The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Whats your favourite Sourdough recipe?

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HokeyPokey's picture
HokeyPokey

Whats your favourite Sourdough recipe?

Hi all

 I am quite new to this website, and I am addicted! I can't go a day without checking the site.

I have two starters going - white and rye, and looking for exciting recipes to try them out with.

Whats your all time favourite sourdough recipes?

HK

BROTKUNST's picture
BROTKUNST

I am not sure about the 'favourite' formula but Thom Leonard's Country French Sourdough (M. Glezer, Artisan Baking) is certainly very good with KA's 'First Clear' flour. I bake it under La Cloche (hot) and on a hot baking stone ... in my experience this is in general best and most reliable way to achieve a great ovenspring combined with full, picture perfect control over the appearance and texture of the crust (gold to deep brown as desired, crunchy or softer crust). The formula is originally for a 4 lbs loaf  ... I bake three, one at a time (2# /1# /1#) in different shapes and adjust the time in the oven.By the way, I find that a 2-day-old white Barm works splendid (still) and I like to retard the dough overnight during the first fermenttion (in the refridgerator).There is a write-up in this forum with the formula for this loaf (see 'search' feature) ... it's worth though to buy M.Glezer's book 'Artisan Baking'. It's out as Paperback (unfortunately not Harcover anymore) and very inexpensive.BROTKUNST

HokeyPokey's picture
HokeyPokey

Artisan Baking sounds good - I just got  my BAA and I am loving it, still waiting for my Village Baker from Amazon. Its been almost two months - very frustrating!

What do you think of Nancy S books?

 

HK

BROTKUNST's picture
BROTKUNST

Dan Lepard's book (Art of Handmade Bread) is very good, heavy on natural leavening formulas. Nacy S.'s book is quite alright .. just received it this week, so I'll have to get a better judgement by trying out some formulas.  The breads she introduces appear to be very interesting though. (She came out with a sandwich (panini) book that we like.)

I am also waiting for the Villla Baker from Amazon ... Do you know Hamelman's 'Bread' book. I like it; detailed formulas and good descriptions. I am also reading R. Calvel's 'The taste of Bread'. That's  more a study book for a culinary school, but still very accessable, I think. It contains valuable information, however for a price tag that may not convince the broad public to buy this book. Probably it's also not necessary because other good books cover in some depth what you need or want to know.

The only book I can definitely not recommend is 'Secrets of a Jewish Baker' ... it just came out and is not worth the paper it's printed on. The author is for sure a great baker, but he must be estranged to scales and baker's math. His formulas casually call for '2 1/2 to 4 cups' of flour ... you'd be all over the place with your hydration percentage when you get instructions like that.

Well, although I repeat myself, but try Dan Lepard's book ... he came up with very interesting formula's that are interesting and fun to try. Plus it's rather inexpensive. The only drawback is that it's only available as paperback which is a shame for a good book.

BROTKUNST

Squid's picture
Squid

I have to say that my favorite sourdough recipe is Nancy Silverton's Rosemary Olive Oil Bread. I've stopped trying different recipes since I first made that bread.

HokeyPokey's picture
HokeyPokey

I've been thinking about ordering her book.

I saw her video on Julia Child website - a strter from grapes - looks really good.

 

HP

Squid's picture
Squid

I like her book. You don't have to make her starter to use her recipes, just FYI. I made her starter, but I actually use an Italian starter from Sourdough International that I really like.

 

Squid's picture
Squid

How long does it take for your ovens to heat up? I'm not sure I could try this method b/c it takes my oven a good 45 minutes to reach 500F.