The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

This weekends baking part 2, lots of pics..

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tattooedtonka's picture
tattooedtonka

This weekends baking part 2, lots of pics..

I dont really know if these photos will help anyone. I wanted to post them so some folks who may be having problems with shaping batards and baguettes and transferring to peel could see how I do it (I'm not a pro, I'm just using this as the way that works for me). And on with the show....

I start with a 3/4 sheet pan and take a dish towel and roll it up into a cylinder laying it against one side. Then I take a sheet of parchment paper and lay across the top of the rolled towel. I then take another towel and roll it up and place it under the paper against the first loaf. Then repaeat first step in placing next loaf, followed by another towel.

After the loaves are done with their final rise I use a razor to cut the paper around the edges of the loaf.

Second loaf is done the same way.

After the paper is trimmed I transfer loaf, paper and all onto peel.

Half way thru bake I turn the loaf 180 degrees on the stone pulling the paper out during the process.

And here is the sourdough baguette coming out of oven.

Here is the sourdough batard after bake.

And another photo of baguette after bake.

Here is a hodge-podge of this weekends bake. Whats left of my daughters two white loaves. Whats left of my Sourdough boulle, a SD batard and baguette. And a dozen bagels getting ready to go into the boil.

And I still have another boulle of sourdough in the fridge waiting to be baked after chillin for another 24hrs. I think I need to start thinking about wearing a kilt. Its getting awfully warm by mid day in my kitchen. And from what I understand, I can even get one of those cool little hanging pockets for the front to keep my measuring spoons in...... :-)

TT

Comments

susanfnp's picture
susanfnp

Those rolled up towels are genius!

But enough about that, we want the photo of you in the kilt ;-)

Susanfnp

bluezebra's picture
bluezebra

Serious genius TT! Very serious genius!

Do you cover your loaves as they rise or do you let them form a skin on them?

tattooedtonka's picture
tattooedtonka

Under the blue plastic wrap like I have on the bagels in bottom photo. 

When I do boulles I put the dough into white plastic bowls with lids on them, this way they are covered and shaping at same time.  When Im ready to bake them I just remove lid, place parchment over top of bowl, lay peel over that and gently flip the bowl and peel over and slash loaf.  After they sit for about 2 minutes into the oven it goes.

As for the kilt, maybe some day...

TT

 

staff of life's picture
staff of life

I have to agree with Susan--those towels are such a smart, unique idea!  I'm always amazed to see how home bakers use what we have at our disposal to mimic (that's not the right word, but it's 11 pm here!) what the pros have.

Trishinomaha's picture
Trishinomaha

I made four Essential's Columbia loaves this week-end and was really stymied when it came time to move them from my makesift couche to the parchament paper for baking. This will work pefectly. I finally ordered a peel yesterday from fantes.com (great cooking/baking supply site by the way). I can't wait to try your method. Your slashes are perfect - I'm having a real challenge with that right now. I don't think I'm cutting deep enough - how deep were these slashed?

 Trish

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

I've wanted to make this formula, but lack a couche..thanks!

Also, just something that may help others with slashing..I use a dedicated serrated knife for slashing. The one thing I noticed was most demos I've seen of slashing have the lame at a slight angle. I slash with one stroke and with my knife straight. When I tried to angle I found the flat surface of the blade dragged on the loaf,not making a clean slash.

tattooedtonka's picture
tattooedtonka

Thank you for the kind words.

The slashes I made are with the double edged razor blade you can see in the top pic.  It is my multi-tasker.  I grab one end of it and slash letting about 1/2 to 3/4 of the blade bury into the dough. 

Now this is where alot of folks, including myself, seemed to get jumbled up in what we've read or heard.  I have read in some of my books how you are suppose to make a QUIK slash across the dough ONE time to avoid drag marks.  Another would say go across the same cut multiple times.  Bah!

I go once across the dough going one direction.  Then I go back across the same cut the other direction.  It always seems for me to get a, not so nice cut, at the end of the path, and best at the beginning.  That is why I like to go back the other direction.  This way I get a nice opening on each end.  (I hope that makes sense). 

 Sometimes the slash will not fully open, the blade will pass thru and then the dough will stick back together.  This is most likely due to me not having the blade bent on a lame.  But being used just as a striaght edge.  I just gently help it open by running the blade thru the trouble spot again. 

If I have a really big loaf that I want to really open up I will make multiple (5 or 6) passes with the blade, each time cutting the slash at an angle.  This helps with making a big ear coming up off the loaf.  Usually I just go with what you see above.

 I hope this makes sense.

TT

Trishinomaha's picture
Trishinomaha

I had lost track of this thread and had to do a search for it. I'm off work for the next 3 days and will be making a lot of bread. (I just got my new KA mixer via UPS yesterday from the Kitchen Aid on line store. It's "reconditioned" one but looks like new. I can't wait to try it out.) I'll be making a lot of bread these next few days and will try your method.

Thanks again,

Trish

browndog's picture
browndog

I finally broke down and made a batard today out of half a batch of Columbia--it being the second hottest day of the year, naturally I felt compelled to bake in every respect. When I whined sullenly to myself about how: "I can't make an oval loaf, I don't have a couche or banneton..!" "Oh," I replied sternly to myself, "yes you do..!"

The results of this ground-breaking experiment have yet to be determined.

 

xma's picture
xma

Tattoedtonka, using parchment paper to line your loaves in between kitchen towels is a stroke of genius.  I don't have a couche, which has always been my excuse for not making baguettes.  Now I don't have an excuse!

Browndog, I like my batards on the short and fat side, and I guarantee you can make them without banettons, because I don't have one either.  Just create a nice, tight surface tension and the loaf will hold its shape.  Come to think of, this method of tattoedtonka would probably have helped the corn bread we were talking about from spreading.  I really like free-form loaves and would avoid using loaf pans as much as possible.  I'll let you know if I get to try it again. 

browndog's picture
browndog

Xma, fancy meeting you here! I did the towel couche, and it worked a treat, as they say. I set it up, tucked in the loaf, scratched my head and thought, "how much room should it get?" But it came out fine. However, I did not get the spiffy ovenspring that TT, you, and just about everybody else on site, including Bill's son on his first loaves, seem to get. Very nice bread and all, with a killer good aroma and flavor. I always used to get good spring with my sandwich loaves, but it's very elusive now. I'm too old for a challenge, jiminy crickets. *sigh* and you see, I'm doing it again...(thread hijack.)

You do cold start, correct? If you have suggestions I'll be lookin' for 'em.

xma's picture
xma

we might become known here as the thread hijackers, so let's move back to our good ol' all-purpose one, ok?

karniecoops's picture
karniecoops

I know this is a bit late in the game - but love your  "couche".  I just made a couple of beautiful loaves - had them in my home made couche (left over fabric sitting on the bench top) , but then for the life of me couldn't figure out how the get them off and into the overn without completely munting them!  I kind of picked one up and flopped it onto the baking tray, then tried to roll the other, had to gently slightly reshape both.  Chucked them in the oven and hoped for the best! The good news is they turned out brilliantly, although my slashing is rubbish!

I am going to try your method, just need to get one of those wooden things to scoop them up with.  Thanks!

K.