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Ficelles made with Anis Bouabsa's baguette formula

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Ficelles made with Anis Bouabsa's baguette formula

 

 

  • Flour500 gms Giusto's Baker's Choice
  • Water375 gms
  • Yeast1/4 tsp Instant
  • Salt10 gms
  1. Mix flour and water and autolyse for 20 minutes.
  2. Add yeast and mix by folding dough in the bowl.
  3. Add salt and mix by folding dough in the bowl.
  4. Mix dough by folding and stretching in the bowl for 20 strokes. Repeat this 3 more times at 20 minute intervals.
  5. Refrigerate dough, covered tightly, for 21 hours.
  6. Divide into 4 equal parts and preshape gently for baguettes.
  7. Allow preshaped pieces to rest, covered with plastic, for 1 hour.
  8. Shape into ficelles (short, thin baguettes).
  9. Proof en couche or on parchment paper dusted with semolina for 45 minutes.
  10. Pre-heat oven to 500F with baking stone in middle rack and a cast iron skillet and a metal loaf pan on the lowest rack. Preheat 45 minutes or longer before baking.
  11. 3-5 minutes before baking, place a handful of ice cubes in the loaf pan. Shut the oven door. Bring water to a boil.
  12. Transfer the ficelles to a peel and load them onto the baking stone. Pour one cup of boiling water into the skillet. Close the oven door.
  13. Turn the oven down to 480F.
  14. After 10 minutes, remove the loaf pan and the skillet from the oven.
  15. Continue baking for another 10-15 minutes until the loaves are nicely colored, the crust is hard all around and the bottom gives a hollow sound when tapped. Internal temperature should be at least 205F.
  16. Cool on a rack completely before slicing.
Anis Bouabsa is a young Parisian boulanger who won the prize for the best baguettes in Paris in 2008. He gave Janedo, a French home baker extraordinaire and a member of TFL, his formula, and Jane shared it with us. He uses a technique of a long, cold fermentation which has been used, with variations, by a number of contemporary French bakers.In addition to producing wonderfully flavored bread, it also permits the home baker to make bread using two blocks of about 2-3 hours rather than requiring longer time blocks. For example, I mixed the dough yesterday evening after dinner. I took it out of the refrigerator at about 4:30 pm this afternoon, and we ate it with dinner at 7:30 pm.These ficelles sang loudly coming out of the oven. I cooled them for only 20-30 minutes. The crust was very crunchy, and the crumb had a sweetness that would make one think there was sugar in the dough. Very yummy.Variations on Bouabsa's formula, adding 100 gms of sourdough starter and substituting 10% rye or whole wheat flour for an equal amount of white flour, make a delicious pain de campagne, which has become a favorite bread of several of us.This is described in my blog entries under "Pain de Campagne" and "San Joaquin Sourdough."Enjoy!David

 

Comments

koloatree's picture
koloatree

hi,


first, thank you for sharing!


second ive tried the directions posted but my baguettes dont seem to bloom in the oven. i suspect it must be due to my shaping skills. when shaping the baguette after the 60min rest, how 'tight' do you roll? is one to treat the dough gently or push out the air? i watched a few clips on youtube and it seems that the final shaping of the baguette is pretty tight.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, koalatree.


This should be a fairly slack (wet, sticky) dough. You should handle it very gently when shaping. You absolutely do not want to "push the air out," but you don't want to do that in any bread when you are shaping. Well, maybe popping huge bubbles in a ciabatta.


There are lots of other things that influence bloom in the oven though. You must not over-proof. You need a hot oven. You need high humidity in the oven for the first third to half of the bake.


David

koloatree's picture
koloatree

good news i made progress. after rereading many times your post, i used extra water in the skillet, proofed much less, and it made such a big difference. i tried 2 diffrent flours. 1 gold medal all purpose and the second is gold medal bread. the all purpose was much better. the breads with more of a rise was the all purpose. the first batch sort of well done. also it was in the fridge for 36+ hours. thanks for the help!


 



 



 



 



 



 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Very nice crumb, koloatree.


Crust is a bit well done. Do you think you baked them too long, or was the oven too hot?


David

koloatree's picture
koloatree

ahh yes, the first batch was overdone by accident. also i forgot to turn down the temperature! sometimes i get too excited watching the bread bake, i forget directions. i think that i figured since i keep opening the oven, i might as well set the temp slightly higher to compensate for heat loss. i will try again this wednesday.

iamonline's picture
iamonline

Hello all,


I've just recently joined the site after snooping around for awhile.  I just finished my first try at baking the ficelles using Boabsa's formula.  Everything seemed to be going well up until the preshaping step.  After the 21 hours in the fridge the dough seemed to have almost doubled (although it didn't look like a whole lot of dough I must say).  I had tons of trouble handling the dough, it was impossibly sticky.  Is this normal?  I've seen several videos of baguette shaping and mine just seemed way to soft and sticky to shape properly. 


Slashing with a razor blade was difficult as well.  Even when trying to make quick slashes the blade would stick and drag the dough.


In the end they turned out fine (a bit mishapen) but the crum was probably not as holey as it could be and the crust maybe slightly under crispy (there was a decent crispness factor but not as good as David's above).  Should it be so crispy that it's almost as if the slices have been in a toaster?


Photos:




They taste great anyways.


Liam


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Liam.


I'm glad you enjoyed your baguettes. I'll try to answer your questions.


This is a somewhat slack dough and is on the sticky side. It is easier to handle if you have developed the gluten really well. I use the stretch and fold in the bowl technique. It works really well. Here is Hamelman's description:


Hamelman's “Stretch and Fold in the Bowl” no-knead technique


Mark Sinclair (mcs) has made a really fine video of this technique. It doesn't seem to be in the TFL video library, but it should be. I managed to locate it. Here's the link:


no-knead video


It is necessary to use a light, fast touch in shaping. Pressing hard on the dough will make it stick to your hands. Strive for fast moves, leaving your hands in contact with the pieces for as short a time as possible with each manipulation.


In scoring, again, fast moves. Wet your blade before each cut.


The crust should be crisp. Leaving the baguettes in the turned off oven with the door ajar for 5-7 minutes helps dry the crust after baking. It will get soft in a couple hours or three.


Your crumb looks pretty good to me.


I hope these tips help.


BTW, standard baguettes are around 65% hydration. So the videos are often misleading. This is a slacker dough than "standard."


David

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Trying your formula and improving my baguette scoring techniques will be the focus of my upcoming weekend baking.  Would you please give me some suggestions on what I could have done differently in terms of angle, depth and handling, etc., based on my 090525 batch? Any comments are greatly appreciated.  Thank you.


Yippee

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Yippee.


I'm not sure what your question is. Your "090525 batch" was a boule, unless there is a message I can't find. Scoring boules is quite different from scoring baguettes. Both techniques are covered in my "Scoring Tutorial." I don't have anything to add to that.


If I am misunderstanding your question, please clarify.


David

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Sorry for the confusion.  I meant the '090525 Baguette Make-over' entry.  Thank you.


Yippee

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Yippee.


Thanks for the reference. Now I see.


Looking at your baguettes on Flickr, I can see how you need to change your scoring.


Assuming you want the "traditional" baguette scoring rather than the single cut I used for the ficelles, you need to make each cut almost parallel to the long axis of the baguette. Each cut should be about 4 to 5 inches long. Each cut should overlap the previous one by 1/4 to 1/3. The cuts should have about 1/2 inch of dough between them, where they overlap.



Please excuse my poor drawing, but I hope it helps.


Don't forget to hold the blade at a shallow angle to the loaf and to make each cut quickly and firmly, about 1/4 inch deep. You are creating a "flap" of dough that will, hopefully, open up and rise above the surface of the loaf during baking to create nice bloom and a nice ear.


Good luck, and let us see your results! 


David

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Here is the picture of the scored dough before it was sent in the oven:


 


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157618981352446/


 


Makes a perfect illustration of your 'wrong' sample. 


 


I bought the following three Giusto flours on my way home: 


Ultimate - high protein whole wheat - $5.99 / 5 lbs


high protein fine whole wheat - $3.69 / 5 lbs


Baker's Choice (organic unbleached?) - loose - $1.29/lb


 


BTW, my Super Peel has arrived.  Hopefully this will end my frustration of loading slack baguette dough onto the stone.  Then I don't need the baguette pan anymore.


I'll keep you posted of my results.  Thank you very much.


 


Yippee


 


 

Yippee's picture
Yippee

David:


I've put your scoring skills to use for the first time.  The results were encouraging.  Please visit my blog entry 090602 Sourdough Rye Bread. 


Your baguettes are on the way.  Thank you very much.


Yippee 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Yippee.


I saw your rye. It looks wonderful! I'm looking forward to seeing your baguettes.


David

Yippee's picture
Yippee

David:


My baguettes were over proofed last night and did not have much oven spring.  Therefore, the 'ears' did not show at all.  I'll redo it and keep you posted.  Thank you.


Yippee

Yippee's picture
Yippee

David:


I may have failed the scoring test but the taste and texture of these baguettes were phenominal.  My kids have told me that these were the best tasting baguettes I've made so far.  


Hope my next batch would be picture perfect as well.


 


Yippee

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

It will all come together for you. I have complete confidence, having seen the other beautiful breads you have made.


Positive reviews from your "customers" is always energizing, of course.


David

Yippee's picture
Yippee

David:


Please visit my blog to see my last attempt in making your baguettes.  Thanks again for your help!


Yippee

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

You are definitely making the fast progress I expected of you!


David

MISSiShrimpi's picture
MISSiShrimpi

Thanks for all the wonderful help here. After my 5th loaf I've made some progress using


Hamelman's “Stretch and Fold in the Bowl” no-knead technique


After 21 hours my dough had more air, bubbles, and activity that I had ever seen. I wasn't really sure where to go from there hoping to not mess it up so I went back to recipe written above (and cut and pasted steps7-16 below, now numbered 1-10).


I divided the dough into 4 pieces VERY CAREFULLY as instructed but felt like I lost some of the air and bubbles. After resting for an hour I VERY CAREFULLY "shaped into ficelles" and here I felt like I lost even more air and bubbles. i DON'T THINK i EVER RECOVERED FROM THERE AS (please excuse the caps) as during the resting times I never got any more rise. Could someone please go into more detail about how to exactly proceed following the 21 hours in the fridge. I felt like I was so close only to watch it go out the window after waiting the 21 hours. The taste was good, the crumb was fair but my bread didn't "Blow" like I want it to. Any help is Greatly Appreciated. Thanks.



  1. Allow preshaped pieces to rest, covered with plastic, for 1 hour.

  2. Shape into ficelles (short, thin baguettes).

  3. Proof en couche or on parchment paper dusted with semolina for 45 minutes.

  4. Pre-heat oven to 500F with baking stone in middle rack and a cast iron skillet and a metal loaf pan on the lowest rack. Preheat 45 minutes or longer before baking.

  5. 3-5 minutes before baking, place a handful of ice cubes in the loaf pan. Shut the oven door. Bring water to a boil.

  6. Transfer the ficelles to a peel and load them onto the baking stone. Pour one cup of boiling water into the skillet. Close the oven door.

  7. Turn the oven down to 480F.

  8. After 10 minutes, remove the loaf pan and the skillet from the oven.

  9. Continue baking for another 10-15 minutes until the loaves are nicely colored, the crust is hard all around and the bottom gives a hollow sound when tapped. Internal temperature should be at least 205F.

  10. Cool on a rack completely before slicing.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, MISSiShrimpi.


I'm not clear as to what didn't work. You got good taste and good crumb. What wasn't good? Photos would help.


What you describe is little expansion during proofing, as I understand it. This could be just that you needed to give the baguettes more time. It might also be that your weren't gentle enough in pre-shaping and shaping them. This takes practive.


When you say they didn't "blow," are you talking about oven spring?


David

rockymountainandrew's picture
rockymountainandrew

Thank you so much for sharing this recipe/technique.


Although I have only baked a few Lahey/Bittman "no knead" breads before , I took the jump/challenge with this one and I am thrilled with the results. It is doable by a rookie (with a firm but not overly hard hand).


I made this recipe exactly as written and then a few days later did it with the substitution of 200 grams of flour and water with the addition of a friend's sour dough which I then used a bowl stretch and fold x 3 with 2 stretch and fold on the counter to practice that technique but I did not do the  21 hour cool temp rest. Both turned out amazing. I have not yet graduated to putting pics of my bread and crumb on line so as to then link them to this site but trust me the results of this base can be tremendous even to those with minimal experience!


I do think however without viewing a number of Youtube videos of the stretching and folding, shaping and forming the results would have been much worse. Seeing the activity was critical I think to handling this this dough.


For those wondering just what is produced, the yield was 4 "smallish" loaves, about 15 inches long, since that was the longest dimension of my pizza stone.


Half a loaf would be just right for a large sandwich for one (but I could not limit myself to only that) or two great bases for garlic bread to accompany a meal.


Cheers!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Thanks for letting us know about your success.


David

metropical's picture
metropical

curious David.  Why both the skillet with boiling water and the ice cubes in the pan?  Just for the quantity of steam?


I normally steam by adding some water to a pyrex pan while the oven comes to temp, then add 2 or 3 cups to the pan at bake time for the first 10 mins.


 


I assume that the cast iron isn't "injured" with this use?

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

As it happens, I'm not using that technique any more. However, the idea is to have the oven humid when you load it and to have a burst of steam right after loading. What you are doing probably accomplishes the same thing. However, you are not going to be getting the burst of steam with pyrex that you do with cast iron - especially with the lava rocks.


We have pretty hard water, so the cast iron skillet gets mineral deposits. I bought a new skillet to use just for oven steaming.


David

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

Hi David,


Just a few questions before I try this on the weekend:


Where do you get these plastic scrapers?


Any recommendations, from you or others on shaping these sticky boogers when you have limited space? Love the stretch/fold in the bowl method while living in my RV but still figuring out where the heck I'm going to work with my doughs.


I'm going to be trying this on my outdoor gas grill so any extra suggestions regarding this would be appreciated as well. My plan is to pick up some saltillo tiles to cover the grill grates and then place these ficelles on a cookie sheet with parchment paper.


Hoping I love this recipe, can use it as my everyday practice recipe to learn how to work with stretchy rye dough without the expense of wasting so much rye.


Do you have a comprable whole grain recipe you could point me towards with the no-knead method?


Tracy


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Tracy.


You can get plastic scrapers through breadtopia.com, just for one place. But, if you already have a rubber or silicon spatula, that works fine.


I have no experience baking on a grill and no experience with the no-knead method with whole grains.


David

Misheil's picture
Misheil

Dear David,


Since taking a Le Cordon Bleu baking class in Paris, I have been hooked on baking.  I spent countless amount of hours and butter to try to perfect the croissant in my own home oven.  Now, with a better understanding on protein content, overproofing, etc, I felt it was time to jump in and start the long road in perfecting the baguette.  I have been reading and re-reading and re-reading (can i re-iterate the re-reading part) the blogs of your journey to perfecting the baguette, that you, Mark, Janedo and others have so unselfishly been posting.  Although LCB had a different recipe for the baguette, I decided to try Anis Bouabsa's version.  This is what I did:


I followed your instrustions, BUT, used Mark's 5 second kneading with the dough hook 3x technique instead of the no-knead version you posted.  I don't know why, but after the 18 hour retardation (really wanted to have them for dinner), I inadvertantly divided them into 3.  290 grams, 290 grams, and finally 308 grams.  After I had pre-shaped them, I realized you had mentioned that you divided your dough 4x - making each pre-shaped dough appx. 220g. each.  I was off my 70 g for each pre-shaped dough.  I was really stressed.  But, I had no choice but to forge forward.


After an hour, I did shape them, but did not feel that the dough was responsive to rolling.  Is this usual???  I had to stretch them out a bit.  And I let them proof en couche for 45 min.  I put them directly on pizza stone at 500 degrees with steam for 10 of the 25 min.  I found that I could not go the entire 25 minutes since it was starting to burn.  I also realized how important scoring the ficelles correctly assists in a better baguette.  Anyways so my questions:


1.)  Why did it burn at 20 min??  Heavier dough, I would think would require more baking time.  I did forget to decrease temp to 480.  Would that have made that big of a difference?


2.) How do I know that I have scored deeply enough?  I don't want to deflate?


3.)  After the dough has been shaped into the final ficelles, did you proof under a plastic bag or leave it open?


The results:  Despite the burn, the crumb was amazing.  Big holes and it did have a sweet taste.  I was really surprised with the sweet taste.  Great crust.  I should have taken a picture, but it was all gone by the time I thought about taking them.


Thanks for the help.


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Mishell.


How the dough handles depends on its consistency and on gluten development. The same hydration level will yield different doughs depending on how your flour absorbs water. Your description of your shaping issue suggests your dough was pretty slack (wet). You sound like you dealt with it well. Note that shaping should be done on the board without flour. Now to your questions:


1. I preheat the oven to 500ºF but turn it down to 460-480ºF immediately after loading the loaves. Yes. 20ºF makes a big difference in how dark the loaves will be.


2. Slack doughs should be scored more shallowly than firmer doughs. 1/4 inch deep is about right for the Bouabsa baguettes. Scoring should be at a shallow angle for baguettes. Steam helps the cuts open up, but too much steam tends to obliterate the ears.


3. I proof baguettes on a linen couche. The couche is folded over the loaves. If it is warm, I may also dust the loaves with flour and cover them with plastic during proofing. 


It sounds like your baguettes turned out well, except for the dark crust. I'd love to see photos. Next time, eh?


David

Misheil's picture
Misheil

Hi David,


Thanks for your help!  I'm on my 2nd attempt at baguettes this am.  This time I've doubled the recipe.  I'm assuming keeping it at 75% hydration, using 1/2 tsp of instant yeast per kilo works.  I will definitely remember to turn it down the next time. 


The 1st time I attempted to make baguettes, I mixed the dough using my Kitchenaid artisan 325 W mixer and it was fine for 1 recipe.  Since I doubled the recipe, i am using my Kitchenaid Pro 610.  Incorporating Mark's advice, I lessened the amount of time on #2 speed to 1 minute and increased stir speed time.  The KA Pro is a new machine, and this is the 1st time I've used it, so I hope it will create same results as the 1st batch.


Thanks again, and I will definitely take pictures and post them.


Marie


 

Misheil's picture
Misheil

Dear David,


I'm uploading the pics of my 2nd attempt of Anis Bouabsa's baguettes.  I can't seem to get the scoring right.  I feel like I've scored enough, but once in the oven, I can immediately tell I didn't score deep enough.  What do I need to do?


Also, this is my 1st attempt to upload pics.  I hope it works.


Thanks,


Marie

Misheil's picture
Misheil

Before Autolyse - test elasticity of dough


Pre-Autolyse


After 22 hour retardation in Fridge


After 22 hr. retardation in fridge


pre-shaped en couche


Pre-shaped en couche


Scored and shaped


Shaped and scored.  I'm not sure if I'm scoring right.



Right out of the oven.  Appx. weight 225-230 gms.


Crumb 3


Crumb



A little blurry but another view of the crumb.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Marie.


The baguettes look very good. Lovely crumb!


The problem with your scoring is not that it's too shallow. For classic baguette scoring, the cuts need to be almost parallel to the long axis of the loaf and overlapping about 1/4 of their length. Like this:



I hope this helps.


David

Misheil's picture
Misheil

Hi David,


I feel like I'm degassing the dough when I score it along it's length.  But, I'll definitely try it and let you know how it goes. 


Thanks,


Misheil

SaraBClever's picture
SaraBClever

I will keep this in mind.  I definitely was not scoring right.  I can't wait to try--I know there's only so much you can do in a home oven but every little bit helps, eh?

Doughtagnan's picture
Doughtagnan

Hi David


I'm having a bash at your baguette and was interested re the amount of fast acting yeast as the one I use in the UK (Doves Farm) suggests 1tsp per 500g of flour.  Is just 1/4 tsp enough per 500g? or does the long retard make up for this......


Cheers


Steve

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Steve.


I don't know if your "fast acting yeast" is the same as the SAF instant yeast I use, but 1/4 tsp. is the correct amount, and it does the job. I'm sure the long fermentation contributes.


BTW, since writing up this method, I've added two stretch and folds on the board at 45 minute intervals after the S&F in the bowl and before retardation. This has been a substantial improvement.


David

Doughtagnan's picture
Doughtagnan

Thanks David, will try that next time as it is now retarding in the fridge, I did use 'bout 1/4 tsp for half the recipe, and will let you know how that turns out, it is quite a wet dough to work with and I did give it little  stretch n fold before popping it into to the fridge. I did also add a splodge of sourdough starter (rye) for more of a pain campagne taste and as ever a little of my friends greek olive oil!, i'm also baking the Pierre Nury rustic rye tomorrow as well so hopefully plenty of good bread for the weekend cheese board and breakfasts


Cheers, Steve

Misheil's picture
Misheil

Good morning David,


I have a new oven.  Out with the old 24" and in with the new Thermador Professional 30" convection.  Although I'm super excited about the oven and what it can do, I'm perplexed as to how to bake my baguettes.  I normally heat a cast iron pan and boil water.  Put the pan at bottom of oven and put the baguettes on stone.  Then I pour boiling water in the pan to create steam.


How do I create steam in a convection oven?  I've read that you can really use the convection fan to your benefit.  Does that mean I preheat the oven using the convection mode, put the pan on a rack, put dough on stone, and pour water in pan?  Do I turn off the convection mode and switch to bake after I put the water in?


Thanks much in advance.......


Misheil


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I have a KitchenAid convection oven. I pre-heat at 500/convection. I don't see a clear difference between baking with convection or conventional settings, except you do need to lower the temperature for convection. My oven seems to heat very evenly even with conventional baking.


I think different makes of ovens may differ in their difference.


David

Boboshempy's picture
Boboshempy

So, I made the ficelles and I followed the recipe accurately.  The dough was quite slack so scoring was unsuccessful and came out more like a Pain a l'ancienne.  Crumb, taste, and crust were great but I was not happy with the looks.  Should I have added more flour as I stretched & folded to bring it to French dough consistency?  Well see picture to see what it looked like.


Nick

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Nick.


I use anywhere between 360 and 375 gms of water to make these. How the dough turns out depends on the flour and the weather. It also depends on how well you develop the gluten. For wetter doughs, a couple additional stretch and folds on the board can make a big difference.


I'd recommend you try making these a few more times using different hydration levels in the above range and see what pleases you the most.


BTW, many like the more rustic look you got. How was the crumb and flavor?


David

Boboshempy's picture
Boboshempy

Thanks David!


I did an additional 2 S&Fs at 45 minute intervals as per your comment a couple posts ago and I could see a very big improvement in the gluten development when I was S&Fing the dough the last 2 times. 


I used KA French Style flour and I don't think I am liking it.  I want to try with AP flour and see what the difference would be.  The crumb and flavor were great, better than any Pain a l'ancienne I have made in the past with the same flour.  I have no problem working with slack dough and I am really great at getting the rustic look but some day I would like to make some pretty baguettes, haha.


Is this the same formula you use for making regular French baguettes?


Nick

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Nick.


KAF French-style flour is relatively low gluten and makes an exceedingly extensible dough. This is desirable for shaping baguettes, but it works best at about 65% hydration. It doesn't absorb as much water as KAF AP, not to mention Bread Flour. You might like the flour better at lower hydration.


I've made baguettes using 6 or 8 different formulas. The ones I like best are Bouabsa's, Gosselin's and proth5's. All are good. Each is different. I have descriptions and formula's for all of these on my TFL blog. If you really like making baguettes, and If you want the most traditional baguettes, try proth5's. They are made with levain (no added yeast) and are wonderful, if you have all the techniques. For me, they had the best flavor second to the Gosselin's which are quite slack and challenging to mix but have amazing flavor. 


David

metropical's picture
metropical

Nick


Can you recommend a recipe with 50g of ww flour?


Currently I have a bag of Pills BfB that's, I'd guess, a little lower in the protein level then is desired.  Should I substitute some KAB?

Boboshempy's picture
Boboshempy

metropical,


If you have BBA the Poolish Baguettes recipe is a WW French bread. I have not made it but I have heard good things about it.  Or, you can make Reinhart's Pain de Campagne.  It's 15.8% whole wheat flour, and is awesome.  I make it all the time and you can shape it any way you want.


Also, I don't see why you can't use any of these baguette recipes and substitute 50g of WW in for some of the regular flour.  I know a lot of people substitute some Rye or WW for some added flavor in their baguettes with great results.


I believe BFB is a bread flour and it is higher protein than AP flour.


Tell me how it goes and post some pictures.


Nick

Petey's picture
Petey



AlyaBushe's picture
AlyaBushe

Hi,


Some questions:


For how long do you mix flour and water at the first step?


is it important the dough gets any shape (I mean getting less sticky) during the process?


Why don't you add yeast at the first step?


Thank you!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, AlyaBushe.


The flour and water isn't mixed by time. It's mixed until it forms a mass incorporating all the flour and water. The dough will be very sticky at this point. The purpose of this step (the autolyse) is for the flour to absorb the water and for gluten to start forming. The dough gets less sticky as the gluten is developed with time and stretch and folds.


The yeast could be added at the first step, especially if you are using dry yeast. Traditionally, the autolyse is done before adding leavening or salt. 


David

jonswifelori's picture
jonswifelori

well, it was fun...but I made some mistakes.  Well, maybe I could have played with the dough more....or added just a little more flour.


The taste is amazing...and everyone ate every bite within 20 minutes out of the oven.  I had to hurry and take the pic after the first one was gone!  I will continue to do over and hopefully get better!  My bread

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