much.

Syd's picture
Syd

It reminds me of a royal sceptre.  Just beautiful txfarmer!


Syd

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

It is like a royal sceptre huh? Thanks!

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Everything about that looks superb - the crust, the crumb, the shaping.


The photography looks great too. I really like the way that you feature the grains used alongside the final twisted bread. It really looks like a shot from a professional baking book. Looks great on the Home page. 


It looks like my kind of dough too. I mostly do mixed grain breads at around 68% as I like the nuttier taste and am finding that I can get good crumb development at that hydration. Would just need some bulgur wheat. I feel I've gone a bit mad with different flours, recently, but I could use bulgur for pilau too...Think I might start with a baguette or torpedo though - would have to work up to torsadé...


I would be interested to know if you do a sourdough version. I am finding it quite hard to readjust to the smell of baker's yeast after sourdough and raisin water leavens. 


Well done on the marathon also!


With best wishes, Daisy_A

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

This shape is actually very easy, easier than baguette/torpedo since you don't even have to slash, give it try!

emmsf's picture
emmsf

Beautiful bread.  I look forward to trying it.


I did have a quick question.  Did the original version of the formula (AB&P) call for cracked wheat or bulgur?  Bulgur and cracked wheat aren't the same thing.  Cracked wheat is simply that - cracked grains of wheat.  Bulgur is wheat too, but it has been partially pre-cooked.  I suspect the bread would be terrific with either, though different, and I'm intrigued.


 

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

I am aware of the difference, however, bulgur is often also called "crack wheat", which is confusing. In this case, the book says "cracked wheat", but only calls for a cold soak for 2 hours (to overnight), which makes me think it's bulgur. Either way, it's going to work.

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

I have been reading the comments on cracked what and bulgur - and wondering why they need to be soaked? I always add either bulgur or steelcut oats to my sourdough boules and hadn't ever heard or thought of pre-soaking them. Maybe the overnight refrigeration softens them enough? They are visible in the crumb but not at all crunchy. Any ideas? A.

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Bulgur absorbs a lot of water (for this formula, by the end of the overnight soaking, all water was absorbed), slowly, which means if you add them directly in the dough, the dough would seem wet enough at first, but slowly become too dry as bulgur absorbs water. The same applies to other seeds like oats, flaxseeds. Pre-soaking can help gauging appropriate hydration level during dough mixing.


 


In addition soaking also helps soften the grain. This bread uses poolish, and only takes about 4 hours to make, which might not be enough for the bulgur grain to soften.

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Thanks, txfarmer, I'll try soaking the 1/4cup of bulgur next time, A.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Thanks for the link, too! Very nice video collection.


David

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Thanks David!

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Amaizing, Txfarmer.. the relentless persuit of perfection..! This is truely a piece of art,, thanks for posting..!

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Thanks! This was supposed to be a "quick loaf", but what a pleasant surprise I got!

ehanner's picture
ehanner

txfarmer, I noticed in the book, the final dough calls for a small amount of malt. It isn't specified in any of the mix formulas. I'm guessing you didn't use it. The coloring in the crust certainly doesn't need any more richness, it's almost red as it is.


Eric

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Ha, the malt is only listed in the "total formula", so I didn't even see it until now, which means I didn't use it. Good catch!

3 Olives's picture
3 Olives

I don't have the original recipe. How much malt does the recipe call for? Thanks!

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

What a beautiful loaf!  What an inspirational loaf and video!  Thanks for sharing!


Sylvia

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Thank you Sylvia!!

KrizzRulz's picture
KrizzRulz

Firstly, I'd just like to say what an awesome baker you are! I've been reading your blog and marvelling at how open you manage to get your crumb so open even with doughs full of stuff!


Sencondly, I have a question. You say to proof the bread seam side down, but how do you get the seam to appear on top in the final bread?


Thanks


Christiaan

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Because you flip the bread so it's seam side up before baking. It's clear in the video, so I didn't mention in the procedure. I have added a note in the post, sorry for the confusion.

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

This would be a fun shaping method for making cinnamon bread for the kids, or even arrange several in a star (points outward) and the center piece round (or missing ...like a wreath).  Someday...


Beautiful bread though, and thanks for sharing.  I'm going to try making it soon.  Planned on it this weekend but was just too busy with my daughter's birthday (and 10 giggly-girl party ...all of them 13 years old plus or minus, plus one boyfriend).


Brian


 

hening's picture
hening

收藏这个网站很久了, 在新浪关注你的微博发现图片好眼熟,才发现这边的文章也是你发表的,,

Noor13's picture
Noor13

Looks really great and I really want to try it. 


I have a couple questions though-did you put salt in the poolish? This is how it looks to me in your formula? And also if you autolyse you are not supposed to have salt in it either, or am I wrong here?


Sorry, for my questions. it is probably clear to everyone else lol

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Salt in poolish is to control poolish's rising pace.


 


In the strict sense, autolyse is done without salt since salt tightens gluten. It should also done without yeast to avoid over rise. However when yeast is in the poolish, we have to add it to the dough to get the right hydration, so we comprise and allow the yeast in poolish to be added in the dough during autolyse. Same thing with salt. While it does tightens the dough to some degree, when necessary, we can add it during autolyse without too much troulbe. Tell you the truth, a lot of times I get lazy and just dump everything together to autolyse. Can't really tell a difference so far. There must be a difference, but with bread baking, there are so many variables anyway, this one thing won't be the deal breaker.

Noor13's picture
Noor13

Thank you so much for the explanation


Now I have yet another question. About the poolish again. Whenever I made poolish it usually calls for the same amount of water and flour. So would this in your formula be a biga then? I am confused lol

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

While poolish is often 100% hydration, I have seen it in other ratios as well. The definition of those terms vary from baker to baker. AB&P calls this poolish, so I am not arguing. ;)

Noor13's picture
Noor13

Thank you so much for the explanation


Now I have yet another question. About the poolish again. Whenever I made poolish it usually calls for the same amount of water and flour. So would this in your formula be a biga then? I am confused lol

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

The only difference between a poolish and a biga is the hydration, right?  (Sorry if this hijacks the thread).  As far as I know, I haven't seen any difference in say, the temperature or time or ingredients otherwise, so it's just the hydration??


Brian


 

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Short answer yes. For a longer and more involved discussion: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/2784/biga-v-poolish

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

I concur ...thanks!  I read the whole other thread and have the 2 links for more homework yet.  Will read as time permits... but I'm at work!


Brian


 

Noor13's picture
Noor13

so much for your answers 


 

3 Olives's picture
3 Olives

Thanks for the recipe and detailed instructions. BTW, those are nice photos and they convinced me to give your bread a try. In fact, I placed an order last night with Bob's Red Mill so I'll have all of the ingredients.

ajfisher's picture
ajfisher

What does S&F in step 4 mean?  Thanks


Ari

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

stretch and fold

ajfisher's picture
ajfisher

I'm going to give this a shot this weekend.  What does the stretch and fold step accomplish? 

 

Ari

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