The Fresh Loaf

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Time for Onion Tarte - Zeit fuer Zwiebelkuchen

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hanseata's picture
hanseata

Time for Onion Tarte - Zeit fuer Zwiebelkuchen


Fall is the time of the year when Alsatians and wine loving Germans think: "Zwiebelkuchen"! For this mellow sweet onion pastry is the perfect companion to new wine.

If you travel in fall through the wine growing areas left and right of the Rhine, you will find inns, restaurants and many vinyards offering sparkling new wine (Federweisser). They often serve it together with freshly baked Zwiebelkuchen (Onion Tarte) or, an equally tasty variation, Porreekuchen (Leek Tarte).

But beware - Onion Tarte is an aider and abetter of that seemingly feathery light youngster, helping it go down so smoothly, that you are tempted to drink it like lemonade! When you wake up the next morning you realize why Federweisser is also called: "Sauser" (Buzzer) - there's something buzzing in your stomach and your head is spinning...


You find the recipe for Zwiebelkuchen or Leek Tarte here: http://hanseata.blogspot.com/2010/09/zwiebelkuchen-onion-or-leek-tarte.html


  Leek Tarte

Comments

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci

Having lived in Germany I know very well about "Sauser".  The tart looks delicious. I've also had them in the Alsace where they are very famous and the Lorraine. I have to admit I'm not big on savory tarts, but love Zwiebelkuchen. Often when we drove from Switzerland to Germany we stopped overnight somewhere in the Alsace and enjoyed Zwiebelkuchen.


Regards,


Patricia

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

It is such a pretty tart!  I love the flavor of leeks!!


Sylvia

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Patricia, you are right - the nice thing about the Zwiebelkuchen is its mellow sweetness (a natural one from the onion). I find it highly addictive, same as the slightly stronger tasting leek variation. These are also some of my party staples, you can also do them on a baking sheet (3 x ingredients) for a larger crowd.


Sylvia, it's hard to decide which variation taste better. My husband prefers the Leek Tarte and I love both. I planted some leeks this year, but they were overwhelmed and beaten down by the kohlrabis, broccolis and cauliflowers - my fault, I planted them too dense. So I had to come up with a lot of cabbage-y recipes, and I don't know whether we will manage to "eat them down".


Karin

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Karin,


I've always loved onion tarts ever since I had one at Le Crocodile restaurant in Vancouver B.C.                                                                       http://lecrocodilerestaurant.com/


This one was in the Alsace style but not that much different from yours...which looks wonderful! I've made 2 or 3 myself over the years but never was able to duplicate the one from Le Croc. If I remember correctly it was made with a pate brisee rather than pate feuillette and used bacon instead of ham, but other than that, yours and Chef Jacob's seem very similar. Thanks so much for sharing your recipe with us. I'm really looking forward to making it.


ATB,


Franko

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Franko, in my friend Andrea's original recipe it is "Rohschinken", cured ham, but I already used cooked and smoked ham, domestic prosciutto, speck, and, also bacon. All tasted just fine.


I'm sure you can use pate brisee, too, but the frozen puff pastry is an easy and quick way to do it at home, and tastes very good.


Anyway, there are a lot of different recipes for Zwiebelkuchen, the leek version was added by me, because I like leeks and it is as good as the onion version.


Karin


 

Corinaesq's picture
Corinaesq

In Schwabeland (southwestern Germany), where my father was born and raised, Zwiebelkuchen is always made with a yeast base, served, of course, with new wine at a"Besenwirtschaft," which translates to "broom inn." I have no idea why it's called that, but they are usually at the home of the vintner, or in a winery building, under a temporary license to sell food (usually 2 weeks).  It is communal seating only, and people are usually singing and/or talking loudly. It is a lovely tradition, even if the food is not always hot or plentiful enough!

Dillbert's picture
Dillbert

it gets its name from:


when locals had gruenewein to sell, they'd hang out a broom as a "signal"


barn, shed, house - whatever - in season a broom meant fizzy wine.  the onion cake was traditionally a side dish to a very regional/local/seasonal specialty drink.


"licenses" is a more recent tradition....


Karin's recipe sounds wonderful, but it's always been the crust/schwiebeln combo I've not mastered and a frozen puff pastry sheet is not what I'm looking for.  yeasted shell sounds good - need to play with that.


I think I've lost my ability to schweitz Schwab - but I know one when I hear one!

Corinaesq's picture
Corinaesq

Here is my recipe for Zwiebelkuchen, the way the Schwaebisch make it:


Zwiebelkuchen (Onion Tart)



  • Mix yeast, sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, and ½ cup flour. Blend in softened butter and warm water. Beat for 2 minutes. Add enough flour to make a soft dough. Knead dough until smooth and elastic, about 5 minutes. Place dough in a lightly greased bowl. Cover and let dough rise in a warm place for ½ hour.






  • Pat dough into a lightly greased 12-inch pizza pan or quiche pan. Press up edges to make a slight rim. Fry bacon until crisp. Remove from grease and drain on paper towels. Add onions to bacon grease; cook slowly until tender but not brown. Sprinkle onion, bacon, cumin, ½ teaspoon salt and pepper over dough. Bake at 400 degrees for 20 minutes. Blend egg yolk and sour cream; add caraway seeds. Pour over onions. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes longer or until golden brown and sour cream is set.






  • Serve warm or at room temperature.






  • Alternative: Instead of making your own dough, try using Grands biscuits instead. Roll out each biscuit to a 6-in. round and proceed as above, except bake the biscuits covered with onion mixture for only 5 minutes; add the egg mixture and bake for another 5 to 7 minutes.



hanseata's picture
hanseata

for Dillbert! This recipe sounds very good, too! It must have a much thicker onion filling than my version.


Thanks, Corinaesq!


 

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Karin,


Made this - following on link from other thread!


My tucking in of puff pastry was a bit ragged - not so much used to that as a UK baker as I am to shortcrust, however it was nice and golden.


Have done similar cream and egg mixture with orchard mushroom tart recipe, however so was on more familiar territory there,. which was good. iIlling came out puffed up and golden brown - hope you can see!


Tasted delicious. Thanks for posting.



Kind regards, Daisy_A

hanseata's picture
hanseata

your tarte turned out, Daisy, and I'm glad you liked it!


My recipe program is already filled with all kind of interesting TFL recipes - but right now I'm fasting, and any bakery for myself has to wait until the weekend.


Karin


 

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Thanks Karin.


I hope the fast is going well.  With kind regards, Daisy_A

hanseata's picture
hanseata

It's going quite well. We do it once or twice a year to detox, get rid of some pounds - and, also, my husband gets less migraines for several months.


Karin

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Karin,


Good that it has such positive effects. I like autumn but I do think it is also a good thing to do at this time of year, with all the changes in the weather.


Kind regards, Daisy_A