The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Large(r) Loaves

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Leisesturm's picture
Leisesturm

Large(r) Loaves

Greetings:


               I am now a two time bread maker. I used the same recipe for both attempts. 100% Whole Wheat, mainly because that is the only kind my wife enjoys. The technique and the recipe were obtained from Bob Curry a Jesuit Brother who wrote a book on Jesuit bread making. As desribed, the recipe makes two 9 x 5 loaves. We found the bread delicious (both times) but the finished loaf just a bit two small for sandwiches or anything else. I wonder how to go about making larger size loaves using this recipe. Is there a larger size of loaf pan than 9x5? If I were to use the entire mass of dough as one loaf instead of separating it into two as instructed, how much loaf would that make? The instructions are to bake the two loaves at 400F for 40min. If now one big loaf would the time/temp need to be changed? If two big loaves were made, how much time and what temp would be necessary to bake them together? Lots of questions, I know. Sorry if this is an old topic. TIA.


H

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

how interesting. Anyone tried this yet ?


 

Home Baker's picture
Home Baker

I saved this info from another comment thread, here:



Loaf pans in the US come in three basic sizes; 8×4, 8½×4½, and 9×5 inches. These are nominal 1, 1½, and 2 lb bread loaf sizes. … A good place to start for each size pan is 500g, 750g, or 1000g of dough. Adjust on experience with your particulars.



I sometimes bake whole wheat loaves in 9 X 5 loaf pans. Before I found the handy rule-of-thumb above, I experimented with size on my own, eventually settling at 950 grams per loaf. I start the 9 X 5 panned loaves in a steamy oven, preheated to 500°F. I lower the temp to 475°F as soon as I close the oven door, then after ten minutes I lower the temp setting again to 460°. After 20 minutes I rotate the loaves, remove steam and lower temperature a final time, to 440°F. I start checking for doneness at 35 minutes. My oven temp might be uneven because the loaves don't always finish at the same time. I keep returning the unfinished loaves to the hot oven and checking them until each loaf reaches an internal temp of 212°F. My oven holds four loaves on one shelf so that's how many I make at one go.


Hope this helps,


Sam

ehanner's picture
ehanner

My experience is that if you bake larger loaves they will require longer to get them to an internal temperature of 195F for WW loaves and 205F for white breads. Because they are larger, you will probably have to lower the heat by 20F or so also so the crust (tops) don't get over done before the crumb gets done. I would get a inexpensive dial thermometer and check after your best guess at baking time, by turning the bread out of the pan and checking the temp from the bottom. If under temp, put it back in for another 5 or 10 minutes. With WW breads, you need at least 190F to 195F.


Eric

swtgran's picture
swtgran

Leisesturm, when you describe the bread from a 9 x 5 bread pan as being too small for sandwiches, do you mean the loaf that is coming from that size pan is too short?  In other words, are your loaves rising slightly above the top edge of your pan and then rising substantially above the top, while baking? 


I have always found bread baked in that size pan to make a pretty large sandwich slice if is risen properly and with adequate oven spring.  If the bread doesn't rise tall enough, maybe it is not the pan size, but the recipe or technique used for the recipe.

Leisesturm's picture
Leisesturm

The finished bread barely rises to the top of the pan. I don't believe it is failing to rise. It doubles in size as directed. When placed in the pan it is just a little blob of dough maybe six inches or so. In 45 minutes it completely fills the pan but it doesn't get much bigger than that while baking. To be exact about it the pans are 9.25 x 5.25. True 9x5 would trade some width for height but not much I don't think.


I wondered if the bread should, in fact, rise over the top of the pan. That is why I made it again exactly the same way. Maybe I should try another recipe? But if I threw the entire dough mass at one loaf, instead of two, I think I could get a decent sized slice. I would need a bigger loaf pan to put it in though? Hmmmmm. New question... if I put all the dough inteded for two pans into one, the dough would likely rise well over the top of the pan, would this be a problem?


H

ehanner's picture
ehanner

How about adding say 20% to the formula. Just multiply everything by 1.2 and you should have just enough to fill the pan and then some.


Eric

BellesAZ's picture
BellesAZ

That's what I would do... otherwise, bake the bread in a smaller pan to get a better rise.. you'll have a taller loaf.  A 9x5 pan should make really good sized sandwich slices.  Sounds like the bread amounts are too small for that size of pan.

Leisesturm's picture
Leisesturm

Math... ... so I got Googling... that I can do...  http://chefben.tripod.com/recipe_calculator.html seems like a handy tool. It isn't perfect and when it can't do a particular multiplication it simply doesn't but it will do fractional serving multiplications. Just giviing back a little...


H

yy's picture
yy

there are pullman loaf pans that come in 13-16 inch lengths (overall dimensions are 13/16 x 4 x 4). They're readily available on amazon.com - just search pullman pan. The only problem is that they're quite expensive. The ones I've seen are around 30-40 dollars.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I learned early on that you can spend a lot on some pans. I discovered I have many casserole-type pans (mostly corningware) to suit almost any need.A spray with some pan release or a brush on with the same and it is perfect.


I make WW bread for 2 and have found that the rectanglular corningware makes a wider but shorter loaf-almost like a widepan bread-just not rounded/oval. Good sandwich size and about 10 slices. I freeze one. That way there is always bread available.

swtgran's picture
swtgran

Yes, the bread should rise above the top of the pan by an inch.  It should then continue to rise straight up while baking. 


If the entire recipe will fill the pan by 2/3 rds, I would consider shaping a loaf that size.  If you have a little dough left, then try making the rest into 2 or 3 sweet rolls.  Just roll the dough flat, spread with honey, sprinkle with cinnamon, roll up like a jelly roll, slice with some thread or unflavored dental floss, place in muffin tins that have a little brown sugar and a small pat of butter, let almost double and bake.

BellesAZ's picture
BellesAZ

I find that corning ware or other type of dishes don't brown well and bread tends to steam in them.  Metal pans have always performed best for me. 


Also, if you have leftover dough, you can refrigerate it until you bake that bread again.  Then toss it into the next batch to increase the flavor of your new dough.