The Fresh Loaf

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Rye bread tips and tricks applied

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Rye bread tips and tricks applied


 


 


This is the “80 Percent Rye with Rye Flour Soaker” from Jeffrey Hamelman's “Bread.” It's a wonderful bread about which I've blogged before. (Sweet, Sour and Earthy: My new favorite rye bread) These loaves were made applying a number of tips and tricks contributed by a number of TFL members, and I have to say, I was pleased with the results of every tip I used. So, a big “Thank you!” to MiniO, hansjoakim, nicodvb and the other rye mavens who contributed them.


I followed the formula and methods according to Hamelman, with the following techniques added:




  1. Rather than dividing and shaping on a floured board with floured hands, I wet the board, my hands and my bench knife. I kept all of these wet, and experienced much less sticking of this very sticky dough to the everything it touched.




  2. I shaped the boules “in the air,” rather than on the board. Again, less dough sticking to the board, and I think I got a smoother loaf top without tears.




  3. I proofed the loaves in brotformen, floured as usual with a rice flour/AP mix, with the seams down. This results in the loaves opening at the seams, yielding a lovely chaotic top to the loaves and no bursting of the sides.






I am very happy with these loaves. I'll continue to use these techniques and recommend them to others struggling with high-hydration, high-percentage rye breads.


David


 


 


 

Comments

arlo's picture
arlo

Bold and enticing. I love it David.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

arlo's picture
arlo

I am waiting to the masterpiece of a sandwich created with those loaves. I am sensing smoked salmon, perhaps mustard and dill. Maybe some havarti...


Breakfast? Lightly scrambled egg on top of cream cheese, maybe some of that leftover salmon too on top please.


On a serious note, using Bob's Red Mill Dark Rye flour with these David?

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

These loaves were baked for a couple of my non-bread baking siblings, although Glenn may get a taste, I suspect. He's a sharp negotiator. We'll see what they make of them.


Yes. I used BRM Dark Rye for these, except the rye sour was fed with KAF medium rye.

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi David,


Mmm, they do look lovely - so rich and chocolaty and well-formed. 


Thanks for sharing the successful techniques from such an inspiring bake!


Daisy_A

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

Is there a crumb shot coming? I'm sure it would be fantastic for St. Paddy's corned beef..alas, if we had any left over...


I use BRM's dark, because that's all I can find in the local stores. I could get in my car and drive to Bob's in 30 minutes, but I've been happy with the dark. I use it for my sour, which I use almost exclusively for my sourdoughs, our favorite being WW. It's great in the white too. A purist, I'm not.


Betty

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

This bread is headed for a family brunch next weekend in Oakland. It might be fun to try to stop the meal so Glenn and I can photograph our baked goods. And then to try to convince the rest that this is normal behavior.


I have no complaints about BRM Dark Rye. It's readily available. It seems to be consistent. It makes good bread. I need to visit BRM next visit to Stumptown. 


The KAF Medium Rye got used because it needs using. I've had this batch for a while. It's very thirsty flour, which I tend to forget until after I've mixed it.


So, you use a rye sour for "white" sourdoughs? I don't worry about purity. I'm getting the notion that I like breads that have some whole grain with most or all the whole grain flour prefermented.


I still generally feed my starter with a 70/20/10 mix of AP/WW/Rye. It seems happy and well-nourished.


David

kim's picture
kim

Hi David,


I will try this recipe after I finshed eating my last slice of light sour rye breads. Your air shaping methods is really a good tip.


Kimmy

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I can't take credit for "air shaping," although I've used it in combination with final shaping on the board for quite a while. It just worked so well for this sloppy rye dough.


If you like high-percentage rye breads, this one is a winner. The one with WW is also very good.


David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

The color and crust are just beautiful!  Thanks for sharing the tips and tricks!


Sylvia

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

As I wrote above, none of the tips and tricks are original with me. They were shared by various members. i just combined a bunch of good suggestions I'd been meaning to try, and wanted to share my experience and thank those who contributed their tips.


David

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Lovely looking Boules, David.. Very Bold and round..! Nice tips.. thanks..

ehanner's picture
ehanner

It's so nice when the seams open up and deliver those open natural fissures. This continues to be my most unreliable technique. Sometimes it works, sometimes not. Yours are wonderful.


Eric

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I think shaping "in the air" helps the fissures open during oven spring. The key is to avoid sealing the seams too well ... I think.


David

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Can't beat shaping in the air for this kind of dough!  Beautiful!  Lovely crust!


I think when it's in your hands, you can tell so much about how the dough is coming along in the fermenting.  It smells so good and smoothens out so nicely with wet hands.  


Clean up is much easier too.   

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Your suggestions have helped me a lot in my rye adventures.


I'm sold on "air shaping" for this kind of dough.


Since you mentioned the smell, the sour for this bread had an amazing aroma - very fruity.


David

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

David, magnific loaves! Yes, those tricks really make life much easier when dealing with so tricky doughs.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Thanks for sharing your tricks!


David

joyfulbaker's picture
joyfulbaker

I've not heard that term before, and I sure could use a good technique for shaping loaves from gloppy dough. 


Thanks!  Joyful

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Beautiful, David!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

It's great to see you back on TFL! You have been missed, my friend.


David

Mebake's picture
Mebake

So, you managed to steal a Picture? What was the look on the faces of your visitors :P


I did it once, with my parents, to celebrate the birth of my first NON-flat wholewheat loaves.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

you were very happy with these loaves - I would be, too!


Guten Appetit,


Karin