The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Storage of Bread

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smokeandashes's picture
smokeandashes

Storage of Bread

I am just starting to make bread but as a single person I find that the recipes for most breads are too much for me to eat in a timely fashion before they begin to go bad. Does anyone have suggestions for storage?

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Enriched breads (those with fats or oils or eggs) freeze extremely well when sealed in plastics bags. I almost always bake more than we can eat and freeze two out of three of the loaves.

For quick breads I usually recommend small loaf pans anyway. Once again, bake three loaves and freeze two in an airtight bag.

Baguettes and crusty french breads don't tend to freeze as well, but batches along the lines of this size only make 2 or 3 small baguettes. If you eat some with dinner, some toasted for breakfast, and a sandwich at lunch (as I typically do) it'll disappear quickly enough. ;^)

smokeandashes's picture
smokeandashes

Do you leave your bread out on the counter or do you place it in the refrigerator? As you can guess, I am unsure of all the nuances with regard to bread keeping.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Crusty breads I keep on the counter in a paper bag and try to eat quickly (3 days tops). Soft, moist breads I usually keep on the counter in an airtight plastic bag. Unless the weather is particularly hot, a loaf stored in such a manner is OK for at least a week.

If I am going to be using a loaf of soft bread just for making toast I do occasionally put it in the refrigerator. The fridge tends to dry the loaf out a bit, but that isn't a big deal if the toaster is the target, and the loaf will keep for at least two weeks in there. I find refrigerated bread too dry for sandwiches or straight eating though.

I hope that helps.