The Fresh Loaf

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Karin's German Feinbrot

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hanseata's picture
hanseata

Karin's German Feinbrot

  Feinbrot - 37% bread flour, 35% whole wheat, 28% rye

SOAKER
192 g whole rye flour
64 g whole wheat flour
4 g salt
192 g water
 
STARTER
195 g whole wheat mother starter (75%) (don't use this high amount of rye starter instead, otherwise the pleasantly tangy bread will be too sour!)
200 g bread flour
120 g water, lukewarm
 
FINAL DOUGH
all soaker and starter
56 g bread flour
10 g salt
1 g bread spice mix (anise, caraway, fennel, coriander)

 

DAY 1
Evening: In 2 separate bowls, mix together soaker and starter ingredients. Cover, and let sit at room temperature overnight.

DAY 2
Morning: Mix together all ingredients for final dough, 1 - 2 min. at low speed (or by hand), until all flour is hydrated and coarse ball forms. Knead 4 min. at medium-low speed. The dough should feel rather tacky. Let rest for 5 min., then knead 1 more min. at medium-low speed. Place dough in lightly oiled container, cover, and let rise at room temperature, approximately 4 - 5 hours, or until it has grown to about 1 1/2 times its original size.

Shape dough into boule, and proof in banneton, seam side up (or down, depending on the pattern you want - the bread on the photo was proofed seam side down, no scoring necessary), at room temperature for ca. 2 - 3 1/2 hrs., or until bread has risen to about 1 1/2 times its original size. (Preheat oven after ca. 2 1/2 hrs.)

Preheat oven to 500 F/260 C, with steam pan and baking stone. Score bread. Bake for 10 minutes at 475 F/246 C, steaming with a cup of boiling water, then lower oven temperature to 425 F/218 C. After 10 more minutes, rotate bread 180 degrees, remove steam pan, and continue baking for another 20 minutes (internal temperature at least 200 F/93 C).

Let bread cool on wire rack


Notes:
BREAD SPICES: put equal amounts of anise, caraway, fennel in a spice mill. (I like to do the spelt variation with coriander only, therefore it is in a separate mill).

VARIATIONS:
Feinbrot with spelt:
Replace rye and whole wheat flour in soaker with 256 g spelt flour, use only coriander instead of spice mix.

Feinbrot with oat: Replace rye in soaker with oat flour.

Feinbrot crumb

Mebake's picture
Mebake

That is delish, Karin!! Yum.. and thanks for the recipe!!


I 'll have to try this some day..! How was the flavor?


 

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Karin, to me this one looks the best out of all your rye breads. Another interesing example of cold rye soaker.


Great, more than usual!

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

probiert !  (Will try this one)


Thank you, Karin,


anna


 


 

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

the whole wheat starter. I have never done a whole wheat starter, does it do as well as A/P flour ?


anna

Vogel's picture
Vogel

This bread looks great! I absolutely love the slightly irregurlar looking scoring on your loaf. I've actually never heard the term "Feinbrot", but after googling I found out that this is a term used in Northern Germany; in the southern areas where I live it would be called something along the lines of "Weizenmischbrot" ("bread made of a blend of a higher portion of wheat and a lower portion of rye").


I am still quite a newbie, so I have a question: What is the purpose of the soaker? I've read a lot of recipes with soakers, but they mostly with shredded grain and/or seeds (so bigger pieces) but not flour. Does this "flour soaker" enhance the flavour or texture in any specific way? I'm really eager to get to know the most basic principles of fermentation and such things, so I find this quite interesting.

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

I copied the recipe and may try to make it soon.


FF

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Khalid: this bread has a distinctive sourdough flavor with a hint of spicyness. If you are only used to sweet-ish American breads (I know you aren't) you might find it too sour. My husband spent part of his childhood in Germany, and this is his favorite bread. My stepdaughters at first thought it looked strange, and tasted too strong. Now they love it, too.


Nico: give it a try (and let me know how it turned out).


Anna: when I first started making this bread i just kept ca. 1 cup of dough as starter for the next bread. At that time I had a bread machine, threw in all the ingredients in the evening, ran the "dough" program, proofed the dough in a banneton overnight and baked it in the morning (works just fine!).


When the machine finally met its maker, I turned to the pre-dough method to make up for the long machine kneading, since I didn't want to buy a new one for just Feinbrot. A whole wheat starter is my "default" starter, though in the meantime I keep a rye starter, too. You can definitely use whatever mature starter you keep, (in case of rye adjust the flour amounts accordingly. The total rye amount should stay the same). Also, nichts wie ran!


Vogel: i must admit the irregular scoring is accidental. I did the "comma" slashes around the rim, but the bridges in between opened by themselves. - Yes, traditionally soakers are used only to soften coarsely ground grains, whole grain berries, or seeds (like flaxseed).


Finely ground flours, of course, don't need much time to hydrate, but soaking them with a little bit of salt also initiates enzyme activity, and helps to release a maximum of flavor. In whole grain breads soaking flour also has another reason. Because of the large amount of fiber in whole grain flour, the sharp edges of the bran can damage the gluten threads. When the flour is soaked, the fibers soften and cause less damage to the structure of the bread (it rises better).


I very much recommend my favorite whole grain baking book: Peter Reinhart's "Whole Grain Breads". I baked nearly every bread from it, and many of those I sell - with some variations and adjustments (less sweetener, addition of bread spices etc.).


Frequent Flyer: Please do!


Karin


 


 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Karin,


Yes, I would expect this to be sour, as you note for Khalid.   The pre-fermented flour adds up to 50%.


I agree with Nico.   You have posted some great recipes on TFL; this one is the best to me.


Best wishes


Andy

Vogel's picture
Vogel

Now I have gained some new bits of knowledge. I will try to work with the soaker next time I make a rye bread.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

will get you everywhere, thanks, Andy! Especially since you are one of the TFL sages!


I'm quite proud of this bread, because I really developed it myself with trying it over and over again.


The temperature settings (preheat to 500, bake 10 min. at 475, and then reduce to 425 F) achieve a better crust, thin and crisp, than the one Peter Reinhart suggests for similar breads in WGB (whole wheat, transitional wheat, multigrain and transitional rye hearth breads - preheat to 500 F and bake at 450 F), resulting in a much thicker crust.


Karin


 

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

do you think I could run them through the coffee mill and use spelt that way ?


anna

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Anna, I never tried to grind spelt in a coffee mill. I once tried to grind rye in a food processor and just got a little dust off, nothing else. I buy my flours in bulk, but I got a  "Wondermill Junior" for making coarse grinds of spelt, wheat and barley that you usually can't buy anywhere (I don't use it for grinding flour, it's hand powered and that takes forever).


But if your coffee mill works - why not.


Karin

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

I need to order the right stuff :)

ananda's picture
ananda

I'll take the "sage" comment as a compliment; thanks Karin!


Given I have a prize-winning student who used nettles in her bread recipe, there seems to be a medicinal herb connection going on.   The starting point for her formula came from your original post on blue fenugreek, I do believe.?


It's here, anyway: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20318/young-baker-competition-half-term-home-baking   


I know the spices used are very different, but Faye put loads of work into this bread, and she knew exactly what she wanted from it too!


There is a lot of great information regarding soakers on Nico's post, here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20245/cold-rye-soaker#comment-140749    More thoughts on hot soakers: mashing is of course very interesting as a means to extract sweetness, and the enzymes should, of course live on.   However, the use of boiling water will raise the temperature too high for the enzymes.   Additionally it will cook the flour.   Not only does this de-nature the protein, as you rightly state, it also allows the starch molecules to burst open and take up a load of extra liquid; gelatinisation.   It's a good trick for getting extra water into a formula, and it creates chewy and close textured breads...usually white I have to say.   I'm thinking Italian-style!   Maybe Nico might comment on that, although we are in "rye-free" territory here!


Protein de-naturation is great for some things too...eg. Hot Water Pastes.   I've also done demonstrations of choux paste to students relating to how the degree of cooking the flour impacts on the amount of egg the roux will subsequently take up once cooled.   All these are really key principles to grasp.   I also like your comment above, to vogel that the soaking [cold] softens the bran and lessens the damage to the gluten network in the mixed dough.


Best wishes


Andy

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I left a comment on your thread and copied all four recipes. (One can never have enough of recipes with stout, anyway).


It's really hard work to constantly eat against an overflowing freezer... and the next recipe is always beckoning!


Karin


 

Yumika's picture
Yumika

I've been baking bread for years using mostly instant yeast, but occasionally wild yeast starters. I still am a novice where it comes to German sauerteig breads. The Feinbrot recipe looks fantastic. OK, now I have this starter made up with 2 cups flour and 1 cup water. My question is probably dumb, but how do you derive a 195 gram, 75% mother starter from this? Thanks for any pointers!

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

...to make 195 g 75% hydrated starter from yours, take 179 g (about 2/3 cup) of your starter and add 18 g (2 tablespoons) flour.  

FF

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Thanks, FF, for your help here.

Yumika, you can also always adjust the final dough with more flour or water, it should feel tacky to the touch, not too sticky.

I will update the post, because in the meantime I baked a Feinbrot with a rye starter instead of my default whole wheat one, and found the bread too sour for my taste.

Good luck with the bread, and I hope you will like it, Yumika.

Happy New Year,

Karin

Yumika's picture
Yumika

I made the bread with a starter of half rye and half WW flour. The starter must have been too wet, because I had to add an additional 100 grams of flour. The second rise may have been a tad too short and the bread turned out a little more compact than I think it should have, BUT it was a really delicious sour bread! I baked 20 minutes with steam (Toshiba steam oven) on a pizza stone, but had to extend the baking at 220 C with 15 minutes. Different oven, larger loaf, you see. Next time I am sure to improve on this first attempt at Karin's Feinbrot.

Happy New Year to all of you out there!

Yumika

hanseata's picture
hanseata

to hear your first attempt at Feinbrot turned out so well, Yumika. My baking time is a total of 40 minutes, anyway, rotating the bread after 20 minutes.
You should always aim at a dough that is rather too sticky than too dry. Better err on the wet side.

Karin

Yumika's picture
Yumika

my oven needs calibrating. My  first attempt at Feinbrot turning out as well as it did is entirely thanks to your clear instructions. I am grateful to all who share their recipes. Recipes that took a lot of time and effort to develop!

hanseata's picture
hanseata

In this bread I really take pride, because I did develop it all by myself.

Happy Baking,

Karin

Yumika's picture
Yumika

do you use? I've been using plastic colanders, but now I'm considering getting a wicker basket for the Feinbrot. Can't decide whether to choose a 19 cm or 22 cm diameter.

Yumika

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I have both, but I use the smaller one more often. The Feinbrot fits in the 19 cm diameter one just fine.

Karin

Yumika's picture
Yumika
Tinabean's picture
Tinabean

Karin, thank you for responding to my Bauernbrot question on the Challenges forum. Yes, I know Bauernbrot is a generic term for good old bread and that everyone has their own special version. I think it's the spongy fine texture I am going after. Your picture looks great. I will definitely have to give this one a try this evening. The mix I picked up in Germany last month definitely was a good one, so I am trying to copy that. 

All my family is in Germany and I visit them every so often. My favorite Broetchen are from a bakery in a little town not far from Herford; the ones I had recently in Nuernberg not so good. Probably bakery versus supermarket makes a big difference. Favorite Bauernbrot came from a village east of Kassel.

I will try your recipe exactly, except I think I will leave out the bread spices the first try. I do have a jar but want to see how the bread tastes first without it.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

You might want to check out some excellent German bread baking blogs:

Bernd's Bakery (German and English)

Der Brotdoc

Plötzblog

Ketex - der Hobbybäcker

These have fantastic recipes, and, if you speak some German, you will find them a great resource. (I would help with translations , too).

Happy baking,

Karin

Tinabean's picture
Tinabean

Karin, how should the soaker look like? I followed your amounts and it is very stiff. I have never done a soaker before so do not know how it should be.

Thanks!

hanseata's picture
hanseata

The soaker will be somewhat stiff. The flour should be all hydrated, but that is all. If you find it unmanageable (flours can always differ, add a little more water. 

In the final dough you can always adjust with a little more water or flour, to end up with a tacky, but not overly sticky dough.

Good luck, and please, let me know what you think!

Karin

Tinabean's picture
Tinabean

The soaker mellowed some overnight and mixed easily with the starter. Amazing how the dough just flopped around the mixer in chunks for awhile and then all of a sudden it all came together and made a nice dough. Probably a little too moist but I kept with your recipe and didn't add any more flour. Doubled in 4 hours, then in three. Forgot to score the loaf, but it looks very nice. Just out of the oven. I will have to distract myself with something else until it cools enough to cut!

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Karin  :)

Yumika's picture
Yumika

I am confused about this:

Bake at 270 degree directly from the fridge for 10 minutes with steam. Reduce heat to 240 degree for 10 minutes and finish at 200 degree. Release steam after 15 minutes an bake with slightly open oven door the last 10 minutes

Direkt aus dem Kühlschrank in den 270 Grad heissen Ofen mit viel Dampf einschiessen

Nach 10 Minuten auf 240 Grad reduzieren und nach weiteren 10 Minuten auf 200 Grad fertigbacken. Den Dampf nach etwa 15 Minuten ablassen und die letzten 10 Minuten mit leicht geöffneter Ofentür backen

Does this mean a total baking time of 45 minutes and 35 minutes with steam?

I'd appreciate your comment!

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Yumika, that is a bit confusing, indeed!

I think he must mean 45 minutes total baking time. Can you give me a link to the original post?

Karin

Yumika's picture
Yumika

Thank you for your response, Karin. Here is the link: http://berndsbakery.blogspot.ca/2013/10/saaten-bio-sauerteig-brot-organic-seed.html

Yumika's picture
Yumika

is a variation I concocted - well, anyone could have done that. I just mixed in 1 cup of lightly toasted and chopped pecan nuts and 1 cup of cranberries. Very tasty my family agrees with me!

Feinbrot with nuts and craisins

Yumika's picture
Yumika

[Don't know how to edit posts]

hanseata's picture
hanseata

That looks very nice, Yumika. I love nuts in bread. I'm you like it. I haven't baked Feinbrot for a while, but should do it again, and then I will add nuts, too.

Yumika's picture
Yumika

what have you been baking, Karin?

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I always like trying something new (though I have some favorites), but these I made recently:

Kamut Sunflower Pumpkin Seed Levain:


 

(Best ever) English scones:

 

Eckbrötchen - Corner Rolls (from Lutz Geissler's "Das Brotbackbuch")

Yumika's picture
Yumika

I really like the look of that bread! I have been using Dinkel (Spelt) in my breads. Most recently in Thurgauer Bodensee brot. This flour has a nutty flavor, maybe not unlike Kamut, although I have yet to try the latter.

The scones and rolls look delicious too :-)

Yumika's picture
Yumika

could you point me to the Kamut bread recipe or is this another of your original breads?

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Check this out, Yumika: Einkorn Hazelnut Levain.

It is basically the same bread, but substitute the Einkorn flour with Kamut flour, and the nuts with half toasted sunflower seeds and half pumpkin seeds.

Both versions taste very good.