The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Mebake

Yesterday was a milestone in my Bread Baking quest. The seemingly defiant Wholewheat has been brought to its Knees, Well at least to me.


This was a 100% Whole Wheat Sourdough Boule i Baked yesterday. Constituted of 100% White Whole Wheat flour i milled, and baked under stainless steel bowl on a stone. It is very mildly sour, and very tender and creamy/ nutty somewhat moist crumb.


Credit and props go to:  thefreshloaf.com, and its members: David (dmsnyder), and ShiaoPing (ShiaoPing), for enlightening me on the stretch and fold method.


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


   


 Scoring did deflate part of the dough, as evident from the second slice.


Mebake


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Yesterday I baked this Boule... With 33% Rye this time. Success!


I have had the best oven spring because of using an improvised cloche. A ceramic clay oven pot i bought off a store, and replaced the cover (which was vented) with a stanless steel bowl on top, and preheated both to 250 C.


Now i know how baking accomplishment feels.


Hats off to Susan't magic bowl idea, and Eric..at that.


              




 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

A failed endeavour this time, when i hoplessly tried to braid a wholewheat challah as per Peter Reinhart's Wholegrain book, and ended up fusing the braids into a lump of dough and making a boule instead! I may have to reduce the hydration in the challah next time, and the braids may well hold shape.


Anyway, into the Boules i ventured, and this is how i made it:


(All directions are in accordance with P.R Wholgrain breads)


1- Day (1):


- Warm water 1.25 cups + Yeast 1 tsp (not recom. by P.R)+ fine wholegrain flour 3.1 cups


- Mixed by hand, Autolyzed for 10 min, shaped into a ball and set into an oiled bowl, covered with plas. wrap.(BIGA)


- Same ingredients as above but with salt (1 tablespoon) instead of yeast. (SOAKER), shaped and covered with a plastic wrap.


- First (BIGA) goes to fridge or a really cool place, for at least 4 hours and maximum 3 days.


- Second (SOAKER) goes anywhere you want except v. cold or v. warm. for 24 hrs. More than that it has to go to fridge.


 


2- Day(2):


- First Dough (BIGA) is to be removed from the fridge 2 hrs prior to mixing into dough 2.


- After 2 hrs, cut BIGA, and cut SOAKER into small pieces flouring them as you do so that they won't stick to each other. Mix pieces into a large bowl interchangeably, then add honey (2 tbl)/ Butter/ oil whatever you may savour, and mix vigorously.


- allow the final dough to rest for 1/2 hour.


- Cover with a plastic bag, and allow to ferment until 1 1/2 - double.


-after 45 min or so, scrap the dough into a floured/ oiled/ watered space, and shape into a boule, degazzing as little as possible.


- put the boule into a basket mold/ banetton/ brotform/ to hold shape while fermenting the final time. Meanwhile preheat your oven.


- When boule has risen in 20 minutes to 1.5 its size, put it in the oven on a stone/ cookie tray.. and pur hot water into a hot skillet to generate steam.


- and you all know the rest.. 


I swear, the taste of this bread is far far superior than the storebought... no comparison, i could it this all day!!


Boule 1 (well a hybrid batard/boule) Just out of the oven:


Boule 2: baked in a thick iron skillet:




and ofcourse, the crumb of boule 1


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Mebake

I came back from vacation!


I made this Barley batard (1/3 barley , 2/3 Whole Wheat), hearth bread.


Al though i used volume measurements, it turned our more or less sufficient. here it goes:


1 cup naked barley flour (1/3)


2 Cups Whole Wheat flour (2/3)


1 table spoon salt


1/4 teaspoon yeast


1.85 Cup of water, so roughly the final dough is 62% hydration (i could not elevate the hydration further because of the barley flour which kind of hinders the shaping process).


I used peter reinhart's method of delayed fermentation: i.e. split the doughs of each flower into halves, one contains yeast and goes to the fridge for 24hrs, while the other contains salt and remains outside in a warm place for 24hrs.


24hrs later, i combine the Biga (yeasted one) with the soaker (salted one), and make the bulk dough , and leave it to ferment for 1.5 hours until roughly 1.5 X the size.


Then, i scrape the fermented dough into a workspace WITHOUT de-flating it, and formed a Batard. At this point i heated the oven to 500 F, or 260 C while the bartard is left to ferment the final fermentation.


Half an hour later I used lava rocks in a Teflon cake mold and pured hot water to creat steam, and put the batard onto a parchment paper, and into the oven. the batard streched sideways, but oven rise compensated!


50 minutes later : VOILA!        VERY TASTEY


The loaf



Crumb



Mebake's picture
Mebake

I delayed this bread long enough, i thought to myself. It was, afterall, the inspiration behind baking craziness. The bread is 1/3 Barley and 2/3 Wholewheat.


Taste? mmm.. it was sourdough, though some 1.6 tsp of yeast was used in the final dough. The bread tastes: Wholesome- Soury- Fibery- damp- chewy - Crusty. Thats is the way i felt when i took a bite. Regrets? Would skip the  Wholewheat starter and go for a yeast poolish to somewhat reduce sourness, though the bread was mildly sour.


Ingredients:


150 g Whole Barley flour


300 g Whole Wheat Flour


80 g Ripe Stiff Wholewheat starter


1 tsp sea salt


2 tsp Active dry inst. yeast


1 tsp molasses


265 g water


**************************************


As instructed by Peter Reinhart's Wholegrain breads, i made a biga and a soaker.


Soaker: 150g WholeWheat flour + 75g Whole Barley Flour + all Salt + 130g water


Biga: 150g Wholewheat Flour + 75g Wholebarley flour + all starter + 130 g water


I let them sit for 1 hour, then i refrigerate them for 24 hours.


Next day, i removed the two doughs, biga and soker from the fridge and let them sit for 2 hours to warm. Next, i mixed the two doughs thoroughly , added all the yeast and 5 grams water, and knead  until both incorporated evenly (the final dough.)


I oiled a bowl and put the final dough in for bulk fermentation. This took 1.5 hours. I carefully scraped the dough into a floured workspace, and began shaping the dough into a Boule. Initial shaping was followed by final shaping, and into the proofing basket upside down it went. I preheated the oven to 450 F or 240 C with an empty load paf for steaming and a cast-iron skillet as a baking stone.


1 hour later I removed the Hot cast iron skillet, and inverted the dough from the basket to a parchment and unto the skillet. Into the oven it went and i poured hot water into the hot loaf pan to creat steam and closed the oven.


1 hour later, i turned the oven off, i opened the oven door for 10 minutes with the bread in for extra crust, and then removed it unto a cooling rack.


The Boule in the oven after 8 minutes



Sourdough Barley Bread


 


A crumb Shot



Another Crumb shot



Mebake

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Mebake

Ever since he left germany, my father has always been a fan of german sourdough ryes, aren't we all?


The store bought Seeded Sourdough rye my father often buys is so called (nordic or norlander bread). I thought that i could mimic the taste and appearance of the said bread, i tried twice and failed.


Venturing into starter world and sourdoughs helped develop my baking skills, and Rye baking was especially successful. Credit goes to God almighty and freshloavers.


 Yesterday, 16 days into mixing water, Rye flour and perparing a starter, my most successful rye loaf was born. It is inspired from "Norlander bread" which in turn is inspired from sourdough seeded german rye breads, and its my german-variation Rye bread


The loaf was 70% wet, and contained: 100% wet Sourdough Rye starter, sea salt, pre-soked whole rye berries, fennel seeds, caraways seeds, aniseed, rye flour, and mixture of presoaked  seeds.


bulk proofing took 6 hours, and final shaping proofing was 65 minutes. (obviously the crust caved in in oven, indicating an overproof)


The taste? although i should wait for the recommended 24 hours to slice the loaf, i could not wait (Typically human!), and it was heavenly tastefull with a pleasent sour rye taste and delicious seeds.


Pictures follow:


Fresh Loaf out of the oven


 


A cross section


 


A Close look



 


I will sure duplicate this experience in the near future.


Mebake

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I made this loaf one month back. It was very pleasing to toast, very. i'd recommend all who live in Dubai to try that!


Typical Ingredients:


Whole wheat (coarse bran) Flour, Instant Dry Yeast, a wholewheat preferment, warm water, honey/brown sugar/molasses, sea Salt, whole milk powder, some butter.


 



Sliced!



 


and toasted with kashkaval cheese


Mebake's picture
Mebake

Yesterday, I decided to venture into batards. I shaped one, and a loaf. Both were Sourdoughs with a 24 hr old liquid preferment. The final dough undergone its first proofing in a refreigerator for 24 hours (i was out). Yesterday, i deflated the cold proofed dough, and knead it until it became somewhat warm.


I left the dough to rise for 3-4 hours, and cut it into equal halves. I shaped one as a batard. and the other into a loaf.


However, this time i had bought an oven thermometer! When i preheated the oven, i was striked by the misconception i had about my oven temperature. It turned out that i often baked at lower temperature than recommended for Home-made artisan breads, i.e. 425 - 470F.


Therefore, i swung the dial into no.7 or 400F and waited. The breads cooked well, crackled when done, and had an eye pleasing golden finish to them.


THAT IS WHAT I WANTED and have missed all along in my previous loaves. THANK GOD.


The crust is the best i have ever achieved so far.


Next target... 70% Rye bread adventure.. be on the lookout. :P


Mebake

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Being a new member in this cool informative site, i would like to share my newest attempt to bake a Mild Rye loaf (50% AP). Pictures attached will do the talking. However, the crumb was gilatinous and rubbery, beacuse the dough was very hydrated. The end result, had a bland taste rubbery crumb, though airy and somewhat spongy. I'll reduce hydration next time.


I don't have any vital gluten, so i kneaded the dough in runnung water to get rid of some starch.


Iam learning as i go..


 

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