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inlovewbread


Just sharing a picture of the things I baked today. I'm pleased with the way everything came out- the sourdoughs on the left went a little too long, but they're not burnt. I made 2 sourdough batards (SJ sourdough), two loaves of whole wheat multigrain sandwich bread, poppy seed-millet sourdough batards and two batches of KA Onion buns. My freezer is now well-stocked for company. :-)


Have a good weekend everyone!

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inlovewbread


I made up another batch of dmsnyder's San Joaquin Sourdough and this is my bake. They are still singing as I type this! I got a better ear this time- I think it was a better scoring, I cut a little deeper than the last try. Also, I used the full 21 hour cold fermentation for this bake as apposed to the 14 hours on the last attempt. I don't know if this has anything to do with the better ear or not.


My question though is (I guess directed at David, but others please chime in): 


Can I apply this same method (fold in the bowl bulk ferment at room temp, overnight/ long cold retardation/ room temp 1 hr. 45 min/ bake) to other types of sourdough? 


I love the way that this formula and method fit into my schedule, and the cold dough is so easy to handle. It seems like a 'reliable' method. I would like to try this approach to other formulas using my sourdough starter, specifically Glezer's "Essential's Columbia", but don't know if this long fermentation would work with the malt syrup included in the formula


David- have you tried your method with any other formulas or have you modified your SJ formula ever including malt syrup? Seeded? With durum flour? Other? What were the results?


Thank you in advance for taking the time on this question. And thanks again for a fabulous formula! These batards and another batch tonight will be for company this week! :-)

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inlovewbread

My last few bakes haven't been so successful. Formulae that usually turned out well were coming out of the oven looking sad. I can't figure out if I was over or under-proofing. I kept trying at it to get the timing right on Glezer's Colombia. Incidentally I posted about it on my blog because it's the family's favorite bread, but lately the scoring just doesn't open up. The flavor is great, but I can't get it to look the way I want it to anymore! Ugh! Then I made a few other breads that just turned out so-so. How is it that my bread could be getting worse?


But alas, a little baking redemption:



Today's bake was dmsnyder's San Joaquin Sourdough (finally tried it) and my favorite Pain au Levain with whole wheat. 


The San Joaquin Sourdough- or "Idaho Sourdough" as I guess it should be called:




I took a risk and did not stick to the 21 hour cold bulk ferment as specified in dmsnyder's formula. I pulled out the dough for final proofing at about 14 hours. It looks like it woke up fine! The grigne looks a little jagged, I confidently scored these batards but I may not have gone deep enough. It turned out a pretty interesting look though.


The crumb:




Outstanding flavor, a little more sour than I have been getting- which is good!


The Pain au Levains:



It's good to see a grigne...



the crumb:



I really don't like doing math- so here is the *formula* for the Pain au Levain with whole wheat, and a little rye:


75% white flour (I used like 75% ap and 25% bread flour)


15% white whole wheat flour (WM Prairie Gold, freshly ground)


10% rye flour (whole rye)


40% of the flour was prefermented 


2% salt (I used french grey salt, and I think it really makes a difference)


roughly 70% hydration


 

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inlovewbread


Pain au Levain a la Vanille ( sourdough bread with vanilla )


I recently was gifted some beautiful organic vanilla beans. They have been calling to me from my pantry for a few weeks now. I wanted to incorporate them into some sort of bread but couldn't think of something that would pair well with the vanilla bean and still be good in a bread. I decided to let the smell and taste of vanilla to shine through and just use it on its own. 


I found it most interesting that vanilla beans come from a type of orchid. The vanilla pod is the fruit. Vanilla beans are the second most expensive spice behind saffron; mostly because of what the cultivation entails. For centuries, only a certain type of bee was able to pollinate the vanilla orchid and the vanilla beans could not be grown outside of Mexico and parts of Central America. Until in 1841, a 12-year old french-owned slave developed a method of hand pollination with a bamboo stick. Vanilla was then able to be grown commercially. Although, the process is still painstaking as the vanilla flower only remains open for one day, the vines of the orchid must be inspected daily and the flower pollinated immediately. Harvesting the vanilla pods is labor intensive as well. After reading such a history, I was so appreciative of these beautiful "fruits" to use in my bread. 


  


The most wonderful smell was emanating from my oven as these loaves baked. 


The taste is very nice. Almost like cake batter but without the sweetness. The vanilla flavor was complimented by the subtle acidity of the french-style sourdough I keep. All-Purpose flour was a good choice with this bread because of the "fluffiness" it lent to the crumb- more of that cake-like quality :-)


This would make a great Valentine's Day bread. I served a slice of it today with fresh strawberries :-) 




Formula:


Levain Build:


45 g Firm Starter


95 g King Arthur Organic All-Purpose Flour


5 g Whole White Wheat 


50 g Water


 


Final Dough:


350 g KA Organic All-Purpose Flour


125 g White Whole Wheat Flour (I used Prairie Gold from Wheat Montana, freshly ground)


25 g Rye Flour (I used finely ground whole rye)


350 g Water (I used warm water for a desired dough temp. of 76F)


All of Levain Build


10 g salt


Contents of two long vanilla bean pods


 


Method:


Elaborate your starter the night before you plan to bake. Leave at room temperature for 8-12 hours.


The next day, mix flours and water. Rest for 30 minutes, covered. 


Add levain in pieces on top of dough and sprinkle on the salt. Mix until incorporated and then add scrapings from two vanilla bean pods. 


Knead for about 8 minutes or until medium gluten development is achieved. 


Ferment at room temp for I hour, then fold.


Continue fermenting for 2-3 more hours. (Mine took 2 1/2 hours at 71 degrees F)


Divide and shape into two batards. 


Ferment en couche (or on flour dusted parchment which is what I did) for 1 to 1 1/2 hours. (mine took 1 hour).


Pre-heat oven to 475F with steam pan in place.


Score as desired and load onto baking stone and bake with steam*. Immediately turn down oven to 450F. Remove source of steam and turn down oven to 400F after 15 minutes of baking. Bake 20-25 minutes more. I left my loaves in a turned-off oven w/ the door cracked for an additional 5 minutes.


*Steam by your method of choice. I used a loaf pan with river rocks in it, and poured 1/2 cup water on top.


Cool completely. Or, cut into one a bit warm if you want to! Warm and vanilla go very well together.



 


This post is being submitted to Susan at Wild Yeast Blog for YeastSpotting. Be sure to check it out for an amazing array of beautiful breads!


 



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inlovewbread

This bread is from Maggie Glezer's gem of a book: Artisan Baking. I have been wanting to make this bread for a while because it was named after the Columbia River. As a Washington State native, I had to make it. I'm glad I did as this bread has become my new personal favorite. 


Formula:


Bread Flour 45%, All-Purpose Flour 45%, Whole Wheat Flour 8%, Whole Rye Flour 2%, Toasted Wheat Germ 3%, Barley malt syrup 3%, Water 67%, Levain 41%*, Salt 2%* (*Glezer's formula specifies 41% but by my calculations it was more like 46%. I used 30g 50% hydration firm white starter to innoculate 150g bread flour at 63% hydration (63g water). *I decreased the salt from 2.4% to 2% overall.


I made a small change to the original recipe in method. Instead of mixing for 10 minutes (!) which I thought was a bit much, I mixed to shaggy mass then let rest (autolyse) for about 50 (instead of 20) minutes before adding the salt and levain. I then did two stretch and folds for the first two 45-minute intervals of the 5 hour bulk ferment. The dough was then divided, shaped and proofed for 4 more hours. I also changed the baking from what was recommended in the book. I baked at 500 degrees F for the first 5 minutes with steam, then turned the oven down to 460F, then 425F for the last 10 minutes, for a total of 34 minutes baking time.


This is the best ear/ bloom that I have ever gotten on a loaf. It was really fun to watch it open up in the oven. 



We like the toasted wheat germ that was added to this bread. It adds a lot of nuttiness and depth of flavor along with a small amount of rye and white whole wheat. Some others on TFL have tried it with spelt with good results. I might try that. The picture above shows one that I slashed twice, and the other tried to follow the "grapevine pattern" instructions described in the book. THere is only one small off-to-the-side picture of the actual bread, so I wasn't quite sure what Glezer meant. My attempt wasn't pretty- too many scores. The below picture is of some sort of shape I made-up today to avoid a disaster. I tried shaping these batards differently than I usually do (actually, I tried GR's technique shown here) and the batard ended up too long for my baking stone. (Not to discount this shaping method, just my learning curve error to blame) So I made a coronne/ ciabatta shape to fit. Worked pretty well, and I kind of like the look :-)



Wonderful flavor and texture, I love this bread.

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inlovewbread

This is Potato Leek bread from SteveB's "Bread cetera" blog. His breads are amazing, and this one is no exception. The potato and leek go so well together. I used Yukon Gold potatoes instead of the red potatoes called for in the formula. I've made it both ways though and both are good (I think). The only other change I made was to use my firm starter in lieu of the 100% hydration starter. 


This is my first try at the "fendu" shape. This shape is traditional for potato breads but I don't see it around much. I don't think I got it tight enough before going into the brotform, it kind of exploded. Oh well, I like the shape, and it's nice to not have to score sometimes. 



here's the crumb from the other (small) loaf that was made with this batch of dough:



This one's a winner, and if you like leeks you should try them in this bread :-)


 

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inlovewbread

The first rye that I made can be found here. It was a 80% Rye with a Rye Flour Soaker from Hamelman's Bread. I have to add to my previous post, that the flavor developed over the next few days and the crust softened up. I liked the bread a lot and it was good with just a little butter on it :-) At first I wasn't that impressed but as time went on I came to really like it. I saved the last third or so of the loaf for use as altus. 


The next rye I tried was a 70% Rye. The formula for this loaf can be found here. It is Hansjoakim's favorite rye using dmsnyder's write-up. (thanks for the clear instructions!) 



I really liked this rye! The taste was really good- hard to describe, but better than my last rye. I think this was partly due to the fact that I had used Hodgson Mills whole rye flour with the first loaf (which is course ground) and with this loaf here I used an organic medium whole rye flour from PCC. The texture was dense but moist and the crust was perfect- not too hard. I was happy to get this "cracked" pattern on the bread from placing the dough seam side down in the brotform. I love how it looks- Hansjoakim's turn out way better of course.


Overall, I like this bread. I think I may use it as a base in the future for a bread with caraway seeds, anise and something else in it- cardamom maybe. 


Third Rye:



This is a Jewish Deli Rye using (again) dmsnyder's write-up which can be found here. I didn't know if I like caraway seeds or not, turns out....I do! This bread is really good and would make a great sandwich. Very flavorful.


I used First Clear Flour for the first time with these loaves, and again used the organic PCC medium rye flour. I built-up my rye starter over the preceding three days to make this loaf which calls for 750 grams rye sour. I'd like to try this bread again with a WHITE rye sour instead of the whole rye starter/sour that I used. I think it would have been lighter in color and more authentic? tasting. I don't know- I have nothing to go off of since I have not had rye breads before except the ones that I have made!


It is important to me to try different breads, and rye bread in particular. I appreciate history and learning of different people groups, their culture and heritage, and making these rye breads is a tiny way to be better connected to them. Every country in the world has their own breads, and I find it interesting and poignant to eat the same types of flavors they did/do, and learn the "why" behind the ingredients they use. Fascinating to me.


So, I'm going to keep on with rye for a while. I was going to move on to the Detmolder Rye's but I think I may wait until I can fashion a proofing box for that (you have to keep certain temperatures for each sour build). Next rye? I'll take suggestions. Maybe "Eric's Favorite Rye" or a swedish rye...we'll see.


 

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inlovewbread


Inspired by Farine's beautiful Sweet Potato Bread, I made a few adjustments and am calling this bread, "Warm Comfort Bread."


I made this a couple weeks ago when it was 1 degree outside. Yes, 1. Super cold and snowy. Perfect weather for this bread with a hint of cumin and the taste of sweet potato. I'm normally not a huge fan of cumin, and so when I saw this as an ingredient I considered omitting it altogether. Instead, I decreased the amount to 1 gram. I was glad I included it because it gave the bread such a great taste- something you can't quite identify, but warm. Yeah, it sounds funny, but the bread actually "tasted" and felt warm- not temperature wise, but in the combination of flavors and I think the cumin contributes a lot to that. And it's surprising how just one gram can compliment the flavor of the sweet potato so nicely. 


My formula for this bread: (modified from Farine's original Sweet Potato Bread recipe)


230g 100% hydration starter 


*you could use your white starter here, I used a 50% white/rye starter and liked the little bit of rye flavor it added. If you don't have a rye starter you may want to add a little rye flour along with your white and whole wheat flours for added flavor.


510g unbleached ap flour


200g whole wheat flour (I used a combination of freshly-milled white and red wheats)


350g cold water (or use all or part cooled sweet potato water depending on how much you have left from boiling the potato)


280g sweet potato puree


35g wheat germ


1 to 1.5g ground cumin


16g sea salt* (original recipe is for 18g, but I chose to decrease the salt)


*be sure to decrease the % of salt if you are using salted sweet potatoes left over from dinner 


Method:


1. Bake or boil sweet potatoes, mash, cool and set aside. Save sweet potato water (if desired) for use as all or part of the water.


2. Mix everything but salt in the bowl of a mixer on first speed until all ingredients are incorporated. Cover and rest 10 minutes. Add salt, then mix until medium gluten development- another 5 minutes or so.


3. Remove dough from bowl, knead it for a minute by hand and then place it in an oiled, covered container. 


4. Ferment at room temp for one hour, fold dough and put back in container.


5. Place container in the fridge and retard overnight.


The next day:


1. Turn out dough and divide into three pieces (or into 2 as I did). Preshape into boules or batards. Rest 15 minutes.


2. Shape into tight boules or batards, place int brotforms and retard in the refrigerator again for 6- 10 hours.


3. Preheat oven to 500f. Pull out loaves from the fridge and set on counter while oven preheats.


4. Load breads in the oven with steam (I left the steam pan in for 7 minutes then removed)


5. Reduce oven temp to 450 and bake for 35 minutes. I then left the loaves in the turned-off oven for 5 minutes with the door open.


6. Cool completely. 


I enjoyed this bread with a cup of coffee, looking out the window and watching it snow. In front of a fireplace would be good too :-)



 


 


 

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inlovewbread

I've been baking my way through Hamelman's "Bread". Sometimes I don't always go in order- and right now, I'm stuck on the Sourdough Rye section. I decided to go with the "80% Rye with a Rye-Flour Soaker" (page 213) instead of starting with the first (40%) rye of the chapter. I deviated from the formula a bit as I baked a single pullman loaf instead of the 2 free-form loaves specified. I'm not afraid to shape rye- actually, I'm looking forward to seeing what it's like...but I do like the look of a pullman loaf. Same way I'm attracted to Volvo's, Frank Lloyd Wright architecture and cubism. Seems strong to me, nice lines, and perfect with a strong flavor like rye. If I bake all my future loaves in the pullman pan though, my posts would get very (or even more)boring.... However, my pullman pan was my Christmas gift and I intend to put it to good use :-)


I think this formula was a good starting point. I was going for experience with this loaf, but also to gain a sort of base-line. I want to eventually get to a high-percentage rye that is sweet (with the sweetness coming from the rye itself), very moist, dense and chewy. I'd also like it to include rye chops, cracked rye or whole rye berries as in Vollkornbrot- but I haven't found a good source for any of these yet. I do have Triticale- which genetically is 1/2 Rye. I was thinking of using this in place of rye berries or chopped rye. Not sure- anyone else tried it?


To confess, I have not had rye before. But the pictures in Hamelman's "Bread" of rye loaves were enough to draw me in.


I was pleased with the flavor and crumb of the bread, but not the crust. It was too hard and had to be cut off. Luckily that was easy because of the square shape! Maybe because I baked in in the pullman- the baking times could have been off, and like I said, this was my first try at rye. Crust aside though- this bread was nice.


Moving forward in the chapter, I'd like to try the 3-Stage Detmolder method- to satisfy my sourdough science nerd side I suppose. Sourdough cultures fascinate me, and I'd like to try this method and see what each stage is like. If you are not familiar with this method- basically it's building up your rye sour 3 times to bring about different aspects of the rye sourdough flavor by favoring each cultures preferred growth conditions. Really fun stuff. 


So here's my first rye loaf, waiting- waiting and waiting- wrapped in linen for the full 24 hours before being cut into:



And here's the loaf:



Not the best picture, I know. The holes are from "docking" the loaf as per a recommendation on another TFL thread about rye. I can't remember which one, I've read most, if not all of them recently. I wanted to avoid a hole in the crumb so I docked it. I don't know if it was necessary or not.


I'm looking for any and all comments on rye here. Any suggestions, favorite ryes, good rye for a pullman pan? Anything anyone has to say on the subject appreciated. 


Happy Baking

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inlovewbread


I'm calling this "Mixed Flour" because I used a lot of different flours. I wanted to see if I could get the characteristics I wanted in the crumb by adjusting just the flours. It seemed to have worked, so here's what I used:


Again (It's a family/personal favorite :-)), I was following Susan's Simple Sourdough formula. Only hers doesn't call for so many flours!


50g Firm Starter (mine is 50% hydration composed of 10% rye and 90% AP)


205g Water


100g AP Flour (I used Wheat Montana)


100g Bread Flour (KA Bread Flour)


25g Durum Flour (also King Arthur)


25g Hard Red Whole Wheat (home-milled wheat berries)


50g Hard White Whole Wheat (home-milled wheat berries)


6g Salt (I used Hawaiian Sea Salt)


Method: Mix all by hand, rest 30 min. S+F three times at hour intervals. Let rise until double. Pre-shape, rest 15 min, shape. Into brotform and retard overnight. Out of fridge 2 hours, score and bake @450 covered for 20 min., uncovered for 20 more and 5 min in shut-off oven w/ door open.


Whew- that's quite the mishmash of flour, I know, but it tasted really good. I used the whole wheat because I want to start transitioning everything over to 100% whole wheat, but have to do it gradually. I also have tons of wheat berries that I need to use instead of buying more flour from the store! Not to mention the extra nutrition.


The reason I used the Durum is because I like the buttery flavor it lends to the bread and it seems to balance out the whole wheat flavor when added with freshly ground whole wheat. I've tried this in a couple of other things and it seems to neutralize that "earthy" flavor or any "bitter" tones from the hard red I suppose. 


And as for the 50/50 of AP and Bread flour- I like a mix of the really chewy/shiny crumb (from the BF) and a bit of "fluffyness" from the AP. The crumb: creamy/ buttery/ wheaty. 



 


 


 


 


 


 

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