The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Another Pasta question

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Cooking202's picture
Cooking202

Another Pasta question

I would like to try making whole wheat pasta.  My questions are.....would half all purpose and half WW work well?  Do I need to switch out and use some semalina to replace part of the AP or WW?  Would it help to smooth out the pasta if I soaked the WW for some time before mixing?  Any thoughts or suggestions will be oh so welcome.  Thanks.


Carol 

jim baugh's picture
jim baugh

In my Baguette's and pizza dough, I always use a cup or two of whole wheat. It has better flavor, texture, and is better for you. So, I usually always use it.


I just mix it with my bread flour and high gluten flour equal parts. No big deal at all, works great.


I recently did a WW lasangna noodle, store bought, but it was fantastic. Dont think I will ever go back to white. THe noodle held up better, and tasted better, and is healthier for sure


Jim Baugh

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

Quote:
would half all purpose and half WW work well?

Yes, as long as the WW is finely milled. A coarse, gritty WW flour is not suitable. I routinely make pasta with half AP flour and half whole wheat.
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Quote:
Do I need to switch out and use some semolina to replace part of the AP or WW?

No. Neither semolina or durum flour is necessary to make excellent pasta.
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Quote:
Would it help to smooth out the pasta if I soaked the WW for some time before mixing?

Possibly. The key point here is that whole wheat flour takes longer to absorb liquid than all purpose flour. If you soak your WW flour prior to using it in pasta dough, you will have to adjust your liquid content to allow for that. Alternatively, simply make your pasta dough with both flours and knead in stages. This means knead your dough, then cover it with plastic wrap and let rest for about 15 to 30 minutes. Repeat the knead/rest procedure once or twice more. The resting period allows the WW flour to absorb liquid. You should end up with a smooth, well-kneaded pasta dough.
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When making whole wheat pasta (whether you chose to combine it with AP flour or not), chose a finely milled whole wheat flour. You'll avoid that slightly gritty mouth feel that many commercial whole wheat pastas have.
Another suggestion is to increase your liquid slightly if you're using part (or all) WW flour. WW flour absorbs more liquid than white flour, but takes longer to do so.

Cooking202's picture
Cooking202

Thank you both for your quick response and very helpful advice.  Now I can't wait to make pasta. 


Carol

yy's picture
yy

if you just have regular, as opposed to finely milled whole wheat flour, it might help to put the flour through a fine mesh sieve to filter out the larger, rougher bits of bran.