The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

? about P. Reinhart's San Fran sourdough recipe

  • Pin It
medora66's picture
medora66

? about P. Reinhart's San Fran sourdough recipe

Hi all,


I'm a newbie who has been making Peter Reinhart's basic San Fran sourdough recipe for a few weeks.  I am REALLY pleased with it, and impressed that I can make such a tasty loaf.  But I have two questions about it ...


1) Can I make the starter dough (allowing it to sit for 6-8 hours) ... and then immediately make the dough?  So that I would actually make the bread over TWO days instead of THREE?  (I've been allowing the starter to sit overnight, which is nice if I have the time to plan ahead that far, but I don't always).  It's not clear to me whether not allowing the starter dough to sit overnight improves the tang of the sourdough enough to make a point of it.  


(I'm asking because I would very much like to shorten this to a TWO DAY process ... making starter dough, letting it sit, making the ACTUAL dough, popping it in the fridge overnight, then making the bread the next morning).


 


2) Whenever I make the loaf -- either a round boule or an oval loaf proofed in a banneton -- it ends up being somewhat triangular when baked.  In other words, the middle score REALLY opens up, and the bread takes on this pyramid look.  It doesn't seem to affect the flavor (like I said, I'm very happy with it), but it looks a little odd.  I'm sure it's something to do with the way I'm scoring ... ?


Thanks in advance for your help.

arlo's picture
arlo

If the bread is opening up a whole lot, perhaps you are under proofing the loaf and it should wait a bit longer before placing in the oven to bake.


It is also hard to tell since I do not know how you are scoring your bread as well.


As for the first part, I can not help since I do not know the recipe, but what I can say is if your levain is ready, then you should use when it is ready. If you have just been prepping it at night to be used the next morning, you can prep it in the morning and once it is ready late afternoon (if that is the case), use it in your dough without a doubt.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, medora66.


Welcome to TFL!


You can certainly make the SF SD without retarding the starter or the formed loafs, but it will have more flavor if you follow Reinhart's instructions.


Regarding the baked loaf shape: It would be easier to help if we saw a photo, but, from your description, I think Arlo is right about you under-proofing.


David

medora66's picture
medora66

David,


Truthfully, I can't tell whether Reinhart is suggesting I let the dough starter (is that called "levain?") sit overnight.  I don't THINK he's saying that, but I'm not sure.  If anyone out there has the book and has made this recipe, I'd love to hear from them.


~e

ermabom's picture
ermabom

It is from Artisan Breads Every Day, correct?


Yes, you can make it over 2 days. I have made the starter one evening, left it overnight to proof. The next morning, I made the final dough, let it sit for 6-8 hours to ferment and then shaped, proofed and baked the bread.


 

rockfish42's picture
rockfish42

If this is the recipe from Crust and Crumb it goes a little like this
Make firm starter, allow to double, refrigerate overnight to develop acidity.


The next day you remove the starter from the fridge allow it to come to room temp and mix the final dough. Do a bulk ferment, then shape and proof then retard the loaves overnight in the fridge to develop even more acidity.

Remove from fridge then allow loaves to proof while oven preheats and then bake.


You can skip each of the retarding steps but the bread won't be nearly as sour and the crust color will probably suffer, also you won't get those lovely little blisters.

If you just want to go directly from starter->final dough that's fine, just allow it to double as usual and mix the dough then follow the directions as-is.

Good luck!

medora66's picture
medora66

... and what I'm wanting to do is make the starter in the morning, the dough in the evening, and then the bread the next morning. 


I'm actually trying it right now ... :) ... we'll see what the results are at lunchtime tomorrow.

medora66's picture
medora66

... I know this will "work" -- the thing I'm wondering is if I'm compromising tang/quality in the sourdough by doing the first two steps in one (long) day.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi medora66.


I don't have that book. I've made PR's SF SD from Crust&Crumb (my favorite) and from BBA.


You are going to get a more complex flavor and more tang from a long, slow fermentation, but I'm betting you get good bread the way you are doing it.


Let us know.


David

medora66's picture
medora66

And let you know.  In the meantime, one other question -- I just pulled the dough out of the fridge for baking later today.  Peter Reinhart SEEMS to suggest that if I wanted to make two loaves from this dough I should have separated it out last night, after I completed making the dough, putting it in two separate bowls after the stretch and fold sequence.  I didn't because I thought one big loaf would be okay this time.  But this morning I realize I'd rather make two smaller loaves.  Will I be compromising the rise or anything if I split this dough in two when it comes time to shape the loaves later this morning?

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David