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80% Sourdough Rye Bread- adapted from Jeffrey Hamelman's 'Bread'

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Franko's picture
Franko

80% Sourdough Rye Bread- adapted from Jeffrey Hamelman's 'Bread'

 



This bake started out with two things in mind. I wanted to make an 80% sour rye bread and to bake it in my Pullman pan, which I’ve used only once since I bought it this past summer. While I was looking through Hamelman's 'Bread' for a recipe to use, I stopped on the photo page showing the assorted rye breads from Chapter 6, and not for the first time thought what a marvellous display of craftsmanship it was. The one in particular that has always stood out among the others for me is the Pullman loaf at the back, sitting vertically with a series of diagonally crossed slashes the length of the loaf. I've wanted to try that slashing pattern ever since seeing it, so now I had a third thing I wanted to do, but first I needed to find a recipe to use. Unfortunately the photo in the book doesn't say what particular bread the Pullman loaf is. The only rye in the chapter other than the Horst Bandel Pumpernickel that calls for a Pullman pan is the 70% Rye with a Rye Flour Soaker and Whole Wheat Flour, and that didn't fit with what I had in mind. I decided to make Hamelman's 80% Sourdough Rye with a Rye Flour Soaker, but to make it using only natural leavening rather than the combination of sour and bakers yeast called for in his formula, and to substitute dark rye for whole rye in the soaker and final mix. Somewhere along the line I decided to throw some toasted sunflower seeds into the mix as well for a bit of added flavour and texture.


When I was making the sour/levain the night before the final mix and looking at the tiny little portion of mature sour expected to convert all that raw rye flour into the only source of leavening for this bread, I must admit I had some doubts. 18 hrs later it was clear that I had underestimated just how active my starter was. It had just about popped the lid off the container, looking more like a ripe, dark, poolish than any rye sour I've made before. Simply amazing how voracious natural yeast can be in the right environment.


Three hours before the final mix the seeds were toasted in a 350F oven for 10 minutes before I checked them for colour. I was looking for a medium to dark colour to bring out a rich nutty flavour, which I think is a key component of the overall flavour of this loaf. The time will vary for different ovens, but the smell and colour of the toasted seeds is the best indicator to watch for.


The mix was started in the stand mixer and finished by hand. In retrospect I should have done the entire thing by hand and saved myself the trouble of cleaning sticky rye paste out of every possible space it could get into on my mixer. It was just too large for my small KA to handle properly through to a finished mix, but it did get it off to a good start, needing only 2-3 minutes of handwork to develop it into a cohesive paste. Final ferment, rise and bake notes are included in the recipe to follow. Molding the bread into the pan properly is a fairly critical step to have a symmetrical finished loaf, and I spent enough time with this stage to ensure the baked loaf would be level on top and that the corners would be as even and square as possible. One thing I should point out to anyone who might make this loaf or something similar. When you place the paste in the pan, make sure that the bottom and sides of the paste are dry by blotting off any excess water from the initial molding with a towel of some kind. I didn't, and had a bit of a sticking problem in one spot when it came time to unmold the loaf. Once it had cooled a bit, along with some very gentle persuasion, it did release cleanly, but a word of caution on this point. The loaf was set to cool, wrapped in linen, for 16 hrs before slicing.


I have to say this is the best tasting hi ratio rye bread I've made so far, largely due to the sour itself, but also how well the flavour of the toasted seeds compliments not only the sour, but the dark rye flour. A thin slice of this bread has that level of flavour that lasts in the mouth for the better part of an hour and makes you want to come back for more. The crumb itself is moist and dense, and even after 6 days shows no sign of staling, due to the soaker and pan baking I'm sure. The bread is a dream to slice, yielding slices just about as thin as you could possibly want them without crumbling. Although I didn't get the nice definition on the slashing as pictured in Hamelman's 'Bread' it's a fact I can easily live with when the bread tastes as good as this one does. My favourite rye? No doubt in my mind this one is it for quite some time to come.


Franko





 

80% Sourdough Rye with a Rye-Flour Soaker and Sunflower Seeds-adapted from Hamelman's 'Bread'

 

 

Ingredients

%

Kg/Grams

Sourdough/Starter

 

 

Whole Rye Flour

100

390

Water

83

315

Mature Sourdough Rye culture @ 100%

5.1

20

Total

 

725

 

 

 

Soaker

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

100

200

Water-boiling

118

236

Total

 

436

 

 

 

Final Dough

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

 

200

High Gluten flour

 

200

Water

 

197

Sea Salt

 

20

Soaker

 

436

Sourdough

 

725

Toasted sunflower seeds

 

90

Total weight

 

2143

 

 

 

Overall Formula

 

 

Whole rye flour

40

400

Dark rye Flour

40

400

High gluten Flour

20

200

Water

72

720

Salt

1.8

18

Sunflower seeds

9

90

 

Notes: The total weight of this mix is scaled a little heavier than what you need for a 13x4x4 Pullman pan. Scaling weight for these pans is 2.050kg. Because the dough is very sticky, I found I lost some of the dough to my hands, paddle etc. The final weight of this formula should be more than enough to compensate for that. Scaling weight for the bread pictured was 29 grams short of 2.050 .

 

 

PROCEDURE:

Before final mixing:

Mix the sourdough and leave for 17-18 hours to ripen at 65-70F.

Next mix the soaker, cover with a lid or plastic wrap and leave over night at room temperature.

 

Final mixing:

DDT -80F

Mix all the ingredients except the sunflower seeds on 1st speed for 3 minutes. Adjust the hydration so that the mix is loose and sticky.

Add the sunflower seeds and mix on 2nd speed for 3 minutes. The mix should resemble a paste rather than a typical wheat based 'dough'. It should be soft and sticky.

 

  • Depending on the size of the mixer you may need to turn the dough out on to the counter and finish mixing by hand. If so, have your hands wet, and use a scraper to help fold the dough over itself several times until it's uniformly mixed.

 

Place in a bowl, cover, and let bulk ferment for 30 minutes.My dough was cool after mixing and at 74F. It was given a slightly longer 45 minute bulk ferment.

 

Shaping:

Using wet hands, form the paste into a log and place in the pullman pan.

 

  • the pan I used has only been used once previous and the glaze is intact. Because of this I didn't oil or dust the pan with flour. My preferance is that the sides of the loaf look smooth and free of flour if possible. With an older pan it should be either oiled and dusted, or lined with parchment to prevent sticking.

Press the paste into the corners of the pan with wet hands, then using a wet plastic scraper pressed flat on top of the paste, press down firmly, working the paste so that it's even along the edges of the pan on all sides. Try to get the corners as square as possible and then use the scraper to smooth and flatten the top so that it's level across the entire surface.

 

Final rise and baking:

Final rise of 2- 2 ½ hrs at 70-72F, covered with a clear plastic box if possible or a plastic sheet. Keep the paste damp on top if needed by spraying with water. The bread does not need to be scored, but if scoring do it just a few minutes before loading in the oven to allow the slashes open cleanly.

Bake at 465F for 15 minutes then at 435 for 45 minutes. The loaf should have pulled away from the sides of the pan, similar to the way a cake does when it's baked. Allow the loaf to cool in the pan for a few minutes before tipping it out. Cool on a wire rack, wrapped in linen, for 12 hrs before slicing.

 

 

Comments

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Totem bread! 


The rye looks absolutely wonderful, Franko.  


While I've not made the 80% rye, I have baked a few of the lower percentage sourdough ryes from Bread. They sure are joyful to eat.

Franko's picture
Franko

Thank you Lindy!


I like the idea of a Totem bread a lot. I'll have to see if I can expand on that in a future bake, but I'm flattered you think this one has any small resemblance to a Totem in the meantime. I truly appreciate the compliment.


This is an excellent rye bread for anyone to make for themselves. It's pretty forgiving if you treat it gently and stick to the short bulk ferment time. The payoff in flavour is heads and tails over any rye I've tasted previously, whether it was a low or high ratio formula.


Thanks again Lindy,


Franko

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Love the photo's too!  First thought came to my mind was the music from, 2001 A Space Odyssey  :)


Sylvia

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Sylvia,


Thanks for the 2001 comparison! LMAO when I read that, still chuckling as I write this in fact. It is a bit of an obelisk isn't it?


Many thanks for your compliments on the loaf and photos as well.


How are you feeling these days? Last time we talked you mentioned you weren't feeling too great. I hope that's passed and you're on the mend. Looking forward to your next post Sylvia.


Great to hear from you, and all the best.


Franko

Syd's picture
Syd

Just the kind of bread I like to eat, Franko.  That crumb shot made my mouth water.


regards,


Syd

Franko's picture
Franko

Thanks Syd! It's a keeper alright.


Franko

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

One Maritime Plaza, a high rise in San Francisco.


451658


Looks tasty, Franko!  (The bread, not the building).


Glenn

Franko's picture
Franko

 Remarkable similarity between the two isn't there?


Makes me wonder if the architect is a fan of Hamelman as well.


Thanks Glenn!


Franko

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I have made this rye as hearth loaves, and it's absolutely delicious. You've inspired me to make it again in a pan.


What quantity of dough did you make to fill your pullman pan? I gather you baked it uncovered.


David 

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi David,


First off, thanks very much about the bread. You've inspired me on a number of occasions, so it's nice to be able to return the favour.


Now some answers. When I read your comment and question I thought 'I'm sure I put that info in the formula' and then scrolled up to see I hadn't included the formula in the post. My apologies. Just to save you the time looking for it, the scaling weight indicated by Hamelman is 2.050kg. My mix was a little short of that from it sticking to various items in the kitchen, including myself. The recipe above is tweaked up a bit to compensate for this, and in any case I think this particular loaf could use a bit more weight for appearance sake.


Franko

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

but imagine how much better would it be in your oval brotform. Nice!

Franko's picture
Franko

Thanks Nico,


As far as the shape, it was just me wanting to try something different and get some more use out of my Pullman pan. I'm notoriously bad at cutting an even slice of bread so this shape makes it a lot easier on me. ;>)


Franko

louie brown's picture
louie brown

is among the best ever. I don't know if you intended it or not, Franko, but your picture is equal to the apparent quality of the loaf. Between the image and the description of the taste, this is the best reason to get a puillman pan and have a go at it. Gorgeous.

Franko's picture
Franko

Thanks Louie, much appreciated!


The photo was at best, semi intentional. Really more luck than anything, as I'm a point and click photographer...on a good day. A Pullman pan is a good option to have, especially if you're doing some cocktail sandwiches for a party or gathering.


Thanks again,


Franko

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Franko,


I am so glad to read of how your rye culture has been coaxed into monumental and towering activity.   Lovely sight, and, doubtless the toasted sunflower seeds really add something.


I line the pan with silicone to avoid the sticky problems you mention.


Thinking I should be doing something similar this weekend


Very best wishes


Andy

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Andy,


Yes, the rye sour took some coaxing to be sure, but once I found a nice warm home for it during the daytime it came around with a vengeance. The flavour of the toasted seeds really make this bread a standout as far as my own personal tastes are concerned. Next time I make it I'll scale it slightly heavier and leave it unscored for a better volume, hopefully. Thanks for your comments!


Hope you have a relaxing weekend.


All the best,


Franko


 

wally's picture
wally

That's a marvelous looking rye and you've achieved a nice crumb to boot!  I think for ryes of this hydrations, panning/tinning yields to my taste a nicer looking loaf than trying for a boule which I've never been able to get to the same profile/height.


I've had some 80% ryes last me almost 2 weeks without staling - in fact, I now wrap them in aluminum foil because one batch wrapped in plastic wrap actually molded from the moisture level before I got finished it.


Nice bake, indeed!


Larry

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Larry,


Thanks very much! Having been a fan of your own rye work over the last year this is a great compliment indeed.


If I was to do this in anything other than a pan it would be the oval brotform that Nico suggested earlier in the post. I have done it that way with a previous bake of the 80% Rye from Bread and it turned out OK, but I wanted a loaf without a lot of flour on it after baking. Doing this one in a brotform would take a whack of flour to keep it from sticking. I'm quite sure. The moisture level in the crumb today I swear is the same as it was when I first cut it on Monday, nor is the flavour fading as far as I can tell. Think this might qualify it as a "long trail rye"?


All the best Larry,


Franko

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I might simply increase the volume of the loaf by adding whole or cracked toasted nuts -- 250g ought to do it.
Isn't rye marvelous?!
I still like to freeze part of the loaf on the second day, cutting it first. That way I know it will last.
Like that crumb shot! Yum!

Franko's picture
Franko

Thanks Mini!


More nuts you say...? Good idea, I'll do that next time.


I agree, rye is pretty marvelous alright, especially when you get one that suits your taste as well as this one does mine.


Franko

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Very nice post Franko. Your photography skills equal you baking skills. The sunflower seeds are a nice touch.


Eric

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Eric,


Thanks about the post and the bread, much appreciated.


As far as photography skills, here's what they consist of..take a lot of shots in a couple of different light conditions and camera settings, hope for the best, pick the 4 or 5 that don't suck and use them in the post. Whoever invented the digital camera with expandable memory had me in mind when they did. LOL!


Thanks again Eric,


Franko

EvaB's picture
EvaB

That looks so good, I don't have a pullman pan, but do have a long bread pan, almost twice as long as a regular 8 by 4 pan, and it looks like an interesting loaf. And like Mini said I could freeze a good portion of it.


David asked if you baked it uncovered, and I didn't see a reply to that, but suspect you did, since you slashed the top. So may give this a try, next week, as I think I have all the ingredients. I do like rye, and adding the toasted pumpkin seeds is great, suspect that the toasted nuts Mini suggested would be good as well.


And if you think you can't slice bread, then don't ever worry, mine is the worst. I have even gone so far as to get a special box with spaces that you can slide the loaf into and slice between the stakes to get an even slice, the only problem with that, is its not going to take a round loaf, or even a couple of the pan loaves I've made, so shall have to have DH, fix that when he has time.

Franko's picture
Franko

Many thanks Eva!


This is a very tasty rye bread. If you like rye I think you should give this one a go.


Your right , I never did answer David's Q about the lid, but no, I didn't use it for this one.


I remember my Dad frequently complaining about how I would "hack up" the family loaf of bread when I was a kid. Although I've gotten a little better at it over the 40-50 years since then, the improvement is slight at best.


All the best Eva,


Franko

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Rye in all its Glory, Franko! And with nice seeds to boot... this should be a keeper for you, well done!


Beautiful Pics too!


 

Franko's picture
Franko

Thanks Khalid!


This bread is easily my favourite rye bread so far, and while I don't normally do back to back bakes of breads, I'm seriously considering it for this one. I appreciate your comments and compliments on the loaf a great deal Khalid!


All the best,


Franko

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Franko,
I've enjoyed seeing the beautiful rye breads made by you, David and Andy lately on these pages.
I appreciate the details in the posts & enjoy the commentary back and forth too (helpful to try to pick up what you all understand so well about baking rye!)
Thanks, from breadsong

      

 


 


 

Franko's picture
Franko

Thanks so much breadsong!


It's a pleasure and a privilege for me to be able to chat back and forth with David, Andy, Mini, Eric, and so many other skilled rye bakers on this forum about formulae and methods for rye breads. Next to hands on instruction it's the best learning venue available that I've run across.


Thanks again, and all the best!


Franko