The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

eva_stockholm's blog

  • Pin It
eva_stockholm's picture
eva_stockholm

Finally a good blueberry year in the Swedish mountains! After three or four very poor berry years, the woods and the lower mountain slopes are carpeted with luscious, ripe blueberries- some of them the size of grapes. The taste is intense, heightened by slow ripening during the long days and short nights of the the sub-arctic summer. (I am a bit too far south for proper midnight sun, but close enough).

Having stacked the freezer with enough jam to last us for the winter as well as for another stretch of poor berry years, I wanted to use some fresh berries in a bread.

I apologize for not presenting a proper recipe, as I never weigh or measure anything, but the method was something like this:

Please note that all measurements are more or less guesses on my part.

Primary Dough

About 1 cup of mature rye starter

3-4 generous handfuls of fresh blueberries

enough bread flour (wheat) to make a fairly sloppy dough

mix well, cover and let sit for a couple of hours

 

Final Dough

Add the following to the primary dough:

1 tbsp salt

1 tbsp honey

25 grams fresh yeast dissolved in about 1 cup plain youghurt

1 egg

bread flour until dough is firm enough to knead on the counter

knead well

incorporate 1-2 tbsp of butter at room temperature into the dough

knead well, return to bowl, cover and let rise until appr. doubled in size

(I did 2 "stretch-and-folds" during the process)

Baking

On an oiled cooking sheet, form a boule.

Pre-heat oven to 250 C (482 F)

Bake at that temperature for 30 minutes, turn heat down to 175 C (347 F) and bake for another 25 minutes. Turn off oven and leave bread inside while the oven is cooling.

Do not cut into bread until fully cooled.

 

 

 

eva_stockholm's picture
eva_stockholm

Bakers share recipes on knead-to-know basis.

eva_stockholm's picture
eva_stockholm

  


Here are two recipes for typical, traditional Swedish breads- "Limpa" and "Honokaka" Both breads are on the sweet side (As opposed to crispbread - "knackebrod"- Swedish soft bread traditions are not altogether "healthy" - poor fibre content and often too much sugar for modern tastes). All the same, these breads make a great occasional treat, and they go very nicely with savoury toppings and sandwich fillings. Try the "Honokaka" with smoked salmon or fresh shrimps or "Limpa" with thin slices of spicy sausage or smoked ham.


 I have adjusted the traditional recipes a bit:


The original recipes call for melted butter and lukewarm liquid. I personally prefer cold liquid (=long rising times) and not melting the fat before it is worked into the dough (=better crumb texture).


 Measurements are all metric.


 The pictures are not my own, alas!


LIMPA (2 loaves)


Limpa


 


50 g yeast


50 g butter at room temperature


1 deciliter water


4 deciliters full-fat milk


1 deciliter molasses, treacle or golden syrup


2 teasp salt


4 teasp ground anis and fennikel seeds


16 deciliters sifted rye flour + some more for shaping


 


Syrup Wash: a little syrup dissolved in water or strong coffee


 


Dissolve the yeast in the milk. Add salt,syrup and spices. Gradually work in the flour, stirring at first and kneading when the dough becomes thick enough to handle. When you are satisifed with the texture, work in the soft (not melted!) butter, shape dough into a ball, cover and leave to rise until double size.


 


Shaping: Divide the dough into 2 pieces. Shape each piece into an oblong loaf. Place loaves on greased cooking sheet, cover and leave to rise for another 30 minutes. Brush with syrup wash.


Bake at 200 degrees Celsius for about 30 minutes or until a knock on the underside produces a hollow sound.


Brush again with syrup wash. Let cool under a cloth to keep the crust soft.


Do not cut until reasonably cool.


 


 


HONOKAKA (12 large pieces)


Honokaka 


 


50 g yeast


50 g butter at room temperature


1 liter full-fat milk


1/2 deciliter molasses, treacle or golden syrup


1 tbsp salt


8 deciliter sifted rye flour


18 deciliters plain white wheat flour


 


Dissolve the yeast in the milk. Add salt and syrup. Add all the sifted rye flour and stir. Gradually work in most of the white flour, stirring at first and kneading when the dough becomes thick enough to handle. Save some of the wheat flour for final shaping. When you are satisifed with the texture, work in the soft (not melted!) butter, shape dough into a ball, cover and leave to rise until double size.


 


Shaping: Divide the dough into 12 pieces. Shape each piece into a ball, cover and leave to rise for another 20 minutes.


With a rolling pin, roll each piece into a flat round directly onto warm, greased cooking sheets - one round only on the same sheet. Perforate rounds all over the surface with a fork to prevent bubbling. Bake at 275 degrees Celsius for 3-4 minutes or until surface begins to turn golden.


Let the rounds cool stacked on top of each other under a cloth to keep them soft.


 


Cut into wedges when serving.


 


 


 

eva_stockholm's picture
eva_stockholm

Hi,


I just wanted to share a successful (provided you are VERY fond of bananas) experiment: the "bananas only" bread.


This is not a proper recipe, but more of a method.


Take any wholewheat or dinkel rolls recipe (if you are using a sourdough process, follow standard procedures until you reach the "baking day" or "final dough" stage). Then substitute ALL liquid in the recipe with equal volume of mashed, ripe bananas. Omit any sweeteners or fats included in the recipe - the bananas are moist and sweet enough - but do include salt.


Bake according to recipe.


For variation, try one or several of the following additions:


ground cinnamon, ground cardamom, nuts, seeds, raisins, apricots


Some suggestions for toppings when enjoying these rolls are:


simply good quality butter


peanut butter


Turkish youghurt


cream cheese


blue cheese


Enjoy!


 

Subscribe to RSS - eva_stockholm's blog