The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

What size sieve for white bread?

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julianna479's picture
julianna479

What size sieve for white bread?

Can someone tell me what sieve to buy to create a white bread flour...I want to sift out as much bran as possible...to make a nice white bread flour..I am milling Hard Red Winter Wheat Berries...would a 55 mesh sieve be small enough..or should I get a 100 mesh? I found a 55 mesh on www.fantes.com..

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven
julianna479's picture
julianna479

I need to learn a bit more about mills first....I am borrowing a mill to try it out...so I don't want to ruin it by putting moist grain in it, what I read is only put dry gains....but if I get a mill I will try this....might be too much work!...I may just buy my flour....haha...but thank you for the information!

proth5's picture
proth5

Do not even CONSIDER putting wet/moist grain in ANY mill!!!!!


Tempering is a process of adding very controlled amounts of water to wheat berries to change their moisture content - however when the grain enters the mill it should be dry to the touch.


I use a grain moisture meter when I temper to make sure I have reached the right moisture level, but the grain is dry. While there are methods of determining the moisture level of wheat without a moisture meter, they all take a bit of practice and experience.


My recent research has indicated that if you are stone milling tempering is not needed.


Here is a link to my blog when I milled white flour.  I have also milled high extraction flour (see other blogs).  My opinion is that there is little advantage to home milling white flour except for the joy of knowing you can do it.  I do include seive sizes.


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/10873/white-flour-project


Hope this helps.

julianna479's picture
julianna479

I thought tempering was considered moist grain since it contained moisture?......I decided that I will just buy white flour...too much work to get it cleaned out...I will just mill my four when I want some whole grain breads...and not get into tempering....I did make a loaf last night from my own milled flour (didn't add any white flour)  it came out great!...I used Organic Hard Red Winter....since I am at about 7000ft...I was surprised it didn't come out like a brick.....

proth5's picture
proth5

All grain contains moisture - tempered or not. What that moisture content is will be determined by a number of factors. I generally find it runs abot 9% in the grain that I buy, but it varies.  There is much to discuss about grain moisture prior to tempering.  Others I am sure will chime in.


Tempering is a process of adding additional moisture over a period of time to bring the moisture level in the grain to a specific level.  It also serves to toughen the bran so that it separates more easily - particulaly in the roller milling process.  My recent research tells me that it should be a multi step process with different methods of mixing the water with the grain at different steps.


Some information you may read speaks of "soaking" the grain prior to milling.  This conjures up the mental picture of a tub of water with grain floating around in it.  This is not how it is done.  A very controlled amount of water is added to the grain and the grain in mixed to evenly distribute the water.  It will be moist to the touch right after adding the water, but some hours later the moisture will have been absorbed and the grain will be dry to the touch although its moisture level will have changed.


If you touch properly tempered grain at say 14% moisture, it will feel dry to the touch. "Dry to the touch" is very important. 


In general, home millers don't temper their grain and most of them do not need to.  Tempering is a complex topic and deserves some heavy duty research prior to the home miller atempting it.


And yes, I recommend a moisture meter.  Meters are costly, but so can be mistakes on grain moisture.


In what passes for my "normal" life, I routinely bake with home milled flour at 5280 ft. It works just fine.


I just want to emphasize to the OP that "moist to the touch" grain should not be introduced into any mill.