The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

New Haven Style Italian Breads and Pastries

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cliffgarz's picture
cliffgarz

New Haven Style Italian Breads and Pastries

I grew up in New Haven and there were two bakeries Apicella's and Venice bakery both made this great Italian bread and I am looking for a recipe so I can recreate it in the south as everything here is mush.   Also in New Have the old Verabs bakery used to make poppyseed horns needing a recipe for those as well as friselles


 


thanks


 


PS I just finished my brick oven to make New haven style pizza

rockfish42's picture
rockfish42

Could you give a bit more of a description?

cliffgarz's picture
cliffgarz

Poppyseed Horn


Sweet yellow center hard to remember the texture but this is the closest image i could come up with, as far as the italian breads they are like grinder breads about 16 - 18 inches long tapered on each end and fatter in the middle.  Only New Haven people know what it is.  Rocco's Bakery on Ferry Street is now what used to be Verabs and they still carry the horns. Sorry i can't be more descriptive but it's been a long time since I've had or seen any of  it.

breadman1015's picture
breadman1015

I'm in Fairfield County and the Italian Bread we get is similar to New York's "Arthur Street" Italian Bread. I believe the "New Haven" Italian Bread replaces the AP Flour with Semolina Flour. If you replace the AP Flour in the recipe below, you should get close to what you seek.


 


                                           Connecticut Italian Bread
                                                 (about 2 lbs.)
                                                                                            Bakers %
Biga:    5-1/2     oz.     High Gluten Flour                                     30
            5-1/4     oz.     AP Flour                                                  30
            6-3/4     oz.     Water                                                      35
             1          Tbs.    Yeast


Dough:   6          oz.      High Gluten Flour                                    30
              2          oz.      AP Flour                                                  10
              4-5/8    oz.      Water                                                     24
              3/8       oz.      Sugar                                                       2
              1          tsp.     Salt                                                          2
              1          Tbs.    Non-Diastatic Malt                                      1
              3/8        oz.     Shortening                                                2  
                                                                                                  166


Make the Biga: In the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle, combine all of the ingredients. Mix at low speed until a soft dough is formed. Install the dough hook and knead at medium speed for 3-4 minutes. Cover and allow to ferment for 4-6 hours. Punch-down; cover; and refrigerate overnight.


Make the Dough: Remove Biga from the refrigerator and allow to come to room temperature, about 30 minutes. Add the Dough ingredients to the bowl. Install the paddle and mix at low speed until dough begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl. Install the dough hook and knead at medium speed to form a smooth, elastic dough, about 10-12 minutes. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper or Silpat. Form the dough into torpedo rolls (3-1/2 oz.) or loaves (1 lb.). Cover and proof until almost tripled in size.



Preheat the oven to 450°F. Slash rolls with 1 cut and loaves with 3 cuts. Bake with heavy steam for 5 minutes. reduce temperature to 400°F and bake until fully browned, about 15 minutes for rolls or 25 minutes for loaves. Cool completely before cutting.

cliffgarz's picture
cliffgarz

I'll give it a try this weekend and let you know how it works out


 


Cliff


 

fenderaxe's picture
fenderaxe

Wow do I love those New Haven poppyseed horns.  I lived in New Haven for 9 years and for a couple of those years in Fairhaven.  I think Rocco's made the one's I was used to buying.  I visited New Haven in 2005 and got some from Rocco's on Ferry street.  I can't find a picture of them either, but they were a rich yellow color, and weren't quite as horn shaped as the pics shown.  And they were big, also.  And some would have a light frosting of glaze on top.  If only I could find them in Central New York.  Utica and Syracuse have large Italian populations but no one up here ever heard of them.  Also up here, Italian sausage and peppers is not cooked in pasta sauce!!  That is my other New Haven food that I miss the most.  The sausage and peppers simmered in Italian sauce that was everywhere in New Haven.   And here they don't know that either!  Life is strange...