The Fresh Loaf

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How to fix a pan that’s prone to burning?

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chiaoapple's picture
chiaoapple

How to fix a pan that’s prone to burning?

How to fix a pan that’s prone to burning?

I have a pretty funkily sized convection oven, so it took me a bit of time to find a rectangular baking dish that would just fill it (to get maximum baking area for rolls and such). The pan is by Baker’s Secret, which is generally well-reviewed. However, it always burns the bottoms of my breads!

Will laying a thick layer of foil on the bottom help with the problem? I’m reluctant to use it before I know of a way to prevent the burning, as I do not want to ruin my bread bottoms!

Any suggestions will be GREATLY appreciated! Thank you!

BROTKUNST's picture
BROTKUNST

Chiaoapple, you operate your convectional oven at a lower temperature then suggested in the formula, right (since most written baking times imply conventional ovens) ? Would it possibly make a positive difference for you if you even lower it a bit more ?

If your bread bottoms actually get 'ruined' and you want to keep using the pan anyway, you may want to consider placing the pan on a cold(er) baking stone as a re-usable shield. But I'd try the lower temperature first ... or maybe a silicone baking sheet could help.

 

I like the Chicago Metallic pans (for enriched doughs like Croissants), line with a silicone sheet. Almost all my other loaves I bake directly on the pre-heated baking stone.

 

BROTKUNST

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Brotkunst mentioned turning down the heat.  Another possibility is that the pan it too big for the oven.  Convection relies on air circulation using a fan and if the air can't circulate, the heat could be building up on the bottom.  There should be at least 2 cm of space around all sides.  If your pan is shiny metal or white (reflects heat) or black (absorbs heat), the color will also affect heat distribution.   Don't quite know what funkily means, can you explain more about the size of your oven?  And on what level (low, middle, high) that you're baking?   If low, try middle.  -- Mini Oven

chiaoapple's picture
chiaoapple

Thanks so much for the feedback!

The baking area of my oven is 12*8 inches, quite small but I've had much success baking either on a baking stone or cookie sheet.

About lowering temperature -- I'll definitely try that! As for allowing air to circulate -- it makes a lot of sense, so I might have to settle for a pan that isn't as snug a fit, and accept that I won't be able to make a full batch of cinnamon rolls at a time.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

you could try taller rolls or make two tea rings.  To make tea rings:  cut your rolled up dough into two pieces and join the ends to make a large donut ring (or oval) shape, then using a scissors, cut from the outside almost to middle, about 8 or more times 3-4cm apart.  Then carefully lift and tilt each roll to show the swirl keeping them all together in the middle.   I think they look like turbines.  Let proof, bake, and glaze.  Looks like a lot of work but with little effort and they like mini ovens.  -- Mini Oven

ooifalu's picture
ooifalu

Ooifalu

Try putting a cookie sheet with about 1/2 to 3/4 inch of water in the bottom of your oven.  This is the way I learned to bake SF french bread.  It seems to keep it from overbrowning and it makes a crispy crust.