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yozzause's picture
yozzause

What a mouthfull of a title and what and what a mouth full of a bread


I have recently made a very nice Dark Irish Stout and retained the dregs from the bottom of the fermenter. The stout has just been sampled with  a very big tick of approval it was a very vigourous brew and performed very well indeed. i took 250 grams of stoneground wholemeal flour and added 250mls of my brewery sludge  and bought it together and set it aside as a soaker.


the container shows the brewing dregs that i have kept in the fridge for a few weeks now.



the above pic shows  the dough as it was taken after bulk fermentation marks on the bowl give an indication of the rise.


The soaker showed good signs of activity after 6 hours  but it was bed time so it ended up with a soak time of  15 hours, the soaker was still retaining its gas the nextmorning and so the to the mix was added 250grams of plain white flour (AP) just supermarket home brand stuff 10 grams of cooking salt 20 grams of blended oil 20 grams of malt extract and a further 100mls of stout giving a total hydration of 70% NO YEAST or other culture were added. the kenwood chef was employed for the mix and toward the end 100grams of sunflower seed kernals were mixed in the dough was finished at 9.30am  and from the picture above the dough was marked on the cling film and a good rise resulted after a bulk fermentation time of 5 and a half hours.


The dough was tinned up and was slightly small for the tin @ 900grams the loaf was given a full proof of about 5 hours and baked in a gas oven on 200 deg C for 35 to 40 minutes. little or no oven spring was evident.


The aroma was delightfull but i went to bed as soon as it came out of the oven but was delighted to have a wonderfully moist and full flavoured bread for both breakfast and again as sandwhiches for lunch.






So although we do not celebrate thanksgiving here in Australia i think this would have been a worthy loaf for such an occasion, perhaps Australia day in January when we have a big firework display over Perth city and  we watch it from the back of my Hartley yacht in the Canning River with a nice cold SAV BLANC


kind regards Yozzause

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Plain sourdough is not something I make often, though I intended to  but I seems to easily get distracted by multigrain and/or fruit breads. Somehow, I feel like one last weekend and I picked the Pain au Levain with whole wheat from jeffrey Hamelman's Bread cookbook.



The recipe uses stiff levain build which is also a good timing that I can convert my liquid starter (100% hydration) to stiff starter (60% hydration) before I am going away in the next two weeks for a month and won't have chances to feed my lovely pet starter, Jerry. I was afraid that he would be starving (for flour and water) and pass away while I'm away.



Thanks to a post on The Fresh Loaf about the sourdough starter feeding. Apparently, stiff starter is more resilient than liquid one. It is more likely that it will survive after not being fed for a while. I only need to feed Jerry a few times when I'm back from holiday to wake him up and come back to his cheerful and active self.


This bread has a pronounced sour flavour, which I believe is the result of stiff levain build with mixed flour in it (mixed of rye and bread flour). The crumb is soft, open and chewy. It's a good complement to olive oil with a bit of dukkah.  



For more details, you can visit ;  


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/2010/11/sometimes-all-you-need-is-plain.html


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

 

For turkey day this year the family get-together will be smaller than usual, 18 rather than the more usual 25 to 30. Maybe that's not a bad thing, though. I volunteered to bring the bread and a dessert.


I have wanted to try a baklava since turosdolci posted her version. Then there was breadsong's bread pumpkin, which I thought way cool.


Just in case, I  put some dinner rolls on my list, and since I was about to run out of sandwich bread, and I was using the same formula for the rolls, I mixed up a four pound batch of dough.


Get the picture? Three breads, each requiring a different time and temperature combo and a pastry requiring yet another. Now David (dmsnyder) may feel completely at ease doing six breads, five pies, separate menus for those who keep kosher and the family vegans, and a partridge in a pear tree. I, on the other hand am a bit stressed.


Let me say that I  expect the baklava to taste wonderful, but to say that prep time is 30 minutes might be understating the case. I think if I never try to  handle philo dough again, it will be too soon. For someone with a palsy from a bout with Gillain-Barré Syndrome back in '98, those sheets are just a bit flimsy. Lots of patchwork in that pastry. But, it did  get done Tuesday evening, and it should be properly cured by dinner Thursday. Now, if I can just borrow a forklift to carry it to the car.



The bread pumpkin was interesting. I  had made a test bake, and found the dough less wet than I expected, and with 25% whole grain flours (I only had whole grain rye), it was pretty dense. I  used medium rye this time, but I think the canned pumpkin puree was considerably wetter than that previously used. The dough was wet. Really wet. Even with a new razor, slashing was an adventure. The loaf does look interesting, if not nearly the perfection breadsong got. It might have been easier had I made the same size loaves she made. Mine was just shy of 1kg.



The rolls are nothing special, simply a sourdough white sandwich bread in 2oz balls. I spritzed them before putting them in the oven,  and the oven spring was enough to cause some  of the rolls to split. I consider that a Good Thing.



I don't have a digital still camera, so  I got out the video with the dead battery. :shock: They're always dead when you need them. So, charge up the battery and shoot a couple  of pics. That's why it's 6AM Thursday morning and I haven't been to bed yet. I'll get a few hours sleep, load the car and head to my niece's for dinner and football.


I hope you all have as good a day as I  will.


cheers,


gary

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

With a house full of company, my little grandaughter helped me make this apple and pumpkin pie.  We used Caroline's buttermilk crust recipe..ran a little short on dough..so didn't get a fancy crimped edge..no matter, won't affect the taste... we also made a couple of pumpkin pies too..no problem just pieced in the edges.  Making a deep dish apple next time I will triple the recipe..also 3X for 2 large pumpkin pies.  I like plenty of dough to work with and can always make cinnamon twists with extra dough...we like our crust a little on the thickish side...especially when it's this buttery tasty and DIL requested a thicker crust, made me smile! 


Grand daughter picked the Indian girl pie bird for Thanksgiving, she liked her better than the Indian boy!  I have a lot of pie birds!



 


 


Happy Thanksgiving to TFLoafers!


Sylvia

Nickisafoodie's picture
Nickisafoodie

Boule covereduncovered on left


 


I made one large 7 pound recipe for two loaves (Hamelman's "Vermont Sourdough with Increased Whole Wheat").  Given they were 3.5 lbs each I baked one at a time. Both were retarded 13 hours in the fridge (okay, one was 12 and one was 13 hours) then placed directly on the hot stone after slashing, steam used first 12 minutes.


The first loaf used a large stainless bowl covering for the first 15 minutes of baking.  When removing the bowl some of the dough stuck to the side and pulled away, but it finished nice and the tear is not too noticable.  Thus my decision to bake the second loaf without the bowl - a big mistake (on the left in the first picture and in the single shot picture). 


You can see how the bowl made the first loaf on the right better looking with tiny bubbles and a nice crust.  The "mistake loaf" on the left and bottom has a dull looking crust in addition to a demarcation line about one inch up the side and all over the bottom which essentially matches the look and sheen of the crust from the first covered loaf.  The better looking blisters and color must be from the heat of the stone which can be seen when looking at the side of the loaf.   The top part of the uncovered loaf in the second picture doesn't have the nice color and tiny bubbles on the skin that the covered one has. 


I expect them both to look and taste the same when they cut on Thanksgiving- but visually speaking (and poor slashing technique aside) the loaf on the right looks much better.  So my take away is to stay with a covered loaf going forward. 


One other thought that surprised me: the oven spring was better on these breads coming right out of the refigerator and into the oven than those of the past where I would take them out one hour to warm up at room temp while the oven was preheating.  The chilled dough seems to not spread out to lower height and wider loaf by keeping the pent up energy intact until released by the heat - resulting in a higher rising loaf than otherwise. 


Happy Thanksgiving all...

rayc's picture
rayc



Because I did not want to throw out some left over starter, I made Flo's 123 formula.  I thought it turned out pretty good.  Loaf got cut before I got a pic, but have pics of  what was not consumed.  Every body here rated it good, but to me it didn't have the degree of sour tang to it that I like.  Crust was definitely chewy and the crumb was chewy also. Overall it was  a good bake. 


Formula: 


 250 grams   White Starter (67% hydration)


498 grams    Water


747 grams    White Bread Flour


18   grams    Salt


 


Baked at 450 degrees on convection  for 20 minutes covered with a aluminum pan.  (Thanks Susan)


Removed pan and baked another 20 minutes.   Didn't turn oven down, which next time I will turn oven down to 425 after 20 minutes.  Looking forward to the next time. 


 


I put the good things first The Sandwich with a cup of tea.  I have to say it hit the spot.




 crumb shot:




 


  


 crust shot:  I'm happy with the aount of oven spring I got.



Crust Shot:  Other side 



 


This was a good bake.  Just need to work on shaping a bit.  Practice makes perfect,


Ray


 

amolitor's picture
amolitor

We broke up a jack-o-lantern for soup the other day (just a regular pumpkin, not a sugar-pie or anything, not a pumpkin especially for eating but of course edible). Had a couple cups of mashed baked pumpkin left over, so I thought I'd see what happened when I put it in bread. I wasn't expecting much flavor, since the regular pumpkins just don't have that much. The answer, in short, was: Eh, it's bread. Sort of moist.


The long answer:


Evening of Day 0:



  • 1 cup whole flour

  • 1 cup warm water

  • 2 T active sourdough starter


Let sit out overnight, covered, until you get a nice active/ripe sponge the next day.


Morning of Day 1



  • 1 cup warm water

  • 2 cups mashed baked pumpkin.. gunk

  • ripe sponge from last night

  • 4 cups bread flour (roughly)


Mix in the bowl to get a kneadable dough. I used a 10 minute autolyze at this point because I wanted to make muself some coffee.


This is where it gets interesting: The dough was kneadable without sticking on a wooded board (just barely -- this is my preferred dough texture). I kneaded in:



  • 2 and 1/2 tsp salt

  • 1 tsp ground coriander (I think this was an error)


and kept kneading. The dough kept getting sticker, and I kept dusting aggressively with flour. I think this not uncommon when you're adding vegetable matter to a dough, I have a potato bread recipe that's similar. I think the vegetables give up water as you work them. I kneaded for about 10 minutes on board, working in probably 3/4 cup of flour just to maintain it at "almost but not quite sticking to the floured board." At this point I gave up, and started kneading it as a high-hydration dough (slap it down, let it stick, streeeeetch a bit and fold it over, rotate 90 degrees and repeat) for another ten minutes. Thankfully, it didn't get much wetter.


Bulk rise a couple hours, with a couple stretch-and-folds, the dough came together beautifully. However, it tasted TERRIBLE, or possibly I was having a stroke. I *think* the coriander was doing something unpleasant, so the dough tasted fine for a few seconds, and then there was this weird bitter thing that happened in your mouth.


Anyways. Shaped into a boule, proofed in improvised banneton, preheat over to 475, bake with steam at 425 for 45 minutes. Probably should have baked longer.


The bad taste seems to be gone (thankfully) and what we're left with is a completely unremarkable sourdough that's rather moist (almost gummy) and has a lovely color. It's too moist to toast easily, which is a bore, I'd bake it another 10 or 15 minutes if I was to do it again (which I won't -- this recipe was a bust, to my mind!)


It's the best looking loaf I've ever baked, though, so by golly, here's some pictures:




 


Crumb very moist. You can see bits of pumpkin in it! Sorry for the sort of lousy photo, this was in the evening:


 


Mebake's picture
Mebake

This is my recipe of a 50% sourdough spelt.



  Total Dough      
           
A/P flour 50% 539 grams    
spelt Flour 50% 539 grams    
Water 65% 701 grams    
Salt 2% 22 grams    
Total 167% 1,800      
           
  Levain Build      
        Prefermented Flour
A/P flour 100% 204 grams 35%  
Water 60% 122 grams    
Sourdough 25% 51 grams    
Total 185% 377      
           
  Final Dough      
           
A/P flour 310 grams      
spelt  Flour 539 grams      
Water 553 grams      
Salt 22 grams      
All levain 377 grams      
Total 1,800 grams      
           

Procedure:

Day1:

In the evening, take you starter out of fridge, refresh it , and leave it on counter to double. Refresh it again before you go to sleep in such a way that it would double overnight.

Day2:

In the morning, refresh the starter in propotions that would allow the starter to ripen in maximum of 4-5 hours. I chose to bake during week day, therefore i brought the starter with me to work to build my final levain. I was afraid of over ripening during my duty, so i reduced the starter in the levain from 25% (51g) to 25 grams. it took the levain 11 hours to ripen @60 hydration at 78F !

At Home, i cut the levain and dissolved it in the recipe water (tepid water), and then added the remaining ingredients except the salt. I Autolyzed the dough for 1/2 hour, and then spread the dough, sprinkled all salt on top, kneaded the dough until a smooth ball is formed. I was wary of my mixing , so as to not to over develop the spelt.

I immediately transfered the dough in its iled bowl to the refrigerator for an 18 hour retardation.

Day3:

In the morning, I removed the dough( which has increased 50% in volume) to a bench and stretched and folded it letter wise. The dough was returned to the bowl, and i went to work.

On the evening, and 18 hours later, i removed the dough (which increased 50% in volume) to a bench divided it into two (1000g, and 800g).An hour later, i preshaped the still cold dough into a boule and a batard. An hour later, i shaped the doughs, and inverted them into floured bannetons.

I left the doughs to ferment for 3.5 hours. I preheated the oven with a stone and a pan filled with lava rocks to 470F for 30 minutes, and then inverted the doughs onto a peal and transfered the doughs to be baked for 15 minutes with steam, and 20 minutes without.

The flavor was mildly tangy, and spelt flavor was quite discernable. I liked it, though i would prefer a more hydrated dough (70%).

Khalid

 

occidental's picture
occidental

After reading several posts about Hammelman's Vermont sourdough with increased whole grain I decided to give it a try.  I've been impressed with my results from the basic Vermont Sourdough and this version didn't let me down either.  I found the errata sheet on the web here: ( http://mellowbakers.com/ErrataSheetJune2010.pdf ) and used those amounts to put the formula together.  I proofed one loaf in the kitchen (~67 degrees) and the other in the garage (~50 degrees) to account for the extra time the second loaf would be proofing while the first one baked.  I baked the loaf from the kitchen first followed about an hour later by the one from the garage.  I baked both using the 'magic bowl' steaming method.  There was quite a difference in the loafs. The kitchen loaf didn't have much oven spring, while the one from the cooler garage had great oven spring and is one of the best looking loafs I have ever baked.  The crumb is similar in both loaves.  The taste is great, although I can't say there is much of a taste difference between the two loaves. I will definitely be making this formula again.  Here is a pic of the loaf with the great oven spring:


occidental's picture
occidental

I've been attempting to improve my baguette making skills over the past few weeks.  This weekend I came up with my own formula based on a few of the things I learned from my last effort's with Pat's (proth5's) baguette formula.  Most notably I wanted to come up with a relatively low hydration formula using AP flour.  I also wanted to get a bit of whole wheat flour in the mix as well, and come up with enough dough to make two decent sized baguettes .  With that in mind I came up with the following formula which I calculate to be at 66% total hydration:



  • 100 g starter (60% hydration)

  • 280 g AP flour

  • 30 g ww flour

  • 210 g water

  • 12 g salt


I followed the steps below:



  • Refresh starter the night before

  • Mix all ingredients in a bowl to a shaggy mass, allow to autolyse 30 minutes

  • Fold in bowl, about 20 strokes two times at 30 minute intervals

  • Remove from bowl, stretch and fold then place in container and bulk ferment approximately 3 hours

  • Divide dough and shape two baguettes, allow to rise approximately 2 hours

  • Bake in a preheated oven at 475


All went well, including shaping, which I always struggle with when making baguettes.  At this hydration scoring goes better for me than if I am working with a higher hydration dough.  Here is a visual of what I came up with:



I was pretty pleased with crust and crumb and went to the taste test and that is where the disappointment set in.  This was the flattest tasting, most flavorless bread I can recall tasting.  I sat and thought "What went wrong?"  The solution didn't come to me right away, but later in the afternoon I remembered I didn't ever add the salt!  I've forgotten the salt before but I've always remembered at some point and have been able to get it worked in before baking.  Well, I guess it's another lesson learned.  I finished up the first loaf with the help of lots of honey and jam.  I took the second loaf and did with it what I have been doing with a lot of my leftover baguettes:  sliced, added butter and garlic salt, wrapped it in foil and placed it in a ziplock in the freezer.  I come home from work and throw the foil wrapped frozen loaf in the oven for about 30 minutes at 325 and you have great tasting garlic bread to accompany your dinner.   Hopefully using it as garlic bread will help the flat taste!

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