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Osmotolerant yeast question

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Osmotolerant yeast question

I made a highly enriched dough today, and I thought about opening my new package of osmotolerant yeast (SAF Gold) but used regular instant yeast, as prescribed in the recipe. Even though the kitchen was quite warm, the dough rose very slowly. I know osmotolerant yeast is supposed to speed up fermentation in doughs with high sugar content and low water (hydration from eggs, milk, butter, etc.) 


My question is: Do you adjust the yeast quantity in a recipe that calls for instant yeast when you use osmotolerant yeast?


David

Franko's picture
Franko

David, here's a link to a site that must have the answer to your query. I started to read through it but I'm bushed, so have a go at it and let us know what you find. Franko


 


http://www.theartisan.net/The_Artisan_Yeast_Treatise_Section_One.htm#Yeast%20Conversion

LindyD's picture
LindyD


Do you adjust the yeast quantity in a recipe that calls for instant yeast when you use osmotolerant yeast?



Hi David, 


I checked Dan DiMuzio's book (pages 23 and 158), as well as Glezer's A Blessing of Bread (page 35) and yes, you do need to adjust since the amount of instant yeast is doubled (or more) in highly sweetened breads.


Glezer advises to use a normal amount of osmotolerant yeast for very sweet, dry dough.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

By time I wrote the message last night, I was too pooped to do much of my own research. (Excuse: Set up dough for 4 kinds of bread and revived a starter that had been neglected - probably for 6 months. Another story.)


That's just the information I wanted!


David

davidg618's picture
davidg618

:7 Sisters?


I especially bought osmotolerant yeast recently to use in very sweet doughs (> 12% sugar), my next exploration into bread baking. This dough certainly qualifies.


I'm going to use the guidlines in DiMuzio's book (page 158) aiming for a bulk fermentation time of 1 hour, assuming osmotolerent yeast will behave similar to instant dry yeast in lean doughs. That equates to 1%, a radical difference.


If it doesn't work, I'll revert to the directed amount of IDY.


I'll keep you informed; I'm baking tomorrow (Sunday).


David G

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I had to ferment the dough for about 90 minutes at about 78ºF to get a 50% expansion. I'll be waiting to hear how you do with the osmotolerant yeast.


David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

My 'gold' yeast..I love this yeast and have been using it for about a year.  I reduce it by about 1/2 teaspoon from what the recipe calls for...I've had very good results. Pandora, cinnamon rolls and the Gibassier by Ciril Hitz Baking Artisan Pastries & Breads, his recipe calls for osmotolerant yeast.


Sylvia

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

In hindsight, I should have cracked my SAF Gold package, but, for recipe testing, I think I provided useful data.


David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

is always helpful...CH Gibassier, he says to use instant yeast preferably osmotolerant and the Baker's % is 2.5% but he doesn't mention to reduce the amount if using the OIGY. 


Sylvia

davidg618's picture
davidg618

David,


As I said above, I baked Seven Sisters with 7g (1%) of SAF Gold osmotolerent yeast. I've already told you, via message, the brief time to bulk ferment, but at elevated dough temperature. 


Final proof time, for both bakings was 45 mins. which I think is within the expected time range, normal for this yeast. 


Overall, I found this a good test of osmotolerent yeast, and I'm pleased with the results. I will continue to use it in high sugar content doughs.


A picture of my results is posted on NYB test thread.


Specific to your question: use normal amounts (percentages) of osmotolerent yeast in sweet doughs.


David G.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I see Eric's experiment as still inconclusive. I wonder what SAF recommends. Maybe a call to KAF would be informative.


David

davidg618's picture
davidg618

You will be interested in my lastest post on Eric's "smackdown".


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/9629/great-saf-red-vs-gold-smackdown#comment-123491


David G

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I saw your post on Eric's "smackdown" topic. 


I sent an e-mail to KAF with my question. It was too late there to expect a response before tomorrow.


Reading postings on their "Bakers' Banter" board, there are many endorsements of KAF Gold speeding fermentation for enriched doughs. Not so much for sourdoughs. No discussion of changing the amount of yeast - some one did ask the question (in 2003), but there was no answer.


If I have no response tomorrow and have the time, I may give them a phone call. I've always found their tech support outstanding over the phone.


David

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

FYI, here's the response I received today to my query to KAF:



As you mentioned, gold yeast is used in doughs that are made with richer, sweeter ingredients like sweet breads. A baking friend of mine was complaining recently about her cinnamon bun dough taking so long to rise. When she tried the process with gold yeast she was amazed at the improved time and improved baked product.


Your instincts are correct in that you use the same amount of yeast as


the recipe calls for.


I hope these tips are helpful in your quest.


Happy Baking!


Irene


King Arthur Flour



David