The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bertinet's Beer Bread (Slightly modified)

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foodslut's picture
foodslut

Bertinet's Beer Bread (Slightly modified)

I've tried Bertinet's beer poolish bread in the past (also seen here), so I thought I'd try a bit of a variation on the theme - adding just a bit more non-white flour.


Here's the formula I ended up developing:



  • AP flour                85

  • WW flour                  5

  • Dark rye flour          5

  • Whole spelt flour     5

  • Water                    54

  • Beer                      14

  • Salt                        1

  • Instant yeast        0.5


Based on that formula, I calculated these figures (PDF) for 3 x 750g/24oz loaves of bread.  Here's the beer I used for the poolish, a darkish Alexander Keith's Red Amber Ale:



I prepared the poolish and let it develop at room temperature for 11 hours overnight, then mixed it with the rest of the ingredients and let it all ferment for about 90 minutes (it was about doubled in volume).  Shaped the loaves, let them proof another 90 minutes, slash, then into the oven - 500F with steam (ketchup bottle water squirt X 2 to the oven walls) for 5 minutes, then down to 400F for another 40 minutes.  Loaves came out with an internal temperature of between 200F and 205F.


Here's the results:




Nice grain flavour, with only the very slightest hint of beer taste.  Nicer crumb than I've had in similar breads I've done.  I'm planning on trying this toasted on a grill with raw garlic rubbed on it, followed by some olive oil and salt, with home-made pasta tonight.

Comments

Franko's picture
Franko

It looks great and I like your choice of beer as well.

foodslut's picture
foodslut

...and it was good, but I wanted to see how much of a difference (if any) it would make with a stronger brew.

Franko's picture
Franko

Much as I like Keith's Red, you might consider Kilkenny next time if your looking for a stronger ale flavour. It's Irish and quite dark, just a little bitter, but with a more complex overall flavour.


Franko

foodslut's picture
foodslut

I'll have to try a batch with Kilkenny.