The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Peter Reinhart's WW Hearth bread

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Mebake's picture
Mebake

Peter Reinhart's WW Hearth bread

This is another bake from "Whole grain breads" of P.Reinhart. It is Whole Wheat Hearth bread.


It is 100% WholeWheat.  70% of WW flour was from a sack of Indian Chakki atta (stone ground flour). I suppose Chakki atta is 96% extraction. Remaining flour was milled from red winter italian wheat, sifted. Therefore, i suppose that this is not entirely 100% ww, but close.


I used 1.5tsp veg. oil instead of butter, and 1.5tsp honey. The crust was chewy, and the crumb was somewhat moist but not dense. THe bread had a sweet wheaty aroma, and the taste was superb. It was indeed one of my best WW breads i have made.




I will definitely make this bread again.


 

Comments

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

And yes, they look like they would well be worth making again.


Paul

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Nice looking loaves. Sounds healthily yummy!


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

Very nice photo and explanation of the flour you use. I buy my Durum flour at an Indian grocery. It is Durum Atta...a perfect semolina flour. Makes great pasta. c


 

Crider's picture
Crider

It's inspiring to see your work because I am learning to bake with whole wheat.

arlo's picture
arlo

Isn't that such a good book? One of my first loaves I baked was the whole wheat hearth bread, and I wish it turned out that well on the first attempt! Haha!


Great job Khalid, glad to see your keeping with the whole grain loaves. It's always wonderful to see what you bake.

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

And terrific loaves Khalid.


FF

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks Paul... you were and are such a help to me and all TFL members.


Thank you Sue! Not also healthy but very very soft tasty whlole wheat.


Thank you Caroline! iam not sure my flour is durum. Or it may be?


Thanks, Crider! Keep reading, keep baking.. you'll eventually get there.


Thanks Arlo for the encouragement! yes, this book makes ww baking much simpler. I am glad i bought the book.

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Wow, those look lovely, Khalid. Such well developed crust and crumb. Thanks for continuing to inspire with your bakes!


Kind regards, Daisy_A

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Such delicious looking loaves of whole wheat. I haven't baked a thing out of that book but after seeing your loaves I'm going to make them my next bake.


Thanks for the inspiration.


weavershouse

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks you Daisy! Iam glad iam inspiring you.. I love whole wheat!


Thank you weaverhouse! Do bake out of this book.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thank you David! thanks for the encouragement all along.

coveloyo's picture
coveloyo

I've made this recipe several times, but have not been as happy with the outcome as you. Aside from the slight variation of honey and oil are there any other changes you have made to the recipe? I usually use my firm sourdough starter instead of the biga, which adds great flavor and rise, but not to the extent of yours. I assume you use the instant yeast in the final dough? I usually do not, which Is your final rise about 45 minutes like stated in the book? maybe I'm proofing for too long and then deflating the loaves when they go in the oven. Any hint's you might have would be greatly appreciated. and again, beautiful work! Joe- northern  california

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hi, Joe! Thanks for the compliment!


As you mentioned, i did use Instant yeast, and i like it that way for many reasons:


The Recipes in WGB call for Instant yeast because they retain or enhance the sweetness of Wholegrain breads without adding sour or lactic acid to the mix.


They are faster to bake, easier to prepare , and make Wholegrain baking so reliable.


They eliminate the "Worrisome" part of having to babysit a starter.


So, if you chose the SD route, you'll have great tasting WG bread, just not as tasty as the recipe intended it to be.