The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Which Salt and Which Sugar?

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CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

Which Salt and Which Sugar?

 

Yes I have read many of the books but I would like to know which kind of salt and sugar the experienced veterans use? Thanks.

sphealey's picture
sphealey

> which kind of salt and sugar

> the experienced veterans use

What about those of us who are semi-experienced beginners? Of course Tom Kyte, Vice-President of Technology at Oracle Corporation, says "I learn something new about Oracle every day" and under that standard I imagine I will be a breadbaking beginner for the rest of my life.

Anyway, over the course of a week I use about 2/3 french grey sea salt (our local grocery stores just started carrying a brand that is much more cost-effective than Penzey's) and 1/3 standard Morton's iodized salt. I use some Morton's to be sure we are getting enough iodine in our diet I do think there is a slight bitterness from the iodine but it isn't a big problem for me or my family and it is not noticable in soft breads with sugar and fat in them.

When I need granulated sugar I use a popular brand organic cane sugar; I doubt it is really any different from standard white granulated but it only cost 50 cents/bag more and it makes me feel studlier.

However, for the most part when I need a sugar I use an organic Rhode Island semi-solid honey, and I can very much taste the difference (both in the honey and the resulting bread) between that and standard processed liquid honey.

sPh

Cliff Johnston's picture
Cliff Johnston

I used to think, "What difference can there possibly be among cane sugars?"  After reading a newspaper "filler-type" article that some scientist made on organic sugar vs, factory spray-and-fertilizer-grown sugar I changed to organic sugar.   I don't have a copy of the article, but I recall that he found more beneficial trace minerals in the organic sugar.  Who'd a thunk it?

As for salt, I've been using sea salt for years.  When we moved recently I ran out and bought some Morton's Iodized salt in a pinch.  What a nasty difference.  Everyone complained.  I went to Wal-Mart and found an iodized sea salt which eased the pain of our move even more.  Now, this makes me wonder, "Why the difference?"  After all the salt domes that provide the salt for Morton's and others were once part of the seas too.  Perhaps something happens to salt dome salt over the years to change it, after all it is under tremendous pressure, etc..  Anyone have a more complete answer for this?

Cliff. Johnston
"May the best you've ever seen,
 Be the worst you'll ever see;"
from A Scots Toast by Allan Ramsay

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

Well sphealey, the term experienced veterans applies to all those who have been baking longer than I have and I started last December.  So, for the record all I do is read the bread books, bake bread, and read this forum-which I happen to think is fantastic.  I would love to know what FloydM and SourdoLady would answer to this question but we can't bug them on all our questions.  In the meantime, all experienced veterans are welcome to provide their guidance.  Thanks......suddenly the simple things are not so simple anymore.

sphealey's picture
sphealey

> Well sphealey, the term experienced veterans applies

> to all those who have been baking longer than I have

> and I started last December.


December 2006 you mean? Then I qualify!

sPh

PS I can't make the formatter turn off that bold italic which was copied over when I did a cut and paste.

magnum's picture
magnum

About salt. Sea salt and kosher salt are flakes that dissolve, better for baking. table salt stays in its cubic form and gives a more salty taste