The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Lionel Vatinet on Dough Mixing

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SteveB's picture
SteveB

Lionel Vatinet on Dough Mixing

For those who are unable to attend a professionally-taught bread baking class, the next best thing, an excellent discussion of the three major dough mixing techniques by Lionel Vatinet, can be found here (you may have to sign on to the Modern Baking website, but signing on is free and the article is well worth it).


 


SteveB


www.breadcetera.com

Franko's picture
Franko

Thanks Steve!


Excellent article on the differences of the four mixing methods. Very informative.

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Oops... you are quite right Franko.  There are four major mixing methods (hand mix, short mix, improved mix and intensive mix), not three, as I originally posted.


 


SteveB


www.breadcetera.com 

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Steve, 


Many thanks for flagging up this article. It drew together lots of different types of information on mixing that I had come across and was trying to think through. It summarized and exemplified them very clearly - which I guess is what makes a good class!


I'm also always happy also to have the merits of hand mixing praised as it is the only kind of mixing I do...


I take it when talking about artisan breads he is still referring primarily to yeasted doughs, however, because 3 hour primary fermentation seems short for some sourdoughs?


Kind regards, Daisy_A

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Hi Daisy,


In the article, Vatinet is using only straight doughs (no preferments of any kind) for his comparisons.


 


SteveB


www.breadcetera.com

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Steve,


Thanks - got the drift. I do like to do straight doughs now and again but mostly working with pre-ferments and sourdough at the moment.


However this article also gave me some insights into how I might hand mix a sourdough (with later supportive S&F), to give the dough sufficient but not too much initial development in order to sustain long fermentation or retardation. 


I've come across a wealth of good information on S&F with hand mixing but not as much on initial hand mixing. Sure it must be out there somewhere, however a lot of information for professionals tends to refer to an initial machine mix.


Made me feel better about being a hand-mixing baker also!


Thanks for posting, Daisy_A


 

genem5329's picture
genem5329

Attended one of Lionel's Italian bread classes at his bakery LaFarm last week.  Great class.  Wow what an operation he has.  I fell in love with his monsterous oven.  Just today I spent about a half hour with Lionel being instructed on recording everything from water temp. to time between each operation in the process of learning to bake.  He stopped in at the Olde Village Restaurant where I bake in Southport NC.  He has in-laws here so I may get personal toutering from time to time.  He is an amazing teacher, has me recording everything so I can feed it back to him when we next meet, probably Dec. 2 at his Bakery (Cary NC).  I was hoping to attend a class somewhere, but this is soooo much more personal, and it beats traveling to France.


Gene