The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

using snow melted for water in breadmaking

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BELFAST's picture
BELFAST

using snow melted for water in breadmaking

got some snow melted it made a loaf in my bread machine. , think i noticed a improvement  i have tried brita filtered water verses tap water  good water has to make a difference   any comments  baking friends    thomas ., london . canada

dwcoleman's picture
dwcoleman

I live in London, ON as well.


I've never thought of using snow, I always use tap water and haven't experienced any off tastes or bad loaves.

flournwater's picture
flournwater

I guess it depends on where you live and what the quality of your local water supply is.  But melted snow, after all, is simply water  -  often with a mineral content that probably differs to some degree from what comes out of your faucet.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Works like a filter for the air.   Each snow flake builds on a dust particle.   Ever notice how dirty stuff is when the snow has melted?  If I had no choice, I would use it.   I might let it settle first after melting it.     

EvaB's picture
EvaB

if you think rain or snow is dirty, you should have seen what came out of my water distiller when I ran tap water through it for a month, I only made my beverages with it, and at the end of the month, I had a quart jar of solids that was taken out of the water. We get out water from a river, its piped miles and miles, and then settled in large ponds (open to birds landing and we live in a goose flyway) and then run through the water treatment plant, chlorine and fluride are added and then its piped into the water system. Sometimes the water is cloudy and they call that turbidity, and tell us its only from the runoff in spring. Did I mention the water runs off of farms, and forests that have animals in them, and machinery cutting down forests etc. We don't have a large untrammeled, area that is kept for water use only.


I'd rather take my chances at the snow and rain thank you kindly.

lynnebiz's picture
lynnebiz

Just be careful about yellow snow.


I have dogs... enough said...

EvaB's picture
EvaB

I simply filter it through a cloth filter, then through the brita and it makes the best coffee, and teas, no other flavours to interfere with the flavour of the tea. I also use it to cook with, its soft water, and had less surface tension and cooks better, this is also why it makes better coffee and tea, the surface tension being less, allows the water to pick up more flavours from the coffee or tea leaves.


If you think it makes better bread, try melting and filtering enough towash your hair with it!


 

BELFAST's picture
BELFAST

many thanks for all your comments   i also use snow melted for my houese plants thats what got me thingking  using tap water on my plants  sad. anyway many thanks to fellow bakers  [ BELFAST ]