The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

how to use whey in bread baking

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futurebakery's picture
futurebakery

how to use whey in bread baking

Hello,


I am working in a cheese making company. This company is making cottage cheese and as a result we have lots of whey as a by-product of cheese. Since there is a bakery factory right beside our dairy facility, we were thinking to use the whey in making our bread!!


We tried once but the loaf did not show good volume. Any body knows what could be the reason? Is there any specific method of dough preparation recommended??

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

in place of all the expected water and I never noticed any difference in volume.


Its acidity should also preserve the bread for a longer period of time.

futurebakery's picture
futurebakery

thanks for your response. But, how about the mixing time? is it going to be less when we use whey? there is more Pr in the formula now, so I believe more mixing would break the glouten network??

Crider's picture
Crider

I only hand mix, but you'll need to increase your hydration due to the milk solids in the whey. For hand mixing, I think whey in the dough makes it handle better. Translate that into machine mixing, and I suspect you need less time for gluten development.

Crider's picture
Crider

I use sourdough yeast, though. Maybe it is more tolerant of the acidity. The flavor can't be beat and the crust gets a nice browning boost.

qahtan's picture
qahtan

I have never heard or seen any thing about it, are you meaning starter????qahtan

Crider's picture
Crider

sourdough or wild yeast = starter.

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

The composition of  the remaining liquid whey depends on the type of cheese made. Do you have a good understanding of the composition of the whey being produced? When substituting whey for liquid in the bread formula, were the other components in the whey also taken into account, and the formula adjusted accordingly?   


 


I wonder in particular what the salt content of the whey is...? Excess salt will interfere with the yeast's activity.  Generally in bread, salt is used around 1.8 - 2% baker's percent. Adjustment would be needed to keep the baker's percent of salt in the overall bread formula/e the same as used to date. 


 


Is there a university in your area with a food technology dept and/or dairy research department. Or maybe the suppliers of your other bread ingredients have a research department.  They may be able to provide guidance in altering your bread formulae to successfully incorporate whey. I am certain you will come up with good bread and may even be able to use this as a point of difference for marketing purposes.