The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Wasa-style cracker

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SulaBlue's picture
SulaBlue

Wasa-style cracker

I'm guessing this is the best place to put this.


 


I'd like to make a whole-grain, high-fiber Wasa-style cracker. For those of you who haven't had Wasa, they're flatbread/crackers about the size of a graham cracker. They have been docked with large holes as one would do to a thin pizza crust. They are VERY dry, but very crisp. Some varieties (Multigrain and the 'hearty' varieties in particular) are about 1/4" inch thick and very airy.


 


Anyone got any clues on how to go about this? A very low-hydration dough rolled out flat, allowed to rise and then baked?


 


(Hopefully this thing will let me post now. I gave up awhile back due to not being able to post)

smasty's picture
smasty

I regularly make a recipe from KAF called "Crunchy Crackers"....if you search on their website it will come up.  It's a very lean cracker that you could make to be very much like Wasa.  You can get very creative with flavorings too.  I add a can of hot Rotel tomatoes to my cracker dough instead of water and make them really spicy. 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi,


I think laminating some fat into the dough gives you a biscuit which is crispy and airy.   They need plenty of rest to allow the gluten to relax.   Commercially the gluten may be softened by using Sodium Metabisulphite, or, L-Cysteine to break the cross bonds in the protein structure.


You can bake hot to gain plenty of aeration from the laminated dough.   These are really popular with cheese in the UK.   They sound similar in concept to our "Water Biscuits", and "Cream Crackers".   Yes, they would be docked


Easy, and a lot of fun to make


Best wishes


Andy

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

For Wasa-style crisp bread sourdough recipe, click here! The recipe is given in Swedish, but hopefully Google can give a sensible translation. By the way, Google didn't recognise the Swedish "rågsurdegsgrund", which is "rye starter" ;)


PS: Oven temperature (200 degrees) is Celsius.

SulaBlue's picture
SulaBlue

Thanks for the leads. I'll give these a go. I should have went to KAF first, of course!