The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pita Bread

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zainaba22's picture
zainaba22

Pita Bread

I post this recipe before for JMonkey, you can see it here.

 

1 Tablespoon yeast.
1 Tablespoon honey or sugar .
2 1\2 cup warm water.
3 cups white flour.
1 1\2 cups whole wheat flour.
2 teaspoon salt.
2 Tablespoons olive oil.

1)Preheat the oven to 550 degrees.

2)Combine yeast,honey and 1\2 cup water in bowl,cover,stand in warm place about 10 minutes or until mixture is frothy.

3)place all ingredients + yeast mixture in the bowl of mixer ,beat 10 minutes to make a soft dough.

4)Divide dough into 12 pieces.

5)Shape each piece into a ball .cover,let rise in warm place until doubled in size ,about 1 hour.

6)Roll each to a 16 cm round.

7)The old method i bake Pita Bread on hot baking surface for 1 minute per side.

8)The new method I bake pita bread on wire rack over baking pan for 2-3 minutes.you can see it here.

zainab

http://arabicbites.blogspot.com/



 


Comments

Trishinomaha's picture
Trishinomaha

I just got home from work and I would be perfectly content to sit down to the table in your photo and have it be my supper. Lovely Pita - Very nice photos.

Trish

HogieWan's picture
HogieWan

how hot is your oven/baking surface?

zainaba22's picture
zainaba22

  550 F degrees oven .

zainab

http://arabicbites.blogspot.com/

martin's picture
martin

My wife and I learned to eat this in Egypt for breakfast. We add a bit of honey to the cheese.

We are able to buy Syrian/Egyptian Olives and Cheese here in Malaysia. We make the bread.

 

Martin Prior

www.bakerette-cafe.com

ejm's picture
ejm

Beautiful! I love how thin they are. (Thanks for the reminder that it's time to make falafel again...)

-Elizabeth 

shater991's picture
shater991

this is amazing , i have one question


iam using a pizza stone , in which rack i should place it when preheating ?


please advice and thank you for this great recipe .

ejm's picture
ejm

We put our stone on the middle shelf of the oven. But when we make pita in the barbecue, we don't use a stone at all and put the bread directly on the rack. You could probably do the same in the oven.


-Elizabeth

shater991's picture
shater991

Thank u Elizabeth , iam gonna try it the next time i make pita


one more thing , when i bake them they wont be that thin , i mean when i bake them they wont be as the picture .. like a bubble .. i dont know although iam following the recipe , thats why iam afried maybe it is where iam supposed to place my rack on .


 

ejm's picture
ejm

If they aren't as thin, you'll just have to bake them longer to make sure they're done inside.


edit: Why don't you think they will bubble? You may be surprised... we made naan in the barbecue last night and couldn't believe how much they puffed.


-Elizabeth

BellesAZ's picture
BellesAZ

Rolling the dough very thin makes your pita's puff when baked.  In any given recipe, I'll have 75% of mine puff, the others don't.. either puffed or not, they are still good.  If yours aren't puffing, you've not rolled them out thin enough.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

We always put the stone on the bottom rung or one step up. I think the bottom rack is the hottest place in an electric oven.


--Pamela

ejm's picture
ejm

This is exactly why we put our stone on the middle shelf of our electric oven. We were having problems with bread burning on the bottom before it was done on top.


The stone placement probably varies from oven to oven.


-Elizabeth


P.S. When I bake anything that has a lot of sugar in it (cookies, cinnamon buns, challah) I place the tray on the TOP shelf of our oven - which goes against anything I've ever read in a cookbook.

RubyPanther's picture
RubyPanther

I don't know about those books, my mom taught me the same way... cookies and sweets on the top rack. (Bread in the middle)

hansent's picture
hansent

Thanks so much Zainaba!  They were easy to make once I figured out how to get them onto my stone.  My finiky 14 y/o daughter as been eating them quite quickly. Yeah! Next time I am going to try to use my lefsa grill (Gets up to 500 degrees) with the lid on to make these.


What is the best way to flip them without puncturing them?


Thanks,


Tania in boise

ejm's picture
ejm

We use tongs to turn our pitas. That usually works and doesn't pierce them.


-Elizabeth

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

These look great. Have you ever made mini pitas? They are about 4 inches across. I was wondering how long to bake them.

zainaba22's picture
zainaba22

Thank you all for your comments here,& sorry I didn't answer your questions.(Thanks Elizabeth for answering them).

flourgirl51,
I didn't made mini pitas before ,but I think they don't take much time ,when they puffed you know they done.


zainab


Arabic Bites

BellesAZ's picture
BellesAZ

Your balls of dough are quite pretty.  Perfectly shaped and just beautiful.  Nice photo's, thanks for sharing

maiko_rocha's picture
maiko_rocha

Hi, I tried your recipe but the dough turned out way too soft. Ot was impossible to shape them into balls without adding more flour. In the recipe it says 2 1/2 cups of water, so I used 1/2 cup to start the yeast as described plus 2 cups when adding everything in the mixer. Am I doing something wrong?

ejm's picture
ejm

I wonder if it's possible that in the likely very dry climate of Saudia Arabia, more water needs to be added to the flour to make the dough.


I use considerably less water in our pita dough: 1 cup (250ml) of water for 2.5 cups flour  (so if I increased my recipe to 4.5 cups flour, I'd use 1.8 cups of water) I also use less yeast: 1 tsp (which would work out to 1.8tsp yeast, a third less - at least I think I'm doing the arithmetic correctly.)


I have noticed that in summer when it's very humid,  our pita dough is much much slacker than it is in the winter.


-Elizabeth


Here is the pita recipe I use to make 8 pitas.

BellesAZ's picture
BellesAZ

I think you're onto something Elizabeth.  I used to live in Oregon and now Arizona.. I've had to adjust my entire way of thinking when it comes to dough hydration. 


I posed this question to Peter Reinhart and he said to me, "Your dough never lies" and I've followed that advice always and it has never failed me.

wwiiggggiinnss's picture
wwiiggggiinnss (not verified)

I tried this recipe too before reading the comments.


The recipe quantities are not correct. It has far too much water, too little flour.


The quantities result in a wet, sloshy goop.


I tried upping it to 4 cups white, 2 cups whole wheat and it's still goop.


I corrected it as best I could, but I doubt it'll come out.

zainaba22's picture
zainaba22

 


 maiko_rocha & wwiiggggiinnss,


my whole wheat flour is very heavy so I use a lot of water.


if the amount of water in my recipe don't work with you try to reduce the water to 2 cup & use 2 cups of whole wheat flour.


also try to add the water gradually until you have soft dough.


I think this will work ..


 


 

oceanicthai's picture
oceanicthai

Looks delicious

melinda-dawn's picture
melinda-dawn

and I'll have time to try this recipe, they look so yummy

Eli31's picture
Eli31

i saw this and made a batch immediately the next day. They're rising now. Pity i can't make banana bread now.

Mum limits me to teo things a week...:( (I'm 11) Mmmm, can't wait to try ithe pits when they're ready...:)