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Alternative acidity scale in degrees?

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Lucifer's picture
Lucifer

Alternative acidity scale in degrees?

Digging into an authentic Borodinsky bread recipe. It has suggested acidity level in "degrees". I came across this scale in other russian recipies before.


Does anyone know how it works?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

which is more than likely.  "Degree" is listed in the Thesarus under "scale." 


Or they are using degrees in reference to temperature or activity.  pH measuring is very important in sourdough but pH readings also vary according to temperature.  Could also be they are listing the dough temperature ... as 25°C.    That is why pH measuring devices can get expensive.   They have to take this into account.  Like matching a strait line to an arch in results, may have to do with activity of hydrogen atoms and logarithms with theoretical calculations.  It gets all too complicated for me. 


I stick to the recognized pH scale of 0 to 14.  Readings of 0 being acid and 14 a base with 7 as neutral.


Mini

Lucifer's picture
Lucifer

Too true.


Apparently it's the amount of normalised NaOH required to neutralise the acidity. Wonder if it's used anywhere else in chemistry.

jeremiahwasabullfrog's picture
jeremiahwasabullfrog

"Apparently it's the amount of normalised NaOH required to neutralise the acidity. Wonder if it's used anywhere else in chemistry."


nope.


In any case, the number of moles of NaOH consumed is basically the same as the concentration of hydrogen ions, sometimes of course this number is useful, but the pH scale is just a better way of saying the same thing, as it covers hydrogen ion concentrations from 1 M to 0.00000000000001 M on a nice neat scale of 0 - 14.


 


 


 


 

Lucifer's picture
Lucifer

The numbers given are for example 13-16, 8-12, 9-11.


Wonder if there is a simple conversion.

jeremiahwasabullfrog's picture
jeremiahwasabullfrog

so those pairs of numbers are ranges? As in "between 13 and 16"?


If you can give me a little more info about the scale I can give you the conversion.


For eg, you said it was related to the amount of standardised NaOH consumed? Standardised to what concentration, and consumed by what quantity of acid etc.

jeremiahwasabullfrog's picture
jeremiahwasabullfrog

I'm curious too, what so the numbers relate to? pH of starter?

Lucifer's picture
Lucifer

I wish I knew, Jeremia!


The numbers are the required range of acidity at different stages.


I don't know what "normalised" mean in this case. There is probably some standard for this. I thought this scale was commonly used in chemistry or food technology. No one here even heard about it.


It is commonly used in RU. I remember seeing a very interesting armenian cheese recipe that required for acidity built up going all the way to "90" on the same scale. Never figured what "90" means and the cheese never came out right.


Heck knows.

jeremiahwasabullfrog's picture
jeremiahwasabullfrog

"normalised" means they made up a batch of NaOH to about the right concentration and then checked it against an acid solution of known concentration so they know the concentration of NaOH accurately.


If you knew what concentration it was normalised to, and how much was used, you'd have some idea of what it all means! So unless there is something in the appendix of the book (which there really should be), then it sounds like the best you can say for now is that higher numbers mean more acid (the opposite of the pH scale).


Do you have a way to measure pH of dough anyway?


Hope you can get some use out of the recipes.