The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Baking Cakes in Glass Pans

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alpinegroove's picture
alpinegroove

Baking Cakes in Glass Pans

Is it possible / advisable to bake cakes in pyrex pans? I am trying to veer away from using non-stick coatings and thought that glass pans might be an alternative.


Would I need to alter temperatures or anything else about the recipe?


Thanks!


 

lief's picture
lief

I have both a pyrex and a metal non-stick coated loaf pan, and I must say that I am much more partial to the non-stick pan.  I have a problem with the bread sticking to the pyrex pan if it is a lean dough, even if I oil the loaf pan well.

jeremiahwasabullfrog's picture
jeremiahwasabullfrog

I know what you mean about avoiding teflon. I try to do the same. Just bear in mind though that baking cakes in teflon is not nearly so bad as frying, or even a teflon pizza dish. The reason being that the worst effects of teflon are when it gets to a temperature that is somewhere aaround 250C from memory. You've no doubt looked into it and this probably isn't news to you. I don't use teflon for anything else, but I do still have a teflon cake pan.


cakes have enouh butter that you should be OK in glass. In any case you can separate it from the side of the dish with a knife, and put something on the bottom to help there. Just bear in mind that some non-stick papers use a teflon like coating.


 


All the best!


 

thegrindre's picture
thegrindre

You'll need to grease up those glass 'pans' pretty well. Maybe even use a little flour. I do. I use parchment paper for everything but haven't used it on a cake before. It may work just fine, also.


I understand your concern about Teflon. After reading about the excessive amounts of aluminum in the brains of alzheimer's patients, I threw all my aluminum cookware out the door. It, too, gives off a gas at certain temps.


I only use stainless steel, now.


 


Rick

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

You have to reduce your oven temperature by 25 deg.F. when you use Pyrex, or glass, pans.