The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Zeb

Here are a couple of pics of the bread as it turned out in the end on Sunday. It tasted lovely!




Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

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Zeb

I've been talking to DrFugawe who has recently been baking a Nancy Silverton apple bread and this month I am going to bake the Hamelman Normandy Apple Bread.


I have come to realise, and it's probably been discussed here before, that cider in America is not the same thing as cider in England.


The confusion lies particularly with the term 'sweet cider'. To an English person, that means an alcoholic fermented and usually carbonated drink made from pressed apples which happens to be sweet. We have dry, sweet, semi-sweet, sparkling ciders, all alcoholic, and then there's scrumpy too, if you live in my part of the world. 


To an American, it means apple juice pure and simple. Now I know.  It's like corn flour and cornflour, again two different things, or american pumpernickel and Westphalian pumpernickel,  or American cheddar and English Cheddar. Same names, but a world of difference. 


So if anyone else from this side of the Atlantic (England)  is baking from 'Bread', be aware that JH doesn't intend for you to use your local organic cider, he just wants you to use some nice freshly pressed organic apple juice along with your home dried apple pieces.


Having said that is there any reason for not using some good English cider?  I was thinking that if I treated the cider in a similar way to the way Dan Lepard makes barm bread, that would be a good jumping off point for an excellent sourdough. Has anyone here tried doing that?


 


Happy Baking


 


Zeb

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Zeb

Inspired by Franko and many others, here I am joining in finally with the baking in a pot theme. This dough went straight into  a hot enamel lined cast iron pot, no parchment, no oil and came out clean as a whistle....  plus I must mention Dr Fugawe's awesome home grown Oregon starter (Grapplestein) which has emigrated safely to the UK and raised this one for me! I still don't know how to get those pointy slash ends, maybe I should start the slashes higher up or not cut so deep?  Joanna @ Zeb Bakes


Grappy 2


 


Pic below is a crumb shot of my first attempt at using a pot the day before  (which was a smaller loaf and higher hydration) The dough is a straight sourdough with a mix of strong white flour, spelt, rye and swiss dark flour, a little yoghurt, a spoonful of organic barley malt and seasalt


Grappy 1

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Zeb

This is the formula for a bread I made last year that gives you a packed bunch of flavours and uses the old bread as a soaker in the dough. I've been reading Mini's post with great interest as I'm keen to try this and this time put the old rye bread in with the starter and see what difference it makes, sounds very exciting.


 


Anyway I thought I would like to share this one with you


Linseed, Millet, Sunflower, Pumpkin and sesame plus an old bread soaker and whatever else you fancy rye bread based on from Jeffrey Hamelman’s linseed and rye bread in Bread A Baker’s book of Techniques and Recipes and Jeremy’s post on Stir the Pots.  The old bread starter is the magic ingredient.


Ingredients


Cold Soaker: I used what I have in the cupboard..


Old rye bread 50g - this is what you call 'altus'  I guess


25 g linseed -  vary these seeds in the soaker depending on preference, i.e. sunflowers, pumpkins etc etc


25g millet - again use anything that you like to put in your bread!


20 g malted rye grains  or any cracked smallish grain you have that you like
 - these are small pieces of rye that have been malted by the mill (in this case Shipton Mill in England)


165g water


Starter


30g mature rye leaven


200g lukewarm or room temperature water


225 g dark rye flour (whole rye flour)


Make both the above at the same time,  12 hours plus before you want to mix the dough, depends how active your starter is and how sour you like your ryebread


For the dough


Both the soaker and the starter as above


I put them into a mixing bowl and mixed with a electric hand mixer on a slow speed just to make sure the old bread now squishy, got broken up and mixed in.


Then added


370 g strong white flour


105 g water


15 - 20 g salt (whatever you normally do, or maybe slightly less as the old bread has salt in it.)


about 150g worth of toasted pumpkin and sunflower seeds, sesame whatever you like,


1/4 teaspoon of easy bake yeast  you can leave this out if you want to be just sourdough,


Makes a quite sticky dough. Leave for 10 to 20 minutes. Do a quick knead and then leave it alone. It becomes less sticky after a while. 


It’s not particularly high in water, I don’t know how to work out the hydration, it might rise a bit more if you use a higher hydration?


If you have the yeast you can do bulk ferment for about an hour and then scale and shape and then the second ferment for an hour, but I did both for double this the second time, because I kept forgetting it and it seemed fine too.


Scaled and shaped.


I put seeds in the bottom of the banneton but you could also roll the dough in seeds too if you want them on the top.


One long slash down the long axis of the bread.


Oven temp 230 degrees for 10 minutes with steam in the oven (little tray in bottom with boiling water in)  turned down to 220 once the loaf has sprung and started to go brown for 20 minutes and then 210 for the last 15/20 minutes.





 


 

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Zeb

I hope this is ok to do this as I can't find the posts I wanted to add these too as I am new here.  Yesterday I made these breads, a yeasted dough cottage loaf, following Elizabeth David's method (first time I have ever baked a loaf from a cold start!)  and the pain de sielge d'auvergne, I think its lineage goes as follows, Daniel Leader, LeadDog and Mick of Bethesdabakers, thank you all for this recipe -  and my usual Pain de Campagne.  


Anyway I wanted to share the photos with you. The rye burst at the side because I wasn't sure whether or not to slash the top, obviously I should have done.


Sun shining here in Bristol!  all the best Zeb (on the internet nobody knows you're a dog!)





Zeb's picture
Zeb

I hope this is ok to do this as I can't find the posts I wanted to add these too as I am new here.  Yesterday I made these breads, a yeasted dough cottage loaf, following Elizabeth David's method (first time I have ever baked a loaf from a cold start!)  and the pain de sielge d'auvergne, I think its lineage goes as follows, Daniel Leader, LeadDog and Mick of Bethesdabakers, thank you all for this recipe -  and my usual Pain de Campagne.  


 


Anyway I wanted to share the photos with you. The rye burst at the side because I wasn't sure whether or not to slash the top, obviously I should have done.


Sun shining here in Bristol!  all the best Zeb (on the internet nobody knows you're a dog!)





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