The Fresh Loaf

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4/30/10 - Malted Tourte de Meule

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breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

4/30/10 - Malted Tourte de Meule

Hey All,


Just wanted to share with you a potentially successful bake.  This is my variation of Eric Kayser’s Tourte de Meule.  I was inspired by Don D’s bake here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/14445/eric-kayser039s-la-tourte-de-meule


I will post a crumb shot tomorrow.




Ingredients


300g WW


130g AP


50g Malted Barley Flour


350g Water


12g Kosher Salt


1/8 tsp ADY


962g Total Dough Yield


Directions:


9:00am – Mix all ingredients in large mixing bowl, autolyse covered for 30 minutes.


9:30am – Knead 3 minutes in bowl with wet hands.  Do not add any extra flour.  Rest 30 mins.


10:00am – Knead 1 minute, rest for 1 hr.


11:00am – Turn dough, rest 1 hr.


12:00pm – Shape dough into boule, place in floured linen lined banneton/basket, proof for 2 hrs.


1:00pm – Arrange baking stone and steam pan in oven.  Preheat 550F.


2:00pm – Turn dough out onto lightly floured peel, slash as desired, place in oven directly on stone, pour 1 1/2 cups water into steam tray.  Bake 15 mins at 450F.  Rotate, bake for another 40 minutes at 425F.  Loaf is done when internal temp reaches 210F.  Cool completely before cutting.



 

Comments

Mebake's picture
Mebake

YUM! i love how you always aim for a brownish crust. Contributions always anticipated!


khalid

ananda's picture
ananda

Looks a very fine loaf indeed; bet the crumb shot will be equally impressive!


Andy

ehanner's picture
ehanner

How could this not be a perfect loaf? It looks nice and light, fully expanded with your creative scoring pattern. Very nice.


Eric

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Your loaf has quite an elegance about it.  "Pleasingly graceful and stylish in appearance or manner."  


Yep, that sums it up alright.


Mini

wally's picture
wally

Your loaf calls to mind Shiao-Ping's artistry.  Can't wait to see the crumb shots!


Larry

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Well, I had hoped for a a nice crumb.  I am rather disappointed as the crumb was actually wet and soggy...  I think I am adding too much malted barley flour, however I have seen recipes in Dan Lepard's "The Art of the Handmade Loaf" that use about 20% malted barley flour...  Anyways here are the crumbshots...  The pics are very decieving...



Mebake's picture
Mebake

Never, i wouldn't call it deceiving. Judging from the looks of the crumb, i'd say: Toast it and top it with all sorts of goodies, even yogurt.


Wonderful Bread there!

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi


It's quite a crust you have on this loaf, achieved with a generous bake profile.   Your probe thermometer would read nearly 99*C, and that should easily be proof the bread is fully baked.


I don't think that trying to use barley flour @ 10% should be any sort of problem.   However from your second photo above, I surmise the crumb structure is somewhat weak.   This seems strange, as your loaf is wonderfully bold.   These are just ideas for you to think through, as I know you are an experienced baker: Was your dough fully-developed?   Is it a little over-hydrated [73%]?   Do you need a stronger white flour to make up for the barley flour being so deficient of gluten?


These are just ideas to think through, I don't think they necessarily give you a full answer.   A weaker and wet crumb really does look like an amylase issue, most likely from the barley flour, as you suggest.   I agree this is the most likely cause.   Have you checked on the enzymic activity of the barley flour?


Best wishes


Andy


 

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

I suspect the failure of this loaf has to do with the barley flour that I am using.  I did use AP instead of bread flour, so that may have contributed.  How do I test the amylase activity of the barley flour?

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi


Millers use Hagburg falling no. to test for amylase; obviously not available to you.


Is there any information on the packet?   Is there any reference to "diastatic" or "non-diastatic"?   Any mention of "enzyme active", or, not?


Tim, I'm just trying to relate this issue to what I know about amylase content in wheatflour, and how it is controlled by millers, and how we as homebakers can use malt flour  to influence amylase activity.


It's quite hard for me to advise further than that, unless you can find some means of getting the flour tested!?


Best wishes


Andy

DonD's picture
DonD

Very handsome and creative scoring as well. I see you got very nice oven spring considering that you did not use any pre-ferment and the low amount of yeast. I have never used malted barley flour in that quantity in a bake so I have no frame of reference as to its effect on taste and dough structure. From what I read, it is used in small quantity to stimulate yeast action and give the bread a sweeter taste. Most commercial AP and Bread Flours already have some malted barley flour added.


Don