The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Superb sandwich bread, perfected honey wheat sourdough, luscious brownies, and...PIZZA PIZZA PIZZA!

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odinraider's picture
odinraider

Superb sandwich bread, perfected honey wheat sourdough, luscious brownies, and...PIZZA PIZZA PIZZA!

Here is the white sandwich bread from Julia Child's Baking with Master Chefs. I made one pan loaf and one small round. It is a great white bread that my girls love. It does not have the integrity of the Jamaican hard do, but it is rich in flavor and texture.



Next up is the honey wheat sourdough I have been working on. It is still too warm to slice, so I can't be sure of the crumb, but it is nice and firm, has good lift, and a great smell.


Once I am sure of the crumb and taste, I will post the recipe.



 


Here are some moist, rich, and chewy double chocolate brownies.



 


And finally, one of my family's favorites: Pizza! Pizza in all its simplicity: sauce, cheese, fresh basil and oregano, and pepperoni on one of them.



 


Tomorrow will bring baguettes and focaccia.

Comments

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Allan,


That looks fantastic! Great work. I am glad so many people have enjoyed my recipe. I'm in the midst of developing another for brown multigrain sourdough I think will be a winner as well.


Matt

madruby's picture
madruby

Hi Matt,


I was able to get my hands on some Italian type 00 flour.  Do you think I can use that flour in lieu of bread or AP flour for the pizza dough, and if so, how would I need to re-adjust the recipe?


I just made a batch of your dough using AP flour.  It is now fermenting and I can't wait to see how it turns out.  The next time I do this again, I'd like to use the Italian flour though.  Thanks for letting me know.


 

odinraider's picture
odinraider

 


Hmmm...the 00 flour is finer than KA AP or bread flours, but since you are measuring by weight instead of volume, you should be alright with a direct substitution. If you find the dough to be a little stickier than it should be, you can let it be and have even bigger bubbles in your crumb, or you can add a small amount of high absorbency flour, such as whole wheat, semolina (my choice), or spelt.

madruby's picture
madruby

but no more.  I was not convinced that a dough that has undergone only 1 hour of fermentation would yield something flavorful and tasteful but I was wrong.  This pizza dough was pretty good.  I had a good crust with enough air.  I do not know how to roll a pizza properly so I am still playing with all of that.  I can't wait to see what kind of dough the Italian 00 flour will yield.  Thanks for sharing your recipe Matt.

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Thank you very much. I am glad you gave the recipe a shot. I know the general rule is long slow fermentation equals flavor, but there are other techniques for developing good taste.


Many people use an overnight bulk ferment to gain a flavor advantage, but I created this formula due to the fact that when my family wants pizza, they are not disposed to waiting until the next day. In fact, I have a hard time convincing them to wait the hour and a half from mixer to plate it takes to make these pizzas.


Also, you don't roll pizza dough (at least not this one); you lightly suggest where it should go if it is so disposed. I gently stretch it and use my fingers to press it until I get an approximately roundish, squarish shape. Maybe the next time I make this probably this weekend) I will do a little video showing how I shape the pizzas. That might help some who are having trouble.


Let us all know how the double zero works out. Maybe it will be worth the effort having some shipped to me.

madruby's picture
madruby

Hi Matt,


I ate some of it last evening but decided to use the other half today after it underwent an overnight fermentation.  Brought it to work and my Italian colleagues (picky eaters!) really enjoyed your dough. 


By the way, no worries about my ROLLING out the dough.  I only used the word "rolling" to mean strectching, then rolling, but it was always clear in my mind that I wouldn't be rolling the pizza like I would do with a pie dough.


I will try the type 00 substitution and report back.  Unfortunately, as I have posted on other threads, I am awful at manipulating and shaping the pizza so my end result will still be so-so due to my poor handling.  Your video will be a joyful input.


Finally, would you mind explaning why your dough, albeit the short hour fermentation, yields good flavor and taste (which is contrarian to the "long and slow fermentation" rule).  I am not savvy enough to understand what it is about your recipe or process that makes that result.  Thanks again Matt!


 


 

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Ha ha, if the Italians like it, I know it's good! If you really want to impress them, do this as pizza alla romana. Make it really thin (like, you could get three or four out of one batch of dough), then top with good olive oil and course sea salt. Bake it until it is nearly charred, on your oven's highest setting. Take it out of the oven, and drizzle on some more olive oil. Or bake it with a thin coating of fresh crushed tomato juice for pizza rossa alla romana.


Well, the flavor compounds come from the sugars breaking down in the flour, and byproducts of the yeast (and also, of course, salt).


By using such a high hydration level, and warm water, the flour is breaking down more quickly than a lower hydration. You're actually oversaturating the flour, giving it more water than it can absorb. This causes a rapid breakdown of enzymes and other proteins. Hence, quick gluten and flavor.


This recipe calls for about double the yeast as most recipes. That means more little helpers giving off carbon dioxide (hence the bubbles), as well as feasting on the flour and emitting their flavor compounds.


Finally, the hot oven quickly browns the sugars in the crust, for that final kick of flavor. The end result: yummy, chewy, pillowy, pizza crust.

madruby's picture
madruby

Funny that you would say that...ie impress them with a thin crust cuz that is exactly how it turned out.  With your recipe, I was able to make 4 pizzas (2 eaten last night and 2 taken to work today to bake them....yah, great job where I can actually cook - cool!).  I made my own homemade tomato sauce but forgot it on my kitchen counter.  I ended up having to sprinkle oilve oil and a few herbs ...then just baked them as - is.  That"s what my colleagues went wild for.


I personally thought the crusts were a tiny bit too thin but that is just a matter of taste preference.  Will use your recipe to try out the type 00 flour next.  Cheers.

madruby's picture
madruby

As promised, here is my report after using the type 00 flour with your recipe.


First, I'd like to mention that the type 00 flour I bought had no other information on the package (written in Italian!).  From reading another thread, not all type 00 flours are conducive to baking pizza.  Apparently, protein content, W coefficient, bla bla bla, nothing I know about, are all factors one needs to consider when using type 00 flour for pizza.  Hence, I am not even sure that the type 00 I used was the right flour for pizza.


Secondly, since I have never eaten pizza that I knew was made specifically with type 00 pizza flour, I have no point of reference to compare my own pizza.  Having said that, I have tried your recipe 2 times with the type 00.


The first time, the pizza came out pretty OK.  From the same batch, I was able to make 4 dough balls.  I did not think there was much difference between the pizza made with the type 00 and the one I made using AP flour.  I do admit that the crust made with type 00 was slightly better, with more air, but only with the second dough ball.  The first dough ball was slightly overcooked so the pizza dough was a bit hard, too thin and rather tasteless.  The second dough ball had much better results.


On my second trial (ie this pm), I again divided the dough into 4 balls.  The first pizza was really good.  In order to prevent the pizza from being overcooked, I monitored it closely and the result was very tasty.  Thin pizza, nice crust, decent holes.  However,  the second pizza was OUTSTANDING.  Same thin pizza, bigger holes, but I also had a nice chewy crust.  Things are getting better and looking up!  Hubby and friend both thoroughly enjoyed the experience.  My friend is Italian and he thought I made an even better pizza than his sister (their father was an Italian chef).  No worries, I gave all the credit to you and your recipe!


I can't say for sure whether using type 00 did anything as I do not have enough data/experience to compare, but I will have to go back to AP flour again and perhaps the next time, I would be in a better position to see the differences, if any.  Again, very very happy with your recipe though.  Quick and easy as heck.  Still a lot of room for improvement though cuz I don't think mine looks quite as nice and HOLY as your pizza crust above.  Cheers.


PS - when using type 00, I reduced the water from 360 g to 310 g since type 00 requires less water.  However, the next time I do this again with type 00, I will increase the amount of water a little more and see what it will yield.  A suivre...

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Thank you for the great info. And the compliments. I love when I am told (often indirectly) by Italians that my pizza is better than other Italians' pizzas. It's a huge boost of confidence. Although, I guess nationality really need not dictate a proclivity toward a given task. I know Mexicans who cannot cook huevos rancheros, but make astounding bulgogi. Funny old world.

Matt

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Madruby, Italian 00 flour is a soft wheat flour with much less protein (8-9%) than bread flour (12-15%) or even AP (10-12%), about the same as pastry flour. It is standard four Pizza Napoletana, a very soft dough that has to be gently stretched to achieve the desired irregular shaped crust.

I can't show you the difference in pizza crusts, but I can show you what these different flours look like in the crumb of some of my breads.

Hamburger Rundstück, a German roll, made with mostly Italian 00 and a little bit of AP flour. The crumb should be kind of fluffy, and can be easily  pulled out, it should be not chewy and airy like this French bread:

Pain a l'Ancienne, made with bread flour and a little bit of multigrain mixture.

Lovely pizza, Odinraider (somebody here likes fantasy movies???)

Karin

 

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Karin,

Those pictures are fantastic illustrations of 00 flour. I REALLY need to get my hands on some so I can experiment. I wonder if a portion of pastry flour mixed with AP would yield similar results...hmmm...

Matt

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Matt, try it out.

I found that pastry flour comes very close to Italian 00 flour, so it is a substitute.

Karin

 

anneton's picture
anneton

I've been on a long quest to find the perfect pizza dough. i've managed to achieve beautiful and delicious results,bit your pizza dough is absolutely awesome!It came out light, fluffy and crispy. what a bliss! thanks a bunch! and by the way,i  doubled the recipe and substituted 175 gr.of AP flour (out of 900gr.) with whole wheat flour. Also  added 50 gr. of  60% hydration starter. thanks again

 

odinraider's picture
odinraider

I've tried the WW in there, too, but met with much protest from the tribe. I think they figure they get enough health with the other stuff we eat. I like the taste a lot, though.

Matt

ferginator's picture
ferginator

 

 

I made this pizza last night for the first time and it was amazing....exactly what I have always been hoping for to make at home.  It will take some more practice to stretch the dough out a little thinner but not bad for my first batch.  I was a little scared to over handle the dough whilst forming the pizza rounds.  Thank you so much for sharing Matt.    -Marc

odinraider's picture
odinraider

That looks tasty! A bit thick on the crust, as you mention, but man, I would certainly take a bite!

Matt

sybram's picture
sybram

Matt, have you experimented with freezing the dough after mixing, before letting it rise?  Just wondering.

odinraider's picture
odinraider

I sure haven't. I developed the dough in response to my family's insistance that they spring on me at the very last minute when they crave pizza. So I've had no occasion to freeze it. I assume it would work much like freezing any other dough. Their is certainly enough yeast to survive the chill, but the excessive wetness may cause ice crystals to form, depending on your packaging method.

Matt

sybram's picture
sybram

Thanks, Matt.  Your pizza was so easy to make.  Everything worked just like you said it would.  My DH likes more "stuff" on his pizza, so next time I'll doll his pie up with tomatoes, mushrooms and maybe sausage.  I'll continue to make mine just the way you wrote it.  ;*)  It was especially good since I got the basil and oregano out of my very small herb bed.

I'm starting your honey wheat bread tonight, but I'd also love the recipe for the white bread you showed us if you would care to share that one, also. 

Thanks again,

Syb

odinraider's picture
odinraider

This is my latest, and probably final, recipe for a white sandwich loaf. My wife and kids love it, and it stays fresh for about a week in a bag.

450 grams bread or all purpose flour (which flour depends on how chewy you like your slice)

292 grams water

2 grams yeast

9 grams salt

9 grams sugar

23 grams oil (I use grape seed or olive or vegetable or any other healthy oil - not rapeseed "canola;" it makes the finished product taste fishy)

Autolyze the flour and water for 20-30 minutes. add all other ingrediants, and knead until elastic, about 10-14 minutes.

Bulk ferment 2 hours. Punch the dough down after the first hour.

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees.

Shape the doughby pressing it flat on a counter, making sure to remove all the air bubbles you can. While holes are great in most bread, they prove problematic with jelly or mayo... Stretch the two sides out and fold them over one another. The tightly roll the rectange of dough up, sealing the end.

Proof the loaf, in a bannaton, in a pan, on a linen, however you want, for about an hour.

Bake without steam. Turn the oven down to 350 degrees once the bread goes in. Bake 15 mintes, rotate the loaf, and bake another 15 minutes.

Enjoy!

sybram's picture
sybram

Thank you again, Matt.

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