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occidental

I've been reading David's many posts on his blog about San Joaquin Sourdough, a formula he developed that was inspired by a long bulk ferment Janedo wrote about after a visit with Anis Bouabsa.  David had tried enough variations of this formula I had to do some reading before I settled on the approach I was going to take for my first attempt. 


 


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I started with a 65% hydration starter that I refereshed and let mature for approximately 6 hours.  It had definitely started to grow but had not reached the peak of it's activity when i proceeded to the next step.  I then incoorporated 100 grams of the 65% levain with:

  • 370 g water
  • 450 g bread flour
  • 10 g dark rye flour
  • 40 g whole wheat flour

I mixed and let autolyze for approximately 30 minutes.  I then added:

  • 1/4 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 10 g sea salt

I proceeded to fold this mixture 3 times in the bowl, for approximately 15 folds each time, spaced about 20 minutes apart.  I intended on 20 folds but the dough seemed to have enough, or maybe too much strength after 15 turns so I stopped when the dough told me to.

 

 

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After mixing and kneading (folding) I placed the dough in the fridge overnight.  Instead of keeping the dough in the fridge until just prior to shaping as David suggests I removed it and placed in a cool room (~55 degrees F) to encourage a little more growth.  I have found that placing the dough my fridge may retard it a bit too much and I desired a little growth before dividing and shaping.  The time in the fridge was about 15 hours, followed by about 5 hours in the cooler (50 degree) room.  I then divided the dough into 2 pieces and pre-shaped, and let sit for approximately 1 hour.  I then did the final shape and let sit again for approximately 45 minutes.  During the time in between shapings there is not much growth to the dough, you are expecting most of your rise once the loaf hits the oven.  I pre-heated my oven to 500 degrees F, about 1 hour prior to baking.  I scored the loaves I added some steam once I added the loaves.  About ten minutes into the bake I was pleased to look into the oven and see that the loaves were getting a nice oven spring and my score was going to result in a nice 'ear', which was pretty exciting since this doesn't happen just every day for me....so I had to get a pic:

 

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I baked the loaves about 40 minutes, reducing the temp from 500 to 460 once the loaves were in the oven.

 

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As for the crumb, it is very open, has great flecks of whole wheat and rye, although that is not very evident from these photos, and flavor is out of this world!

 

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As David has done, I envision experimenting around more with these methods and the ingredients, learning from them and creating my own favorite formula....

 

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By the way, this bread was a great compliment to the strawberry jalapeno glazed ribs that came off the grill not long after this bread cooled....

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occidental's picture
occidental

I recently baked Pain au Levain from Hammelman's book 'Bread..."  This is the second formula I've tried from this book, following two fairly sucessful attempts at Vermont Sourdough.  There are a few differences between the two.  Vermont SD starts with a liquid levain while PaL starts with a stiff levain.  Hammelman calls for whole rye in Vermont SD while calling for medium rye flour in PaL.  Also, a long final ferment is called for with Vermont SD while it is recommended not to go for the long ferment with PaL.  I didn't vary from the formula and had pretty satisfactory results.  I also had good results with a new brotform following a previous episode where the dough stuck and I ruined a couple loaves a week or so ago.  Here are a couple pics of the look of the loaf and the crumb:


 


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I've just run across the roasted garlic levain on page 183 and am thinking that is going to have to be one of the next attempts. Have any of you tried this formula?

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occidental

Hi all, I've been enjoying all your posts over the last week or so, it looks like many of you produced great breads for the holidays.  I did some baking over the holidays I need to catch up on blogging about.  I was away from home so in other words, away from the mixer, the baking stone, my arsenal of flours and the sourdough I am used to working with.  Add to that new brotforms I received for Christmas and you don't know what will happen.  Thankfully I have been reading up here at the fresh loaf and this gave me the opportunity to experiment with new methods and get out of my comfort zone.  My bakes included Vermont Sourdough, Susan's Simple Sourdough and Anis Bouabsa's baugettes.  Many of the things I tried came after reading ehanner's great post of eye opening techniques .  If you have not read that post I'd suggest you do.  You may develop a new technique or be led to many other great posts that challenge your routines.  I did all my mixing using stretch and folds and all my baking started with placing the loafs in a cold oven using the no preheat method.  I was pleased with most of the results.  The exception is that my overnight proof of the Vermont Sourdough stuck in the new brotform I received and getting it out deflated it such that it was nearly ruined.  The flavor was good but the crumb was pretty much non-existent.  Now that I'm home I've tried them again with rice flour with better results.  One bread I had not tried that I will be baking often is Susan's Simple Sourdough - just the right size for a household of 1 - thanks Susan!    Anyhow, Happy New Year to all.  A couple pictures follow...


Vermont Sourdough (not the loaf that stuck):


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Susans Simple Sourdough:

 

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occidental

Over the past weekend I thought I'd get into one of my books that I haven't baked from yet, "Bread" by Jeffrey Hammelman.  Being a sourdough fanatic I decided to start with a sourdough and selected the Vermont sourdough, which appears to be one of Hammelman's standbys.  I had great results with the formula and this bread may become one of my favorites if I can repeat the results.  I followed the formula fairly close, however following the mix the dough felt a bit on the dry side and I added about a tablespoon of water.  Once the dough had a chance to autolyse and I did two folds I decided I probably didn't need to add the water as the dough was really on the sticky side.  I let the formed loaves rise in a cool place to try and develop the flavor a bit and baked until I had a pretty dark crust.  I scored the loaves but they were pretty wet so it was almost a rustic looking loaf.  The oven spring was impressive and the crumb is very open.  It tastes great too!  I'll be making ths loaf again soon!


 


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occidental

Prompted by ehanners post and great looking loafs I baked Shiao Ping's Chocolate Sourdough earlier this week.  I followed the formula pretty close and was pleased with the results.  I went with 2 small and one larger boule.  Shiao Ping advises to bake them right from the fridge.  I did get better oven spring with the boule that I let warm for about an hour so I wondered if I should have done this with the others, or if I just should have let them rise a bit longer before I put them in the fridge to retard.  Anyhow, if you are looking for a great sweet bread for a holiday breakfast or other celebration you may want to consider this as an option!  A couple pics of the oven spring from the loaf I let warm and the crumb follow:


 


 


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occidental

I baked the buckwheat batard from Leader's Local Breads yesterday.  This is my third or fourth attempt at this bread, and by far the most sucessful.  The first time I tried this bread I was unaware of the errors in the formula (if you do a search of the site you will find posts on the errors of this book) and ended up experimenting just trying to get a buckwheat starter that I could work with.  The flavor is so unique that I did not give up and have come up with a formula that works for me.  For the buckwheat levain I used 75 grams of my liquid levain that is approximately 100% hydration.  To that I added 35 grams of water and 40 grams of buckwheat flour, which totals 150 grams, close to the 125 grams needed for the dough, with just a little to spare.  I let this sit and ferment overnight.  There was not much visible fermentation as far as rising or bubbles coming to the surface with this levain, however upon stirring it up it was evident from the texture that it was active.  I then followed the rest of the formula as written in the book, except that I made 3 loaves instead of the suggested 4.  I'm not a big butter fan however I really enjoy this bread warmed with a little butter on it, and the buckwheat flavor is very unique.  Now on to the pics... 


 


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occidental

Inspired by Txfarmer's post ( http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/14636/auvergne-rye-baguette-bacon ) last week I baked Leaders Auvergne Rye with Bacon today.  I didn't have the really open crumb txfarmer had but I'm pleased with the results.  These loaves were proofed in the fridge overnight which, if anything else developed a good 'skin' that made scoring easy.  I expected more of a bacon flavor - I'd say there is a hint of flavor but not much more - which is disapointing after adding seven slices of bacon!  I can't say this is one of my favorites from Local Breads but I may try it again some time.  On to the pictures...


 


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occidental's picture
occidental

I thought I'd post the resluts from yesterday's baking and see if I can figure out how to post pictures, so here goes.  This is the French bread from Ed Wood's "Classic Sourdoughs"  I don't use this book as much as others in the library but the timetable of the formula worked with my Friday / Saturday schedule.  The crust is nice and crispy and I did get some nice fractured crackles as soon as they came out of the oven.  Oven spring wasn't quite as good as I'd like and as usual, the biggest challenge for me is getting a good score.  Enjoy.


 


 


 


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occidental's picture
occidental

Hey folks.  I've been reading posts at this site for a very long time (years?) and finally decided to sign up.  It's certainly been a good resource for me to learn from and improve my baking.  I have had a few sourdough cultures for a while now and that is what I really enjoy baking with - it all just seems like a big science experiment that you get to enjoy eating when you are done with it!  I've recently relocated from the east side of Oregon to the west side and the rainy season is looking to be the bread baking season for me.  Thanks to all of you who I have enjoyed reading and learning from.  I'll look forward to posting some pictures of my breads as that is what I seem to enjoy more than anything else from others posts!


Ed

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