The Fresh Loaf

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Sfogliatelle or Canolli; The Ultimate Italian Pastry

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turosdolci's picture
turosdolci

Sfogliatelle or Canolli; The Ultimate Italian Pastry

I said that I would post this recipe. They are delicious but although the pastry is satisfactory it isn't as fine as machine made. I would love to hear from anyone who attempts to make it. 


http://turosdolci.wordpress.com/2010/08/05/sfogliatelle-or-canolli-the-ultimate-italian-pastry/


 



 


 


 


 


 

Comments

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Beautiful flakey layers, looks like the chefs use a sheeter for these fancy pastries!


Sylvia

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci

Hi Sylvia,


I have seen the machine they use and it is pretty amazing. It spins the layers around, not at all the same as when you make them by hand. I handmade the ones you see at the bottom of the post, but the ones at the beginning were bought in Como. I just came back from a store in Aventura, Florida where I have bought them in the past and yes I bought one, ate it in the car couldn't wait. I thought they made them inhouse and wanted to take a picture of the machine.  But they also buy them and just bake them onsite.


Regards,


Patricia

Lillibread's picture
Lillibread

About a year ago I began baking french bread - I've primarily been using Ciril Hitz recipie from "Baking Artisan Bread".  I'm not getting the air pockets that I'd like in the crumb structure.  I'm wondering if someone might have advice for me.  The recipe calls for a poolish - I've been careful re: time/temperature in that regard.  Same w/ the dough.  I've got a Kitchen Aid mixure - I've try to be uber concious about not over working the bread in the mixing process.  Most of the time I use fleischmann's yeast.  I've stayed w/ the recipe is well re: amount of salt.  I've as well been careful not to de-gas the bread as I'm shaping the loaves.  On a couple of ocassions I've even over-proofed the dough just to see if that might make a difference.  It hasn't.  Anybody got any idea on how to get some air (hot air or otherwise) into this bread.  Appreciate your help.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

for posting the recipe, Patricia! I keep thinking of this wonderful pastry and having a (so far unused) pasta machine, I think this might be the first time I'll use it.


Karin

DeeElle's picture
DeeElle

Oh, these are pretty!  They look wonderful to me.  I'm encouraged to see them, and think it's possible to attempt these at home.

belfiore's picture
belfiore

I'm wondering about using the premade pastry sheets used to make baklava...think it'll work?

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci

No Phyllo dough does't work. The dough for this pastry is very different and in fact none of the pastries suggested like puff pastry of pasta frolla are not good for this pastry.  I really think if you want to make them, try the real thing at least once so that you get the idea. You will see that the ingredients for the dough is also completely different.  You can make the pastry and fold them over like a closed clam shell instead of pushing them into a pocket. They don't look the same but at least all the ingredients are the same. Sometimes it is better just to buy them. Most bakeries don't make them inhouse either, they buy them frozen and bake them inhouse.

Doughboy20's picture
Doughboy20

Phyllo dough and premade Puff Pastery dont work.  I have seen recipes saying you can do this but I never see pictures of the final result, just some stock picture they snagged from some other site.  The reason those wont work is mainly because the dough has to be very stretchy like a good pizza dough, but thin nilke Phyllo which tears just by picking it up. 

Sfogliatelle dough seems to sit right in the middle of those, but not either.  Its probably closer to a traditinal German Strudel dough whish is streched across a table before by hand.  There is also a Maltese pastry called Pastizzi wich is very close to the Sfogliatelle except for the last forming step which has a different look but lots of leaves.  It's more of a rough pod shape.

tangobip's picture
tangobip

Don't use filo, it does not work, we tried to do the sfogliatelle using puff pastiy and onother ones but the pasty is very particular. In the end we finish buying them from Roma or directly from Restaurant depot.  It is very time consuming, we are a bakery so  paying a pastry cheff to make sfogliatelle was not a good deal.


If you are going to make them at home you have enough time to try but not for commercial selling.


 


Cristina


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