The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

WHEAT MONTANA's Prairie Gold

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Cliff Johnston's picture
Cliff Johnston

WHEAT MONTANA's Prairie Gold

Try as I may I wasn't able to locate a local source of hard, spring, golden wheat at a reasonable price.  The freight cost made ordering direct prohibitive.  So, I had my nearby health-food-store-pill-pusher try to find any hard, spring wheat for me.  I'll give them credit.  They will try to find whatever I ask of them.  Imagine my surprise when I picked up the wheat today and found that they had obtained a GOLDEN, hard, spring wheat for me - Prairie Gold as grown and sold by Wheat Montana.  Here's their web site:  http://wheatmontana.com/    I don't know how it compares to Walton's Golden 86, but Wheat Montana's Prairie Gold sounds just as good if not better.

I'll be milling some tonight and letting it age for at least 3 days before I bake some bread with it.  I took some Prairie Gold and put it beside the hard, white, winter wheat that I've been using.  The Prairie Gold has a slightly "brighter" look to it.  I can hardly wait to use it. I'll keep you all posted.  Has anyone else out there used any Prairie Gold wheat?

Cliff.

Susan's picture
Susan

Strange coincidence, Cliff; on Monday I will be picking up 50 lbs of Prairie Gold and 50 lbs of Natural White. Flour, tho, not berries. I'm really looking forward to trying these flours, as I have heard only good things. Can't wait to hear what you have to say!

Susan

SourdoLady's picture
SourdoLady

I predict that you guys are going to love it! I live in Montana and not far from where it is grown. I have been using their Prairie Gold and AP White for several years. The AP is really equal to a bread flour and not like the grocery store AP flours. I always put about 1/2 cup of the Prarie Gold in all my white breads and you can't even tell it is there by the appearance. It adds more flavor, though. It is a lighter colored wheat and milder in flavor than hard red wheat.

bwraith's picture
bwraith

I was in Montana recently on a ski trip. I baked some breads while there, which had some people questioning my sanity. I bought some Wheat Montana flours, and they worked very well. I may well order them for here in NJ, even though KA is in the stores here.

Cliff Johnston's picture
Cliff Johnston

I received an email today in reply to my inquiry about the gluten and protein levels in Wheat Montana's Prairie Gold grain.  I was caught very much by surprise!  The gluten and protein both come in at 15%.

Cliff. Johnston
"May the best you've ever seen,
 Be the worst you'll ever see;"
from A Scots Toast by Allan Ramsay

Susan's picture
Susan

Thanks for the info, Cliff. Good to know. Yesterday I picked up the Montana high gluten flour and what turned out to be Prairie Gold berries instead of flour. I was so excited that I didn't notice until I got home. hehehe. Anyway, just as well, since I am bad and use much more white flour than ww; the PG ww will last a lot longer as berries. My right arm will slowly start to look like Popeye's as I hand-grind enough for a couple of loaves. Maybe that's the secret to being able to eat all this great bread: Hand-grind the wheat!

Let us see lots more pictures now, y'hear!

Susan

Cliff Johnston's picture
Cliff Johnston

Susan,

You're welcome.  I was surprised at the high values.

I'll start a loaf on Thursday and document it with a set of photos.  The flour will have aged a few days by then.  I've got to see a specialist about my hand Thursday, but I should be able to work around him.  The bread will be baked Friday about noon.  I'll slice into it about 1 PM.

Cliff. Johnston
"May the best you've ever seen,
 Be the worst you'll ever see;"
from A Scots Toast by Allan Ramsay

Cliff Johnston's picture
Cliff Johnston

I finally got a loaf of whole wheat bread made using just the Prairie Gold flour that I milled at home.  There are two words that come to mind to describe it:  "Superbly Delicious".  It is without a doubt the best tasting whole wheat bread that I have ever eaten.  Self praise is no honor, but here the praise all goes to the Prairie Gold grain that I used.  I've got a batch of rye dough working now.  Tomorrow I'll be able to do a direct comparison between the rye bread with Prairie Gold flour and rye bread with hard winter wheat flour.

For those of you with eagle eyes, the yellow streak in the bread is corn meal.  I had some logistical problems making this bread.  Visually it was not the most perfect loaf of bread;  however, the flavor was exceptional.

As luck would have it just as I was finishing eating the first slice of this bread there was a knock at the door.  It was a lady who owns a restaurant.  She had heard that I milled my own flour.  I invited her in and let her sample the fresh whole wheat bread and some of my rye bread too.  I have never enjoyed watching someone's face as they enjoy bread as I did this afternoon.  She started talking about buying it for her restaurant...I don't think that she can afford it, just between you and I...it's not an inexpensive bread to make.

I strongly recommend Prairie Gold by Wheat Montana.  It is a superior grain for milling flour for bread.  They also sell the flour.  It's a win/win situation.

Cliff. Johnston
"May the best you've ever seen,
 Be the worst you'll ever see;"
from A Scots Toast by Allan Ramsay

jvmooresc's picture
jvmooresc

Hi, Cliff

I'm new to this group, but have been using Wheat Montana Prairie Gold for many years.  Fortunately I can get 50 lb sacks of berries from a local bakery here in SC (I live in Charleston).  I've found it to produce the MOST delicious, nutty-flavored breads with an exceptionally high protein content.  I used to use Walton's G86, but can't find it here in SC.  

Your photo looks edible!

Judith

Cliff Johnston's picture
Cliff Johnston

Welcome aboard.  I'm a rank amateur, but I thoroughly enjoy eating my work!

Can you give us a comparison between the Prairie Gold from Wheat Montana and  Walton's Golden 86?

Cliff. Johnston
"May the best you've ever seen,
 Be the worst you'll ever see;"
from A Scots Toast by Allan Ramsay

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

On Walton's site they tell an interesting story about the origin of the seed for their Golden 86 and say it's the same as the source of seed for Montana's Prairie Gold and that only the names are different.                                                                                   weavershouse

Cliff Johnston's picture
Cliff Johnston

I wasn't aware of that.  Thanks for the feedback.  There might be some minor differences in density due to the higher altitude that Golden Prairie is grown at.  Do you know the protein content of Walton's Golden 86?  Prairie Gold is at 15% - same for their gluten content.

Cliff. Johnston
"May the best you've ever seen,
 Be the worst you'll ever see;"
from A Scots Toast by Allan Ramsay

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Walton says it buys all their Golden 86 from one farmer in Montana and the only other grower of this white wheat is a nearby farmer just North of him...Wheat Montana's Prairie Gold. Could the protein content be much different, I don't know. I just bought some Golden 86 and can't wait to grind it and use it.                               weavershouse

Cliff Johnston's picture
Cliff Johnston

6 of one and 1/2 a dozen of the other.  Yes I would think from that information that they are probably one and the same.  Thanks, that's good information to have.  After all there are only the 3 colors, red, white & golden with the golden being the most recent and therefore the least planted.

Cliff. Johnston
"May the best you've ever seen,
 Be the worst you'll ever see;"
from A Scots Toast by Allan Ramsay