The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Persimmon Bread

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LeadDog's picture
LeadDog

Persimmon Bread

We have a persimmon tree and this year I thought I would make Persimmon bread from the fruit.  First I had to find a recipe that I liked and do a trial run to see how the bread tastes.  I found a recipe at this website that I used to make my bread.  http://blog.fatfreevegan.com/2007/11/persimmon-bread.html The first one turned out very tasty but I thought that I should double the recipe and bake the bread in my panettone mold.


Persimmon Bread


Recipe:



 


2 1/2 cups persimmon, mashed pulp.  I put mine in a blender and made a smoothie out of them.  There was a little extra that went into the bread also.


2 tablespoon lemon juice


4 tablespoons olive oil


1 cup plus 4 tbsp. sugar and 4 tbsp. water


1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract


4 cups bread wheat flour


2 teaspoon baking powder


1 teaspoon baking soda


1 teaspoon ginger


1 teaspoon nutmeg 


1/2 teaspoon cloves


1 teaspoon salt


1/2 cup golden raisins


1/2 cup roasted almond pieces


 


Mix the persimmon lemon juice, olive oil, sugar, water, and vanilla extract together.  Then add the flour, baking soda, baking powder, ginger, nutmeg, and cloves.  Then mix until all the flour is moistened.  Add the almonds and raisins and mix them in.


 


Pour into what ever baking pan you are going to use and smooth the top out so it looks nice.


 


Preheat oven to 325°F then cook for 1 1/2 hours.  Let the bread cool completely before cutting.  The glaze was made by melting a thick slice of butter.  Then added a half tablespoon of fruit flavored brandy, an eighth of a teaspoon of Vanilla and Almond extract each.  The glaze is then thickened up by adding powdered sugar until I got the thickness that I wanted.  This glaze is just very wonderful all on its own.  I then placed some sliced Almonds on top of the glaze.  I love the wonderful flavor that the persimmons give to this bread.


 


 

Comments

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Looks great in the panettone mold!  This is beautiful, I wish I had time to go get some persimmons..I want to bake this for my son-n-law...he loves persimmons!  Oh my, 'I had never eaten one before I moved here, growing up in the dessert and living on grocery store produce'...he had some on the counter...they weren't ready ;/...I didn't know about persimmons..and took a big bite...OMGosh, I thought I would croak...then I had a ripe one...oh they are delicious and grow all around here.


Sylvia

LeadDog's picture
LeadDog

Persimmons are a funny fruit.  Our tree doesn't have any leaves on it and the fruit is still getting ripe.  I'm not sure what happens to make them do that.  I know when they look ripe I can freeze them overnight  and when they unthaw they are mushy ripe.  That is my trick to getting persimmons ready to eat.  The pulp freezes well also.  I have my eyes on a persimmon pie recipe for this weekend.  :-)

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

As I drive down the road to my home, avacado's, orange, lemon, pomagrate groves everywhere and then there is this one group of trees with no leaves but orange balls hanging all over it...I finally figured them to be persimmons.  Mike just said the other day..how he liked those orange looking fruits he saw in the store...awww persimmons!  I often see different varieties in my son'n'laws fruit bowls...but I don't know if they are ripe or not..so I don't eat them without asking first. 


Looking forward to your persimmon recipes...I really should bake him something with persimmon.


Sylvia

LeadDog's picture
LeadDog

Persimmon Pie


I made this Persimmon Pie by following this recipe to the letter.  I read somewhere that you can just pull the top off the Persimmon and use a blender to make the pulp.  That is what I did for this pie.  I never knew making a pie could be so easy.  Now to let it cool and see how it tastes.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

The bread looks lovely!


As a kid, there grew this wild persimmon tree on the edge of the wood in South Carolina with small fruit about the size of ping pong balls.  They were not ready to eat until hard frost hit them.  Then we did.  Used to feel like little monsters as we twisted out the tops and sucked them dry, pitching the peel into the ankle deep autumn leaves.  "Dark Shadows" tv vampire soap was popular back then and we had great fun being little fruit vamps.


Persimmons I've seen in different sizes and shapes, some called Sharon fruit or kaki or many other names and there also seems to be a variety and worth asking when the fruit is edible.  I have run into one that is much firmer when ripe than the gooshy ones I love.  They eat more like a crisp apple without the "cotton mouth" green-fruit effect and can be served in wedges or cubed into salads.  They turn brown before they ever get a translucent peel or go soft and are milder.  My husband prefers this neater variety to the messy ones that quench my secret 'blood' thurst from my childhood.  The first one of the season I tend to eat alone over the sink.  In mixed company I've learned to control myself slicing them lengthwise and using a spoon. 


I always have to ask when buying them.

LeadDog's picture
LeadDog

Funny thing Mini we have had plenty of freezing weather this year and I figured the persimmons would be ripe.  I had a hard time finding one with a soft spot.  Seems after doing a little bit of reading that the freezing helps break down the cell walls that causes the puckering mouth sensation.  I like eating them just have never taken the time to eat that many of them.

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Cake looks gorgeous and I have heard persimmons are very aromatic.


We get persimmons in our organic box and I'm never quite sure what to do with them.


One question. How squishy is squishy? I found the persimmons a bit like pears. They were hard, hard, hard and then puddles...I put them in the compost when they turned brownish on the outside. No off smells or anything. Am wondering now if, like bananas, I could have still used them to cook with or whether this would have been a risk? Any advice welcome as they are not a common fruit in the UK.


Best wishes, Daisy_A

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

The best way to tell is just to cut a thin sliver of the firm fruit and taste it. 


If it coats your teeth and mouth it doesn't take long to spit it out and rinse it away.  Then let the fruit ripen until the skin turns translucent and feels soft.  Like a tomato the fragile skin can be rubbed and removed or the fruit can be cut and pulp spooned out.


If it tastes more like a pear and tastes fine, eat it.  Eat them before they turn brown.  I cut them cross ways to find any large seeds.  I will cut off the top brown leafy part and it's up to you if you want to peel it or not.

LeadDog's picture
LeadDog

Daisy persimmons to me taste like some exotic tropical fruit.  The fun thing they don't get ripe until December here when it is good and cold.  I believe they are high in vitamin C also.

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi LeadDog,


Funny thing - only started getting persimmons in our organic box in December also and that's in the frozen tundra of the UK, LOL. Don't think they'll be Californian as our organic box only uses road freight - Morocco maybe? Might get some more then. Will be ready for 'em then - get my catcher's mitts on to get then when they're just right...


Best wishes, Daisy_A

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Mini,


Thanks for your response. I think I did have the firm variety - they were a bit more boxy looking than the others I've seen pictures of. Was just a bit bewildered by them. Seemed to take so long to ripen. I was checking them everyday but then there was so much else going on and they went over. Will try them when they are as you describe above. Thanks for this.


Kind regards, Daisy_A