The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

dabrownman's blog

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We have been working our way up the whole multigrain SD ladder for some tike starting at 12% and now this one is 50%.  50% is the minimum whole grain we would like to eat as our daily bread for all kinds of personal health reasons. Plus it tastes so much better than white bread in Lucy’s book as well as mine.

 

Normally this breads would have all kinds of seeds, soakers, scalds, nuts, sprouts and fruits as add ins but the size of the holes in the crumb suffers as a result.  So this time we cut out all the bits inside and went with flour all by itself except for a bit of honey to cut the bitterness and some VW to get the low protein AP flour up to bread flour levels and help with the low gluten whole grains.

 

We hoped the holes would remain decent in size along with the SD tang, great multigrain taste and soft, moist crumb – with no Tang Zhong required.  We decided to up the hydration substantially for this bread to help keep the holes on the larger size while realizing that this might make for some serious ‘bread spread’.

 

The levain was made with all whole grains using a 66% hydration multigrain seed that had been in the fridge for 3 weeks.  It was built over 3 stages before being refrigerated for 24 hours to bring out the sour. 

 

We autolysed everything but the salt for 30 minutes and put the salt on top of the dough ball so it wouldn’t be forgotten.  We did 3 sets slap and folds of 6, 2 and 1 minute before doing 4 sets of s& F’s on 30 minute intervals.  We then immediately refrigerated the dough in bulk for 8 hours.

 

The next morning we took the dough out of the cold and put it on a heating pad for 1 1/2 hours to warm up before being shaped an placed into a rice floured basket.  After 2 hours we got Big Old Betsy ready  with a 550 F preheat and we refrigerated the dough again as the oven heated to try to get the skin cold enough to slash – it was pretty wobbly and close to 95% proofed.

 

Yes iit is a Mexican Winter Squash Pie - makes pumpkin so passe:-)

As we thought, the dough refused to be slashed and partially collapsed under the single edge razor but we slid it onto the bottom stone with high hopes that it would recover under the mega steam supplied by lava rocks in a 9x13 Pyrex pan half full of water.

 

And an Exploding Lemon Chocolate Cheesecake Souffle!

  We turned the oven down 25 degrees on 2 minute intervals until we got to 475 F and left it there for 6 minutes giving the dough a 12 minute steam bath.  The steam came out and we turned the oven down to 425 F convection this time, for another 10 minutes when the boule read 208 F on the inside and deemed done.  We did rotate the bread 180 degrees after 5 of those minutes.

 

This bread made a great balogna sandwich for lunch and then a fine chicken, grilled cheese the next day - with the usual veggie and fruit variety.

The bread browned nicely with small blisters, sprang back nicely and blooms a bit.  What it did best is spread.  This was ‘one wet dough’, no amount of cold could get it to keep from oozing once unchained from the basket.   Still, the crumb as open for 50% while grain bread and we were pleased but not as open as the 30% whole grain version – no surprise there.  We like this bread a lot.  It was very soft and moist on the inside with a chewy soft crust as it cooled.

 

Lucy never forgets a good salad for lunch and dinner.

Has to be one the best SFSD style bread we have managed and it tastes about as good as it this kind of bread gets.  I can see some bruschetta in our near future to go with some Italian gravy on Sunday.

Formula

 

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

20

0

0

20

3.65%

Whole Spelt

6

6

6

18

3.28%

Whole Kamut

6

6

6

18

3.28%

Whole Farro

6

6

6

18

3.28%

Whole Wheat

12

12

12

36

6.57%

Whole Rye

6

6

6

18

3.28%

Water

36

36

36

108

19.71%

Total

92

72

72

236

43.07%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multi-grain Mix

118

21.53%

 

 

 

Water

118

21.53%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.81%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

274

50.00%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

52

9.49%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

26

4.74%

 

 

 

Whole Kamut

26

4.74%

 

 

 

Dark Rye

26

4.74%

 

 

 

Whole Farro

26

4.74%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

430

78.47%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

2.01%

 

 

 

Water

375

68.43%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

87.21%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

548

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

493

89.96%

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

89.43%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

50.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,082

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Honey

15

2.74%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

15

2.74%

 

 

 

Total

30

5.47%

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We have been working our way up to higher and higher percent whole grains using sourdough and trying to get an open crumb. So far 30 percent – no worries but Lucy can only eat so much white bread sourdough before she starts feeling guilty.

 

So we made a YW whole grain levain from the cast offs from feeding it and a small whit flour poolish to speed things along since this was not going to be a bread with a long overnight retard but one that we could get done in a day not including the 12 hour levain for the YW.

 

We came in at 43% whole grains, all in the YW levain, and we added some pistachios and walnuts in the mix to give it some taste since there was no sourdough tang to fall back on.

 

We did a large one build levain using half YW and half a mix of whole grain flours that we ground up in our trusty Krupp’s coffee grinder.  The multigrain mix was wheat, spelt, farro and rye in equal amounts. 

 

We did the usual slap and folds to develop the gluten and stretch and folds to incorporate the nuts but we then shaped the sough free form into a boule and dropped it on some parchment paper on a small Pyrex lid to proof on the heating pad.

 

We were again running out of time before this bread had to go into the oven and hoped that the poolish would eventually kick in to get the proof to 85% before hitting the heat but we only got 70% during the 3 hour final proof.

 

Then several weird things happened.  The bread would not slash with a razor, so Lucy thought about a pair of scissors but didn’t want to wash one more thing being deathly afraid of water that isn’t in her bowl.

 

Because the dough was under proofed and poorly slashed, the bottom blew out of this bread as it sprang in the oven without a hint of bloom.  No worries until the bread started to brown excessively and needed to be covered with foil for the last 10 minutes of baking.

 

We love biscuits and sausage country gravy.

Normally a bread on the small side would take about 27 minutes to get to 205 F on the inside in the mini oven but at 27 minutes it still had 10 more minutes to go - why this was so we no idea. 

 

Smoked; chicken, Anduouilli sausage and pulled pork etouffee is tough to beat.

 It did have some blisters due to (2) of Sylvia’s steaming cups and it did spring 100% when it hit the heat, still, It isn’t much of a looker on the outside but the inside was also a surprise.  With that spring I though thought it would be more open but my daughter said it was more dense than usual - compared to a 25% white bread without any nuts.

 

A tasty honey goat cheese salad from the pot garden.

The girls liked the taste since there was no sour at all and the nuts really came through since they didn’t have to compete with 10 other ingredients.  It’s not my favorite kind of bread but it did taste great for a non SD white bread with nuts.

 

The wheat will be ready to harvest soon.

Tomorrow we will crank out a 50% whole grain SD and see if that fits the bill for our sour craving a little better.  Hope the holes are better too. 

 

Yeast Water BuildBuild 1Total%
Pinch of ADY   
Yeast Water13813842.33%
Whole Multigrain Mix13813842.33%
Water505015.34%
Total27627684.66%
    
Yeast Water & Pinch of ADY Poolish % 
Flour18857.67% 
Water18857.67% 
Starter Hydration100.00%  
Levain % of Total55.29%  
    
Dough Flour % 
AP13842.33% 
Total Dough Flour13842.33% 
    
Salt61.84% 
Potato Water8927.30% 
Dough Hydration w/o starter64.49%  
Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter 84.97%  
    
Total Flour326  
Potato Water 89, Water277  
    
Total Hydration with Adds84.13%  
Total Weight680  
    
Whole Grains42.33%  
    
Add - Ins % 
VWG82.45% 
Walnuts & Pistachios5516.87% 
Total7121.78% 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Lucy came up with a recipe that includes a new process which is strange.... her being so process overloaded and all.  She Tang Zhonged part of the un-toasted Toadies, 20 g in 100g of water, then she toasted the rest of the Toadies and added them to the cooked Tang Zhong to let them soften and complete her Toady Tang Zhong.

 

You never know what Lucy will come up with next.  These Toadies contained; oat bran, wheat germ, steel cut oats, potato flakes, sesame, flax seeds and corn meal to make up the total 45 g used.  These were ground up in a mini mill to flour consistency before separating out 20 g for the Tang Zhong and 25 g to toast and add to the Tang Zhong after cooking.

 

We wanted to up the flavor, sour and whole grains of our last white bread bake and this bread at 30% whole grains, Toadies and no YW to offset the SD should fit the bill.   We were really debating putting some prunes nuts and seeds in it too but decided to go with bread that didn’t have bits in the crumb

 

Lucy did add some potato water for the liquid though since we have forgotten to add it to our last two bakes and with the potato flakes in the Tang Zhong she thought it was a good fit.  Since we were using 10%, at best protein AP with additional low gluten ingredients, we put in 10 g of VWG to get the protein up a bit.

 

The other change was that even though we built the SD levain the day before and refrigerated it overnight, we did manage to make bread the next day without retarding dough in bulk or shaped as we usually do.   We figured it would be less sour than usual but we were running out of time to get the bake done on Friday with the bun bake the day before getting the way.

 

The method was nearly the same one we have used of late with a 30 minute autolyse that included everything with the SD levain this time with the only thing held back and sprinkled on top was the salt.

 

We did 2 sets of slap and folds of 8 and 2 minutes that were dome 15 minutes apart and 3 sets of S& F’s done from the compass points twice this time on 30 minute intervals. The dough was then allowed to ferment for 1 hour before being shaped, placed in a rice floured basket and wrapped in a trash can liner.   The bread then proofed for 5 hours.  We did all of this on a heating pad since the kitchen was 68 F.

 

The razor stuck on the bread when slashing causing a nasty slash job and we should have refrigerated it for the last half hour to make slashing this wet dough easier.   But, un-molded on parchment, on a peel,  into the 550 F oven it went on the bottom of 2 stones, one above, with lava rocks in 9x13 Pyrex pan, half full of water, bubbling away on the rack below. 

 

2 minutes into the mega steam we turned the oven down to 500 F.  It stayed there for another 10 minutes when the steam came out and we turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time.  We rotated the bread 180 degrees every 5 minutes and 15 minutes after the steam came out, the bread read 207 F in the middle so we removed it to a cooling rack.

 

How did that cranberry, pear, apple, ginger pie get in there? One of our favorites!

Total baking time was 27 minutes where it browned up well, sprang OK, bloomed a little and developed some small blisters.  The crust came out of the oven crisp that went soft as it cooled.

 

The crumb was; very open with irregular holes, soft, moist and very glossy.  But the best part is the medium, tangy taste that is deep in complex flavors, a little nutty and seedy with toads in the background shining through.  This is the best tasting white SD bread we have made for a long time.

 

Had it toasted for breakfast today but can’t wait have it for dinner, with EVOO infused with basil, Parmesan and cracked black pepper, some cheeses, a salad and fruits.  Here is the lunch shot with home grown, cherry tomato covered salad, Japanese black rice, turkey stuffing, avocado, carrot, celery and red pepper sticks half a banana, a few blackberries and a fine smoked pulled pork sandwich with smoke Gouda and pepper jack cheeses.

 

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multi-grain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

3.16%

Whole Wheat

5

0

14

19

4.00%

Whole Rye

5

0

13

18

3.79%

AP

0

20

0

20

4.21%

Water

15

20

40

75

15.81%

Whole Spelt

5

0

13

18

3.79%

Total

45

40

80

165

34.77%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Starter

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

83

17.39%

 

 

 

Water

83

17.39%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

18.84%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Rye

7

1.48%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

7

1.48%

 

 

 

Whole Kamut

7

1.48%

 

 

 

Whole Farro

7

1.48%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

7

1.48%

 

 

 

Whole Oats

7

1.48%

 

 

 

AP

305

64.28%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

392

82.61%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.90%

 

 

 

Potato Water 102, Water

300

63.22%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

76.53%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

475

100.00%

 

 

 

Potato Water 102, Water

383

80.61%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

80.61%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

29.93%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

78.95%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

876

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

2.11%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45 g of Toadies and 100g of water used for Tang Zhong included in above

 

 

Don't forget the salad that goes so well with just about any meal - this one had slivered almonds on top!  Yummy with some buttered SD bread too!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After we had such luck with our last bun bake for hamburgers, that turned out to the best Lucy and I have managed to produce, we had another occasion to make some buns for some pulled pork that came from a huge 14 pound bone-in pork shoulder that we smoked for 17 hours on Sunday

 

Our last batch of buns scented with rosemary, basil, garlic and sun dried tomato here :

 YW SD ADY Poolish, Tang Zhong Rosemary, Sun Dried Tomato & Parmesan Buns

Were used as the basis for these buns. 

 

The big differences were that these buns were sourdough only - no YW or Poolish.  Aromatic seeds of; caraway, anise, fennel and coriander replaced the herbs. garlic and sun dried tomato.  We cut back on the the sugar amount and replace the butter with margarine since we were out of butter.  We upped the non fat dry milk powder, cutting the milk and added potato flakes and cream cheese.

 

The levain % was dropped from 33% to 13% and the whole grains increased from 8 to 10%.  This time we also included the Tang Zhong flour and water remaining after geletanization in the calculations for hydration that came in at 68%.

 

The other major change to the process was not to do an overnight retard of the dough.  We went straight from gluten development to ferment to shaping and final proof all on the heating pad where the final proof took 4 hours.

 

The rolls were brushed with agg and milk twice before going into the 375 F oven and they baked for 10 minutes before turning the oven down to 350 F and baking for 15 minutes more.

 

For some reason these buns did not brown up as well as the last batch even though they baked longer.  We have no idea why this was so.  They had a very nice nutty flavor and the aroma was very nice – even better than the last batch. The crumb was open soft and moist.

 

The sour tang come through but was milder than usual probably because there was no retarded.  They made some fine smoked pork shoulder holders for sure but we didn’t make enough of them to handle that much meat for sure – but we can make another batch of rolls later – a different kind too!.

 

Might as well smoke some Andouille sausage and chicken thighs with that huge pork shoulder and show a picture of the buns covering it for dinner.

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

3.41%

Whole Wheat

5

0

0

5

1.14%

Whole Rye

5

0

0

5

1.14%

AP

0

20

20

40

9.08%

Water

15

20

20

55

12.49%

Whole Spelt

5

0

0

5

1.14%

Total

45

40

40

125

28.38%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Starter

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

63

14.19%

 

 

 

Water

63

14.19%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

13.03%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Rye

10

2.27%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

10

2.27%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

10

2.27%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

12

2.72%

 

 

 

AP

336

76.28%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

378

85.81%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.82%

 

 

 

Water

263

59.70%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

69.58%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

441

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

326

73.89%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

73.89%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

10.22%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

68.16%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

959

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Honey

10

2.27%

 

 

 

Olive Oil

10

2.27%

 

 

 

Butter

42

9.53%

 

 

 

NFDMP

20

4.54%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

5

1.14%

 

 

 

Cream Cheese

42

9.53%

 

 

 

Anise, Caraway, Fennel, Coriander

4

0.91%

 

 

 

Cracked Flax, Sesame Seed

12

2.72%

 

 

 

Sugar

40

9.08%

 

 

 

Total

185

42.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garnish of sesame and chia seeds

 

 

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

From what Lucy can tell these are either calzones or strombolis depending on how Italians feel at the time or how they slice them and if anyone who knows the difference between the two is present.  I’ve decided, once again, that Lucy is nearly worthless in these matters, like most other things but we will go with her suggestion of calling them Stromzones..

  

We use the same dough for Italian focaccia and pizza interchangeably so there isn’t a difference that way for us either.  This time, to mix things up and try to cater to everyone’s personal preferences, we made the girls favorite poolish white Focaccia Romana and, for Lucy and I, our favorite sourdough multigrain Focaccia Romana for the crust portion.

 

After that everything was the same.  The Focaccia Romana portion was fresh rosemary and basil with garlic and sun dried tomato for the dough enhancements.   The filling was some mozzarella and parmesan cheese, ricotta cheese salted and peppered with an egg to bind it together.

 

The meats included very thin pepperoni, smoked hot Italian sausage and smoked chicken breast.  The caramelized veggies included red onion, button and crimini mushrooms and sautéed red peppers with some green onions and basil for color.

 

The poolish started the night before with a pinch of ADY and 100g each of water and white flour.  This was left out overnight on the counter to double and in the morning we added it to 200 g of AP, 5 g each of salt and olive oil and 116 g of  water to make a 72% hydration dough that we slapped and folded for 4 minutes…. twice – 15 minutes apart.

 

We then did 2 sets of stretch and folds where we incorporated the herbs, garlic and sun dried tomato on the first one.  It then went into the fridge for 2 and a half hours to slow it down and wait on the SD portion to catch up. 

 

The SD version started with a 3 stage build over 12 hours using 15 g of rye starter at 66% hydration, 120 g of whole grains – in this case wheat, spelt and rye in equal amounts mixed with 120 g of water.  When the levain had risen 75% after the 3rd build we refrigerated it overnight.

 

The next morning we mixed the levain with 240 g of AP, 7 g of salt, 10 g of olive oil and 160 g of water to make a 78% hydration dough.  We followed the exact same procedure as the white  poolish dough for gluten development and add in incorporation but immediately put it on the  heating pas to start fermenting and proving.- a 5 hour process.

 

The poolish dough joined the SD on the heating pad for the last 2 and a half hour of fermenting and proving.  We then divided (2) 180 g pieces of each to make the 4 what ever these turned out to be.   This left some of each dough left over - with way more multigrain SD than poolish.

 

Still working on Ians's bread for breakfast and lunch - we don't get tired of it!

 

We made a knotted roll and 4 balls out of the poolish to place in the bottom of a rice floured basket.  With the sourdough portion, we made and a large bialy shape to cover them and make a Mixed Italian Bread Chacon and set aside to proof again..

 

The tomato pot garden is just now starting to produce the bigger tomatoes to go with the cherries.

We rolled the Stromzone dough out to oval shaped rectangles slightly thicker than our ultra thin pizza crust thickness.  We then, over half the rolled out shape and leaving a 1/2” border, we piled up in layers; mozzarella, parmesan, ricotta, pizza sauce, pepperoni, smoked sausage, smoked chicken, caramelized veggies - with the green onion resting on top.

 

We folded over the other half and sealed the ‘pouch’ with rope twists of the crust where it came together.  They were then transferred to a parchment covered peel with a large dough scraper and the tops slit to let the steam out.

 

We had pre-heated the oven to 500 F and let it sit there for 20 minutes to let the top and bottom stones catch up to the oven air temperature.  As soon as the Stromzones were slid onto the bottom stone, we tuned the oven down to 425 F convection.  After 10 minutes we rotated the parchment paper 180 degrees and continued to bake for 10 more minutes.

 

We then rotated the pouches on the parchment paper 90 degrees twice - 5 minutes apart when we deemed the Stromzones done at the 30 minute mark.   We let these packets of goodness cool for 5 minutes before serving. 

 Yes, they were delicious and the ricotta made them different than our normal pizza – besides using a knife and fork to eat them!  We will make them again but since there are so much harder to make than pizza, we will probably start putting ricotta on pizza more often…. Such is life.  The Bi-color Chacon came out looking good with a little cracking where it should have.  It smells great from the outside.  Now that we have sliced it open, the crumb is soft and moist holes on the small to medium size.  The bottom SD is slightly darker than the poolish top making for a nice contrast.  The smell is phenomenal!  This bread will be used for some fine brisket using our homegrown tomatoes - tonight if  not for lunch.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Lucy decided to help the girls out with their white bread fix by making another one, a SD one this time, for them to gnaw on   To make the bread a little moiré healthy, we also added in some whole, rye, spelt and wheat.  TO increase the flavor we added in our favorite taste enhancers (that aren’t Toadies), 10 g each of corn, potato and steel cut oat and a bit of farina.

 

We had some potato water saved from making potato salad but forgot to use it for this bread.  But we did remember to use a different process for this bread.  We did a 3 stage build of the levain over 12 hours putting all the whole grains in the levain. 

 

Only 2 minutes of slap and folds just to get thing mixed up after a 20 minute autolyse where the salt was not added but the 20 g of water held back was used to incorporate it through the dough by squishing it through out finger fright before the slapping started.

 

4 set of stretch and folds from the compass points on 30 minute intervals were completed.  Once done with the S&F’s we let the dough ferment for half an hour before shaping into a batard and placing it in an oval, rice floured basket.  Then we bagged it put it outside in the AZ winter night for a cold proof that ranged from 48 F to 36 F last night.

 

In the morning, after it had risen 30%, we brought it into the kitchen for a 4 hour proof on the heating pad that we use for starters, levains and final proofs in the winter time.  We fired up Big Old Betsy for a 550 F preheat.

 

Have been eating a lot of Ian's tangy bread because it is so good for lunch sandwiches - loved the grilled cheese and Balogna

 

We put the mega steam spewing, lava rock pan, half full of water into the bottom of the oven when it hit 550F figuring it would take 15 minutes for the steam to become its mega self and for the lagging top and bottom stones to get up to ramming speed.

 

We un-molded the dough onto parchment, on a peel and them gave it two slashed with the single edge razor before sliding it into the oven’s bottom stone.  At the 2 minute mark we turned oven down t 525 f and at the 4 minute mark we lowered it again to 500 F.

 

 At the 6 minute mark, we lowered the temperature to 475 F where is stayed to the 12 minute mark when the lava rock steaming pan was removed.  The temperature was lowed to 425 F, convection this time.  Every 5 minutes we rotated the bread on the stone 90 degrees and 20 minutes into the dry bake cycle the bread hit 203 F when the oven was turned off and the door left agar until the bread hit 207 F.

 

Bread didn't make the list for sushi Wednesday with smoked salmon and ultra fine swordfish.  But it did for smoked meat Thursday of sausage chicken breast and beef ribs.

It bloomed, sprang and browned well with small blisters this time –why we have no idea and a couple of ears to hear the cooling cracking sounds.  Can’t wait to cut this bread when it cools for a hopefully sour taste and peek at the crumb.  Well, the crumb is very soft and moist with medium holes and sour.  A very nice overall white SD bread. Very tasty.

  

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

3.36%

Whole Spelt

5

15

18

38

8.51%

Whole Wheat

5

0

18

23

5.15%

Whole Rye

5

15

18

38

8.51%

Water

15

30

54

99

22.17%

Total

45

60

108

213

47.70%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multi-grain Flour Mix

107

23.85%

 

 

 

Water

107

23.85%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

25.91%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

300

67.19%

 

 

 

Corn Meal

10

2.24%

 

 

 

Farina

10

2.24%

 

 

 

Steel Cut Oats

10

2.24%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

10

2.24%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

340

76.15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.79%

 

 

 

Water

236

52.86%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

69.41%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

447

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

343

76.71%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

76.71%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

28.33%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

822

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

2.24%

 

 

 

Total

25

5.60%

 

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We are always on the lookout for a good hamburger bun recipe for our monthly hamburger feast.   We saw a post by KMIAA about some buns they baked from here http://www.food.com/recipe/japanese-tangzhong-milk-bread-water-roux-493704

That we thought looked perfect.

 

Lucy had to mess with it of course and after finding some more panettone YW and SD levain in fridge, who knew there was a ton of the stuff, she converted it from commercial yeast to a SD /YW version with a small 50 g poolish using a pinch of yeast.

 

She also put in a small amount of rosemary and sun dried tomato to mimic her pizza dough favorite and also added a ¼ C of Parmesan too to make it more like an enriched dough focaccia, if there is such a thing.  We added some potato flakes, oat and corn flour that we ground up in our mini mill because we love what they do for the flavor and rise in breads of all kinds – even in small amouns.

 

We followed the method pretty much in the beginning using the K mixer, for the ifrst time in who knows how long, to develop the dough to window pane.  We then let the dough sit on the heating pad for 2 hours before retarding it for 12 hours in the fridge to develop some flavor.

 

It rose about 50% in the fridge and the next morning it went back on the heating pad to finish its first doubling which took 3 hours.  We then knocked the dough back and formed (9) 100 g buns putting (4) in ramekins and (5) were free formed on parchment on a rimless baking sheet.  We did moosh them down to spread them out to bun width.

 

3 hours later they looked like they were at 85% proof so we started Big Old Betsy at 375 F and did the first brushing of a milk and egg wash.  When the oven beeped that it was at temperature we set the timer for 20 minutes to let the top and bottom stones come uot to temperature.

 

We brushed them again with the milk egg wash before they went onto the oven rack between the stones.   We baked them for 10 minutes then turned the oven down to 350 F, convection this time.  5 minutes later we rotated the sheet pan 180 degrees.

 

Wishing everyone a fine lunch of grilled cheese and homemade balongna and the usual fruits ans veggies.

 10 minutes later the (5) free form buns look done and they were removed to the cooking rack.  The ramekin surrounded buns were baked for 5 more minutes, removed from the containers and placed in the now off oven to crisp and color the outside for 5 minutes more before removing to the cooling rack.

 

Or this lunch with chocolate cherry bread, turkey green chili and potato with giblet gravy.

We won’t use the ramekins again since they take longer to bake and they don’t color up as well.  These buns browned and sprang well in the heat, are light as a feather and soft as could be.   No question about it, these are the best buns we have ever made of any kind, the best looking and we haven’t even cut them open yet. They smell divine and we can’t wait for our hamburger dinner which is show below. 

 

 

Sweet and white potato wedge baked fries, caramelized onions and mushoomswith smoked Gouda, pepper jack and cheddar cheese with salad stuffing.  These buns are so soft and moist on the inside and so tasty too!  Just the best all the way around. 

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

10

0

0

10

2.63%

Yeast Water

15

35

45

95

25.00%

Pinch of ADY

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Rye

5

0

0

5

1.32%

AP

30

35

45

110

28.95%

Water

25

0

0

25

6.58%

Whole Spelt

5

0

0

5

1.32%

Total

90

70

45

250

40.79%

 

 

 

 

 

 

YW SD ADY Poolish

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

125

32.89%

 

 

 

Water

125

32.89%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

33.51%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

225

59.21%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

255

67.11%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.84%

 

 

 

Milk 25 Water 75

100

26.32%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

39.22%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

380

100.00%

 

 

 

Milk 25, YW Water 125, Water 130

225

59.21%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

59.21%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

7.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

746

900 g with Tang Zhong

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Honey

10

2.63%

 

 

 

Olive Oil

10

2.63%

 

 

 

Butter

42

11.05%

 

 

 

Non Fat Dry Milk Powder

12

3.16%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

5

1.32%

 

 

 

Sugar

55

14.47%

 

 

 

Total

134

35.26%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 tsp each fresh minced; rosemary and sun dried tomato

 

 

1/4 C grated Parmesan

 

 

 

 

 

25 g of AP and 125 g of water for roux not included above.

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

David Snyder’s Pizza Post this week was the impetus Lucy needed to use up the last of the Panettone SD /YW levain.  The girls were begging for their favorite poolish Focaccia Romana crust but not throwing away levain came first.

 

My daughter’s U of A, Chain Gang little, #6, was coming through Gilbert on here way back from CA to the U of A but got caught up in traffic and had to settle for left over pizza instead of right out of the oven.

 

We did add the usual rosemary, garlic and sun dried tomato to the crust to give it that Focaccia Romana taste and we did put on the mojo de ajo before par baking for 3 minutes before the topping went on.  Our usual procedure ,3 sets of slap and folds with 3 sets of stretch and folds where the add ins were Incorporated, was in effect.  We then let the dough rest in teh frdge for 18 hours and took it out  to sit on teh heating pad for 3 hours before using it .

 

The toppings included;  pepperoni, hot Italian sausage and grilled chicken for the meats,  mozzarella  Parmesan and Pecorino for the cheeses, onion and mushroom for the caramelized portion, green red and yellow sweet pepper, Serrano, jalapeno and Poblano peppers for the hotter ones with green onion and fresh basil for the garnish on top.

 

I didn’t get  picture of the middle of the 2 pizzas but no worries – it tasted just fine according to my daughter who with my wife said this crust didn’t measure up their beloved Focaccia Romana .  Seems we have developed a tough crowd to please when it comes to pizza crust made at home.

 

I thought this one was the thinnest most crispy of all time, no bending at all and still crunchy crisp to the last piece.  The taste was not up to par since the sour was muted by the yeast water but hey - it wasn’t bad.

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

10

0

0

10

2.30%

Yeast Water

15

30

35

80

18.43%

Whole Rye

5

0

0

5

1.15%

AP

5

30

35

70

16.13%

Whole Spelt

5

0

0

5

1.15%

Total

40

60

35

170

20.74%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multi-grain Flour

85

19.59%

 

 

 

Water

85

19.59%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.57%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

White Whole Wheat

49

11.29%

 

 

 

AP

300

69.12%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

349

80.41%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.84%

 

 

 

Water

251

57.83%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

71.92%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Olive Oil

10

2.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

434

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

336

77.42%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

77.42%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

2.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

788

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 tsp each fresh minced;  garlic, rosemary and sun dried tomato

 

 Breakfast and lunch weren't too bad either with some of Friday's white bread bake for both and kjknits EM's for breakfast.

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

To start out the New Year on a different foot, we decided to do a near white bread since the girls love them the most and we were out of them.  The other added benefit is that we got to use up the last of the panettone YW SD levain left over at the same time.  Lucy hate throwing away left overs.

 

We just threw this together without a recipe thinking 75% hydration would be about right for a bread that had 23% whole grain in it but, wouldn’t you know it, right out of the New Year’s Chute we really messed up the salt by throwing in 17 g instead of 12 for the 600 g of flour.

 

Luckily, Lucy caught it and we were able to up the flour and water to get the salt down to killing levels instead of immediate drop dead ones but only after the 2nd set of stretch and folds.  Thankfully we were going to do 4 of them so the last two were there to mix in the added dough.

 

This extra dough allowed us to call this a miche instead of a boule which was great as we bake so few of them and had to think what difference baking one was compared to a boule - longer times and lower temperatures were in order.

 

With the new foot forward we decided to mix up our usual methods.  The levain was left over from New Year’s Eve, 3 days old, in the fridge the whole time.  We didn’t do an one hour autolyse for the white flours as we usually would and just mixed everything together and let it sit for 20 minutes before starting a very short 1 minute slap and fold session to get everything thoroughly combined.

 

The 4 S&F’s were done 30 minutes apart where the gluten was developed very well and the dough was tighter than usual for 75% hydration white bread.   I thought maybe the Gold Medal AP flour I was using was thirstier than my usual store brand variety but I didn’t add any mire water even though Lucy said I would regret it later.

 

Once the slap and folds were done we let the dough sit on the counter for an hour to ferment before pre-shaping it into a round, final shaping and placing it in a basket inside a trash can liner to proof 40 minutes on the counter before being retarded for 8 hours.

 

The next morning we took it out of the fridge and let it warm up on the counter for 2 hours before baking.  We used two Pyrex pans full of lava rocks and half full of water for the mega steam.   We put the pans in the bottom of the oven when Big Old Betsy said she was at 550 F.  15 minutes later the dough was un-molded onto a parchment covered peel, slashed in a square and slid onto the bottom stone.

 

Two minutes later we turned the oven sown to 500 F and then two minutes after that we turned it down to 475 F where it stayed until the 15 minute mark.  Under steam the miche really sprang well, bloomed, blistered and puffed itself up very well nearly blowing its square top right off. 

T^his bread was perfect for sopping up the turkey green chili, chili from the bottom of the bowl.  Yummy!

We then removed the steam and turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time and rotated the bread 90 degrees on the stone every 6minutes until the bread reach 205 F on the inside – about 25 minutes later or 40 minutes total baking time.  The bread browned well we let the crust crisp on the stone with the oven off and door ajar for 8 minutes before removing it to the cooling rack.

As we were getting ready to cut the miche, a package arrived from Max who sent 2 of Ian's batards all the way from Long Island!.  As you can see, his are no white breads and the the crusts are a deep mahagony color - just the way we like it.and they smell terrific too - a good sign!  Those three loaves make for one fine bread ensemble photo just beautiful and a tough to beat.  Can't wait to finish this post and cut them open to have a taste.  It is such fun to actually get to taste breads made by other Fresh Lofians and see how their flour combinations compare to your own . 

 

This is one fine looking miche with a very crunch crust when it came out of the oven.  Yeah, I know it only had 7% whole grains but that doesn’t include the WWW which is not a whole grain even though it says White Whole Wheat in the title.   The crumb came out not as open as we thought it would be and there was no sour as YW and SD combo breads tend to be neutral in taste.  The crumb was soft and moist and made a great bologna sandwich  for lunch.  Since the girls aren't big SD fans, they should like this bread a lot!  What a nice bread to start the New Year out on......Happy New Year to all.

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

1.83%

Yeast Water

15

30

40

85

10.35%

Whole Rye

5

0

0

5

0.61%

AP

5

30

40

75

9.13%

Whole Spelt

5

0

0

5

0.61%

Total

45

60

40

185

12.17%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multi-grain Flour

93

11.26%

 

 

 

Water

93

11.26%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

12.69%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

White Whole Wheat

51

6.21%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

51

6.21%

 

 

 

AP

627

76.32%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

729

88.74%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

17

2.07%

 

 

 

Water

527

64.15%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

72.29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

822

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

620

75.41%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

75.41%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

23.72%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,458

 

 

 

 

 

New Year's Day Dinner - Shrimp Kabobs

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

After last year’s total and complete fiasco using origami panettone moulds made out of parchment paper where the panettone fell out of the mould onto the floor while cooling upside down, we decided to bake it in a large soufflé pan this year.

 

We used Susan’s Wild Yeast formula found here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2007/12/07/panettone/ 

 

Lucy cut the recipe in half, dropped the commercial yeast and used the same amount of YW levain in its place.  So this is another SD /YW combo levain panettone attempts.  We also added 40 more grams of snockered fruits to the mix that included, candied pineapple, lemon and orange peel, green and red cherries, raisins, cranberries, prunes apricot and citron.  She also chucked in 100g of mini chocolate chips. 

 

Because the fruits were so wet with bourbon, amaretto, limoncello, arancello, dark rum and brandy the final 5 sets of stretch and folds were done 15 minutes apart and extra bench flour was used, around 50g, to get the dough to not be a sticky mess and actually begin to hold together even though still very wet.

 

We let it final proof on the counter for 10 hours before moving it to the heating pad and 80 F for another 3 hours.  We used Susan’s glaze for the topping and chucked it in the 350 F oven with a stone above and below the rack where the panettone landed.

 

Because the panettone was so big at 1,100 g, we baked it to 190 F instead of 185 F,   It took and hour to bake to the handsome brown color.  The spring was very good and the panettone doubled in height in the oven from 2 below the rim of the pan to 2 “  above the rim of the pan.

 

It smells terrific as it cools on the counter.  Lucy will post the crumb shots after it cools – with no hanging upside down this year.  The crumb is the most moist, shreddable and soft one that Lucy had ever managed to chomp down on.  This is just delicious through and through.  No more store bought panettone that is half a s good ever again.  It is such a relief to make a comeback from last year's 2 panettone disasters that fell out on to the floor while cooling upside down.

This one never though about deflating so I see no need for hanging them upside down and no need for expensive forms either.  This was a 7 1/2 "x 4" souffle pan but they could just as easily be baked in small cocktail or larger full loaf tins too.  I love panettone,,,,, especially spread with marmalade and whipped cream on top....or made into French toast.  Thanks to Susan at the Wild Yeatst for the formula and methods.

Happy New Year to all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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