The Fresh Loaf

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Jason's Quick Coccodrillo Ciabatta Bread

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hydestone's picture
hydestone

Jason's Quick Coccodrillo Ciabatta Bread

This stuff looks great and I'd love to take a crack at it, never made ciabatta before.  Anyone ever make this stuff without a mixer?

rick.c's picture
rick.c

I have made this several times with a mixer. it basically is running a KA mixer at full speed for 8-10 min to get the gluten developed enough.  I don't know how you would do this by hand.  If you have a handheld mixer, you could try to use that, it wouldn't hurt, or grab a wisk and go to town.  In any event, when one of thise 2 is getting difficult, you are going to have to do stretch and folds constantly in order to get the gluten developed.  I might hold back some of the yeast in order to give you more time to get the gluten developed.  Good luck though, 

marlnock's picture
marlnock

Hi, this is my first posting on the forum as i've just gotten into bread making.  One of the first breads i wanted to learn to make was ciabatta and, whilst searching the net i stumbled across the recipe you're talking about.


I chose the semolina variation of the recipe on this page http://groups.google.com/group/alt.bread.recipes/browse_thread/thread/ad0e477790ef4f03/a644f520f4b3cd48?rnum=2


The advantage of this version of the Cocodrillo ciabatta is that you only need to kneed for 10 mins.


So in the absence of a mixer, i took to the glop with a large flat wooden spoon and kneeded it like i would by hand.  I had to rest a few times, but sure enough, after about 10 mins of kneeding with the wooden spoon it developed that beautiful glutenous texture we all love.


I cooked the loaves on a pizza stone and they were a raging success, passing my highest expectations. the crumb was nice and wide and the oven rise was incredible.


So, in summary, it's definitely doable by hand (well by wooden spoon!)

alabubba's picture
alabubba

If you mix flour and water and just let it set, gluten will magically develop. This is the secrete of all the "No Kneed" type breads.


I have made this recipe many times without a mixer. The long rising period helps with the gluten development. Remember to watch the dough, not the clock.


Mix everything in a large bowl and when you cant mix with your wooden spoon just dig right in. There was a video of how to mix very wet dough with your hands somewhere. I will see if I can find it for you.


 


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4365/kneading-slack-dough-hand

Joe the baker's picture
Joe the baker

Using the Autolyse method, do you intially mix all the ingredients from the start, or do you wait to add the salt and yeast ofter forst or second resting period of the autolyse method?


Joe

alabubba's picture
alabubba

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/lessons/tentips_8_autolyse


Just flour and water and time... Ain't science cool ;O)

Joe the baker's picture
Joe the baker

Science is cool.   Thanks for your response.  However,at what point do you add the other ingredients? 


Joe

Joe the baker's picture
Joe the baker

Science is cool.   Thanks for your response.  However,at what point do you add the other ingredients? 


Joe

alabubba's picture
alabubba

After the autolyse.


Mix your flour and water together, cover and let rest for 30 minutes to 45 min, then add your yeast and salt, and continue as normal.


Allan

Joe the baker's picture
Joe the baker

When using the autolyse method, do you mix in all the ingredients initially, or do you mix in the salt and yeast after the first or second rest period of Autolyse?


Joe the baker

sheffield's picture
sheffield (not verified)