The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

How in the world do you cover wet dough???

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thegrindre's picture
thegrindre

How in the world do you cover wet dough???

Hi all,


I have an English Muffin Bread recipe that calls for a very very wet dough. Almost like a batter.


How do you cover this type of dough, for the final rise in the pan, without ripping off the top layer and ruining the whole loaf while removing the wet towel as suggested???


 


Thanks,


Rick

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

take a piece of plastic wrap and lay flat on work surface, drip a teaspoon of oil on it and smear it around for a fine coat.  Lay the oil side down on the dough to cover. 


or invert another pan the same size over the tray.

verminiusrex's picture
verminiusrex

I have a bus tub that is big enough to fit over my sheet pan and tall enough that the loaves won't hit the top, I just invert it over my dough for the final rise. You can use a clear plastic storage box too. The seal doesn't have to be air tight, just enough to keep it from drying out.

Chuck's picture
Chuck

I do the same thing - invert over my proofing area a plastic container that's deep enough to never contact the dough.


But I got my container real cheap: The night before garbage and recycling pickup, I wandered around the neightborhood until I found a discarded big plastic drawer (it was probably meant for under-bed storage). The original owner apparently discarded it because of a couple discolored spots or maybe a slight warp. I took it home and washed it and have been using it with great success ever since.


(Some folks around here have taken to calling this practice "freecycling". Just be fastidious so the garbage man will still pick everything up, and keep it quiet so nobody thinks they should call the police.)

alabubba's picture
alabubba
thegrindre's picture
thegrindre

Couldn't, for the life of me, figure out how to cover wet dough. I haven't used plastic wrap in many years. All my bowls and pans have their own lids, now.


But, using a bigger container like a plastic tub is a Bingo. A second bread pan inverted is another good idea.


 


Many thanks,


Rick

alabubba's picture
alabubba

Large trash bags work the trick for me. I put the pan/tray into the bag, then twist it closed capturing as much air in the bag as possible. Its sort of like putting it in a balloon. If your worried about drying out, give a spritz of water into the bag before closing.

thegrindre's picture
thegrindre

A balloon type bag thingy is another great idea.


I put a small pan of boiling water right next to the loaf pan then crossed my fingers. My dough doubled in bulk within 12 minutes. I've never seen dough raise that fast before but, that's a whole 'nother story.


Oh, BTW, I do all my raises in my oven with the light on. The light heats up the oven to exactly 100 degrees. I get much shorter raises then the recipe calls for this way.


 


Thanks again,


Rick

Franchiello's picture
Franchiello

Always works for me - I know it's not a popular thing with many of TFL bakers, and not very eco-friendly, but sometimes you just gotta go with what works the best.

AW's picture
AW

Oil the bowl in which the dough is placed, mist the top of the dough with oil, and cover it with the shower cap (cheap ones you get in the hotel; the ones you can buy smell like vinyl...yuck).

alabubba's picture
alabubba

The "Dollar Stores" in my area all sell Bowl Covers. These are like cheapo shower caps except they come in different sizes. I get a box of 15 for a dollar.

belfiore's picture
belfiore

These things are the absolute best! Just use a larger cantainer the dough won't out rise, lay the wet towel across the top rim & snap one of the shower caps, uh, I mean bowl covers (☺) over the top & it'll hold the towel suspended above the dough...still creates humidity but doesn't get stuck.


I also use them on the jars I have my starters in & very seldom use plastic wrap any more.


Toni

AW's picture
AW

I no longer travel for work so am tapped out on my favorite shower caps. :)

CanuckJim's picture
CanuckJim

Over the years, I've found this method works best for me.  The optimal rise temp is 75 degrees F; otherwise the finished breads might taste yeasty.  Lower temps mean longer rise times, but so what.  As said in other threads, I mist the top of the oil, cover in a large bowl and let rise slowly.  I always use plastic wrap, not cloth, and make sure the bowl is large enough to make sure the dough does not touch the surface of the plastic wrap.  This is the basic procedure; there are others for different breads--depends.


Hope that's of some help.


CJ

thegrindre's picture
thegrindre

But, It's in the pan and on its last raise not in the bowl. I use a wet warm towel while in the bowl.


 


Thanks again,


Rick

alabubba's picture
alabubba

I have 2 that are dedicated proofing bags. They really do work. I proofed 4 rounds of pizza dough on a baking sheet using them yesterday.

mimifix's picture
mimifix

Greetings!


Sorry to tell everyone, but some brands of garbage bags are treated with pesticide; trash bag manufacturers do not label their "ingredients" because they are not intended to be used with food.


I use twenty-four inch cling film for covering food, and half-sheet poly bags, both purchased through a bakery supplier. Also, many wholesale packaging suppliers categorize their products and have a food-grade category. That might be a way to go.


Mimi

alabubba's picture
alabubba

Very good point. They put all kinds of stuff in garbage bags. Pesticides, anti-fungal/anti-microbial compounds, as well as perfumes. Make sure you know what your getting. Your local restaurant supply store is your friend.


Allan