The Fresh Loaf

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Greek Bread with Liquid Levain and Goats Milk

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SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Greek Bread with Liquid Levain and Goats Milk

This is my version of the recipe from HERE 'Im having trouble getting this to go directly to the recipe, in search type Crusty Greek Country Bread'. I have never made a bread containing goats milk, I thought this a good choice instead of the water called for in the recipe, and I have to say what a very pleasant surprise.  It turned out just as I hoped it would.  The flavor with levain and goats milk was delicious and I've never tasted anything like it before.  It had a sweet creamy taste from the goats milk and duram flour with the added nutty flavor from the sesame seeds.  The crumb was just as I wanted just open enough, I coated the egg wash on extra heavy and all the way down the sides to hold an extra heavy sprinkling of the sesame seeds.  This bread will be outstanding toasted or for sandwiches, whatever way you choose to enjoy it.


Sponge: set aside to rise for 2 hours.


208 gm liquid levain - 100% hydration


84 gms scalded and cooled goats milk - 


62 gms Bread flour


 


Dough:


671 gms Bread Flour


240 gms Duram Flour - You have your choice of flour combinations - Duram is one of my favorites 


420 gms Scalded Goats Milk - cooled


2 Tbsp. Honey


2 Tbsp. Olive Oil


1 Tbsp. Sea Salt


Adding the sponge, I used mechanical and hands with my KA and a combination of Stretch and folds. 


Glaze: One whole egg with 2 tsp water and wisked till foamy - 1/2 cup sesame seeds -


 two round linen lined baskets were used for proofing and then turned onto parchment paper on paddles and slid onto hot oven stone.


 


Preheat oven and stone 450F convection setting for one hour


Because the loaves were heavily coated with glaze I only spritzed my oven after putting in my loaves....no steaming device was used.


Baked for 45 minutes adjusting my oven temperature from 450 convection off 10mins. reducing down to 425 and 375F.


 


            


                                                    


                                                                               


 


                      Sylvia


 


 


 


  

Comments

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Yum, what a wonderful crust, and crumb there Sylvia. I bet the acidic taste of goats milk makes for a wonderful sourdough like bread.


KHalid

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

The bread actually has a very nice flavor without being acidic and even has a more smooth cream flavor today.  I think to because my liquid levain is fruity and sweet.  My husband does not care for a strong sourdough flavor and I want to keep him happy :)


Sylvia

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

How was the crumb texture and flavor? 


David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I think we both agree this is a very nice recipe for a greek bread.  It has several 5 star recommendations.  I will give it a try with the water...when I don't have goats milk handy and that is very likely to happen.  I definately favor the sourdough version of the recipe. 


I was going to make a greek bread from one of my B.Hensperger books, it used a yeasted starter with whole-wheat and the sponge has goat's milk, wheat bran, whole-wheat, AP and barley grit or couscous.  I pre-fer the AP and duram flour over all combinations with my liquid levain.


The crumb is lovely, more of a cool-moist mouth feel and the flavor is has a definate creamy flavor that I wouldn't call acidic or sour from the goats milk..very nice and just seems IHO to make it a 'Greek' bread.  Greek goats cheese is one of my very favorite cheeses so maybe that's why I pre-fer the use of the goats milk.  If I don't have the Greek flat bread to enjoy with Greek salads or Gyro's this definately fits the bill.  I could just pile some roasted lamb on this bread with all the other Greek side salads..yumm, it must be lunch time : ) 


Sylvia

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Sylvia,


So did you enjoy the flavor and aroma?


I had a starter that was fed with milk once and liked the flavor it imparted. I wonder how this would be if you fed the starter using Duram and goats milk for a couple feedings? A number of us have been chipping away at the mysterious Greek country bread. This seems like a step in the right direction.


 


Eric

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

I have actually fed my starter with milk instead of water when I make pure sourdough version of Asian soft sandwich breads. The liquid in those breads usually is milk or cream, so I simply add a portion of milk/cream and flour to my starter to make a starter dough, let rise for 12 hours before adding to the main dough. Crumb of those bread is very soft creamy, but then I am not sure how much of that is contributed by the milk starter. 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I was so happy with this formula and flavors.  The only thing I can think would improve upon this bread is bake it in my WFO.  This bread is a perfect candidate for easy timing to go into a cooling wfo after a pizza bake.  I don't think I want to change the starter.  If you try that formula please let us know the outcome.


Sylvia

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

ha, Eric, Mike just came in and took his first slice.  I watched him as he took a bite looked at me and actually inhaled, took a bite, chewed and said...this is really good and smiled..that is a definate approval that he enjoyes this breads flavor and aroma.


Sylvia

ehanner's picture
ehanner

That's good to hear he liked it. The goats milk wasn't that hard to find here in the Milwaukee area. Woodmans Market which is a huge supermarket that tries to carry a wide variety of brands stocks it. I have tried many recipes for this bread and honestly the best thing I can say is I have made some good Italian style breads. But, I haven't tried the Duram and goats milk.


Thanks for the post Sylvia. I'll give it a try.


Eric

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

What an interesting formula?! I've never had goat's milk before - except for maybe goat milk cheese, very curious about the flavor.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

My first experience with it too,  and it's such a healthy milk...no wonder the Greeks live so long.  A lot of the goat cheeses can vary, much in flavors.  Do give it a try ASAP.  Great stuff.  We have plenty of goat farms around here...my daughter even has a couple of the pigmy ones for pets...not for milk...they are such loveable little creatures..no wonder their milk is so tasty.


Sylvia 

wally's picture
wally

as always Sylvia!  I like the idea of goats milk, though I'm not sure where I'd get it around here.  Years ago in Nebraska I used to buy fresh goats milk and make yogurt with it - yum!


The crumb looks very light and inviting.


Larry

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

fresh goats milk yogurt, now that's healthy stuff for a young man in Nebraska.  I also had a greek salad yesterday for lunch and tomorrow a sandwich similar to yours..only mine has sardines, feta, onion and cucumber, I grew.  Sardines are great for calcium which I need and the good oils and what I like is they are low in mercury.  I'm so grateful my mother taught me to enjoy sardines at a young age.


Sylvia

tao_of_dough's picture
tao_of_dough

That is absolutely beautiful!  This is probably an inane comment considering all the erudite discussion on the flavor profile and technical aspects of your project, but I really love your photographs of your bread.  Very nice composition and lighting. Well done!

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

for the very nice compliment!


Sylvia

Renee B's picture
Renee B

Do you think it would work to use 140g semolina and 140g chick pea flour, or would this be too dense.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

The original recipe says to use 1 kilo/8cups of bread flour and also lists the use of whole wheat, barley, white corn, or other.  I don't see why your combination would not work allowing for any hydration changes.  I can't get the link to work above.  If you would like to view the original recipe just type in 'Greek Crusty County Bread' in your search or go to the About.com site and Greek foods search box and it will bring up the recipe and photo.


Sylvia