The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

hello from MI

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starrcross's picture
starrcross

hello from MI

Hi my name is Bridgett and I live in a litlle town in Northern MI. I found this site searching for a recipe close to one my mother had. I have been unlucky so far. this recipe is very old and I am having a hard time figuring this one out. I am putting all her recipes in to a book and it is taking a long time because I am preparing each one. I can't ask her because she passed away. If anyone could help on how to prepare this I would greatly appreciate. I remember eating this as a kid, and it was delicious! here is what my mother had written down, exactly.

2 cups scalded milk (cooled to warm), 2 compressed yeast cakes, 2 Tbsp. sugar, 1 cup oatmeal, 1 cup raisins, 1/4 soft shortening, 1 beaten egg and 2 tsp. salt. 

 Crumble yeast cakes with 2 Tbsp. sugar, sift and add 4 cups of the flour and salt ( reserving the 1/2 cup for kneading). Let rise until double. Punch down and let rise again. Roll dough out on board and sprinkle with some sugar (about 1/2 cup) and some cinnamon. Roll up into loaves: let rise. Bake at 400 for about 45 minutes.

See what I mean. what do you do with the shortening, egg, oatmeal and the raisins? alot of my mothers recipes are like this. I guess she just knew what to do. These directions are not clear enough for me! 

this is a very nice website with lots of nice recipes.

Thanks

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

First of all welcome to Fresh Loaf!

The recipe is really not so difficult to figure out. You might want to try it this way: In a large bowl: place the yeast (which I think could easily be reduced to one cake) it crumbles nicely with a fork using sugar, when it turns to a liquid in just a few minutes add the warmed milk (scalded and cooled if it is fresh from the cow) be careful it's not too warm it could kill the yeast. Then it follows that egg, oatmeal, raisins and shortning are added beating smooth with a spoon or wisk after each addition. Beat in salt and slowly beat in 3 1/2 cups of flour (all purpose?) plus 1/2 cup for kneading. Let dough rest 30 minutes then turn out onto floured board or kneading surface and knead aproximately 8 to 12 minutes. Place the smooth ball shaped dough upside down into an oiled bowl (to oil the top) and flip over. Cover and let rest in a warm place to double about 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Then punch down, that means to knock out the big bubbles that have formed in the dough, this is done by pushing down on the dough or dropping the bowl firmly or flopping the dough out onto the kneading surface or flipping the dough over in the bowl and folding the sides into the middle, flip it over again and let rise, covered (so it doesn't dry out) a second time. Flop out onto a very lightly floured board, top side down and roll out sides to make a large rectangle twice as long as your loaf pans. It looks like the recipe makes two loaves in a standard loaf pan. If you have the pans, it would be a good time to add their sizes (as loaf pan sizes vary). Now comes the sprinkle part and tightly roll up starting with the long side next to you. Pinch the seam shut. Divide, cut into two loaves tucking and pinching the ends under, seam side down, while placing in greased loaf pans. Cover and let rise about one hour. Bake in pre-heated oven. Cool on wire racks. Brush hot crust with butter.

Does this help? ---Mini Oven

starrcross's picture
starrcross

Thank you so much. I will try this and see how it works. right now it is awful hot here so I think I will wait until the weekend. I will let you know how it turns out.                My mother was such a wonderful cook and created so many delicous recipes, but she rarely worte down the exact directions, because she just knew! So I have been patiently been making them all and learning knew things along the way.

Thanks again this really will help!

Bridgett

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

And greetings from another Michigander.  Yeah, I know, I live in Kansas these days, but Michigan is home.  MiniOven didn't mention it, but she has Michigan ties, too.

I think that MiniOven has given you a very workable procedure to follow but I wanted to throw in some more options.  One: if you do scald the milk, you could soak the oatmeal in it as the milk is cooling so that it is hydrated and easier to blend into the dough.  Two: instead of stirring the raisins into the dough, you could either fold them in during the final minute or two of kneading or roll them up with the cinnamon-sugar mixture.  Either approach would help preserve the raisins' shape more than if they are subjected to the entire stirring and kneading process.  Three: (and this is purely for decorative purposes) you could roll the dough in oatmeal immediately before placing it in the pans or you could place the dough in the pans and brush the tops of the loaves with an egg wash and then scatter oatmeal on the loaves.  Four: if you can't find fresh yeast at your supermarket, you can always use instant yeast (mixed in dry with the flour) or active dry yeast (proofed for a few minutes in a small amount of warm water before stirring in with the other wet ingredients).

All of the above options are just that: options.  You don't have to do any of them but you may find that one or two of them contribute to the flavor/texture/appearance that you remember from your mother's bread after you have experimented a bit.  It sounds like you will be enjoying some delicious oatmeal cinnamon raisin bread soon, along with memories of your mother.

When you say Northern Michigan, do you mean the northern Lower Peninsula, or the Upper Peninsula?  I grew up near Kalkaska, which is about 25 miles east of Traverse City.

PMcCool

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Bridgett, I wanted to correct the milk. It should always be scalded even if pasturized. Only if powdered milk is used, the scalding can be skipped. Mini Oven