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News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Taiwan Invents Square Watermelon <b>Bread</b> That Is Delicious And <b>...</b>

Google Blog Search - June 25, 2015 - 8:35am
In one of the weirdest and most confusing food mash-ups we've ever seen, a Taiwanese bakery has invented a loaf of bread that looks just like the equally bizarre square watermelons popular in Japan.
Categories: Blogs

Gawker, Vox Media break bread at Cannes - Capital New York

Google News Bread Feed - June 25, 2015 - 7:50am

Capital New York

Gawker, Vox Media break bread at Cannes
Capital New York
On Wednesday night, Vox Media and Gawker Media, ostensible competitors in the digital media industry, linked arms to hold a—we're assuming—glitzy dinner at the Italian restaurant Da Mimmo in Cannes, France. The dinner was timed to coincide with the ...

Categories: News

Taiwan's watermelon bread will delight your senses, confuse your tastebuds - RocketNews24

Google News Bread Feed - June 25, 2015 - 4:35am

RocketNews24

Taiwan's watermelon bread will delight your senses, confuse your tastebuds
RocketNews24
Well a new challenger has appeared: watermelon bread. Yes, that's right, watermelon bread. It's green on the outside, red on the inside, and even has black “seeds” sprinkled throughout. Your taste buds will never be more confused, or more excited, than ...

Categories: News

Whimsical Ghibli Studio-style animation appears in bread commercials【Videos】 - RocketNews24

Google News Bread Feed - June 24, 2015 - 11:08pm

RocketNews24

Whimsical Ghibli Studio-style animation appears in bread commercials【Videos】
RocketNews24
Francois's most recent Slow Bread commercial started airing on May 7, but as of now the company's commercials can only be seen on TV in Fukuoka. Despite this, the company seems to have hit upon a successful theme and has so far received an ...

and more »
Categories: News

Throwback Thursday: Caramel Bread Pudding from Benjamin's - The Providence Journal

Google News Bread Feed - June 24, 2015 - 9:16pm

The Providence Journal

Throwback Thursday: Caramel Bread Pudding from Benjamin's
The Providence Journal
Back in 2002, the bread pudding was one of the top sellers on the dinner menu, said Diane Benjamin, wife of George Benjamin who founded the restaurant. The recipe was shared with Journal readers. It was the creation of pastry chef Robert Croteau, who ...

Categories: News

Why Bread Will Taste Different in 2050 - Munchies_ Food by VICE

Google News Bread Feed - June 24, 2015 - 4:15pm

Why Bread Will Taste Different in 2050
Munchies_ Food by VICE
But less often mentioned in the Big Sustainability Conversation is one of the biggest staples of the Western diet: bread. Good ol' bread—that which makes a breakfast sandwich, or toast, or weed bruschetta. While we all see the problems with eating ...

Categories: News

Banana bread recipe can be gluten and dairy free — really - Kansas City Star (blog)

Google News Bread Feed - June 24, 2015 - 11:42am

Kansas City Star (blog)

Banana bread recipe can be gluten and dairy free — really
Kansas City Star (blog)
Rather than add to my ever-growing stash of frozen smoothie components or leave them out so the fruit flies could have an unsupervised party, I decided that a delicious loaf of banana bread was long overdue to fill my kitchen with its sweet, buttery aroma.

Categories: News

Why bread gets stale, and why that can be a good thing - Los Angeles Times

Google News Bread Feed - June 24, 2015 - 9:30am

Los Angeles Times

Why bread gets stale, and why that can be a good thing
Los Angeles Times
When it comes to bread, staling is one of a cook's worst enemies. Within only a couple of days, it can turn a perfect loaf into lead — and refrigerating that bread only makes things worse. But staling also can be a great help. Fried rice? Rice or ...

Categories: News

Square Watermelons Turned into...<b>Bread</b> - Kotaku

Google Blog Search - June 24, 2015 - 2:00am
If bread that looks like, uh, bread isn't enough for you, how about bread that looks like watermelon? Throughout Asia, melons are very much a summer food. And in Taiwan, you can eat “Watermelon Toast.” According to Pouch ...
Categories: Blogs

Locally baked bread is too good to let it go to waste - Columbia Daily Tribune

Google News Bread Feed - June 23, 2015 - 12:02pm

Columbia Daily Tribune

Locally baked bread is too good to let it go to waste
Columbia Daily Tribune
Several years ago, I worked for a couple of different bakers at farmers markets, selling bread and fielding questions, which were most often about storage. What folks wanted to know was how to keep bread fresh for as long as possible — how best to ...

and more »Google News
Categories: News

Climate Change Could Shrink Bread Loaves: Study - International Business Times

Google News Bread Feed - June 23, 2015 - 11:42am

International Business Times

Climate Change Could Shrink Bread Loaves: Study
International Business Times
A team of researchers claims that climate change could one day affect the size of a loaf of bread. The researchers have linked the increasing level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to the amount of protein in the flour used to produce the daily staple.
Climate Change Could Lead To Smaller Bread, Experts SayTech Times
Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels make for poor bread loavesInternational Business Times UK
Latest victim of global warming: loaves of bread will be smaller in future ...Telegraph.co.uk
ZME Science -The Independent -Daily Mail
all 12 news articles »
Categories: News

Charlotte's Joe Lovallo is at home with baking bread - Charlotte Observer

Google News Bread Feed - June 23, 2015 - 9:36am

Charlotte Observer

Charlotte's Joe Lovallo is at home with baking bread
Charlotte Observer
He's an average Joe who likes to bake. But Joe Lovallo's bread is anything but average. Working out of his home near Matthews, Lovallo makes dough every night and bakes every morning before work – pointed baguettes with perfect razor slashes, wider ...

Categories: News

Crock Pot Nutella Swirl Bread

Artisan Bread in 5 - June 23, 2015 - 8:47am

Last weekend I lived the ultimate bread bakers’ dream. Thanks to my friends at Red Star Yeast I travelled to the heart of wheat country in Kansas and had the great honor of judging the National Festival of Breads baking contest. The contestants submitted their recipes and were chosen from hundreds of bread bakers from across the country. Eight women came to Manhattan, KS and baked in a theatre-style kitchen in front of about 1500 bread lovers. They deserve a prize for that alone. The breads were all amazing, but one by Lisa Keys of Good Grief Cooks was the one that stood out to all the judges. Her Smokehouse Cranberry Cheese Bread had a combination of flavors, texture and beauty made this the clear winner. You can read all about the contest (you should consider entering for the next one), the contestants and their winning recipes at the National Festival of Breads.

Another absolutely gorgeous loaf that was baked for us was a chocolate swirl bread. I’ve recreated that idea with our Whole Wheat Brioche dough and a swirl of Nutella. It is healthy and decadent all at the same time and it’s baked in a crock pot. I turned to my crock pot when I turned on the AC for the first time yesterday and I really didn’t want to heat up the kitchen by cranking up the oven. The crock pot is ideal for a bread like this, since it fits the shape and we want a soft crust. The result was perfect.

1 1/2 pounds brioche or challah. The doughs from The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day or Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day or Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day will work equally well.

2/3 cup nutella

Roll out the dough to 1/8-inch thick rectangle and spread the nutella over the dough.

Roll the dough into a log and pinch the seam shut.

Cut the dough in half down the length of the log.

Twist the dough into a rope.

Coil the twisted rope to form a tight round loaf.

Tuck the ends under the loaf.

Place the loaf on a piece of parchment paper and set into the Crock-Pot. (No need to let the loaf rest or rise before you put it in the crock pot and start it up. Super FAST and EASY!) Place the COVER on the crock pot and turn to high. Let the bread bake for about 1 hour, but this may take slightly shorter or longer, depending on the machine.

The loaf is done when you touch the top and it feels set and no longer mushy and raw.

Remove from the crock pot. Allow to cool before eating. (I have to say that, but we couldn’t wait and ate it warm).

Enjoy other Twisted Breads and Crock Pot Breads:

Onion Poppy Seed Twist Bread – this could also be made in a crock pot

Cinnamon Brioche Wreath – try this in the crock pot too

Simple Crock Pot Bread

Pita bread helps researchers steal encryption keys - Naked Security

Google News Bread Feed - June 23, 2015 - 8:10am

Naked Security

Pita bread helps researchers steal encryption keys
Naked Security
A team of Israeli security researchers at Tel Aviv University have developed a novel way to steal encryption keys using a cheap radio sniffer and a piece of pita bread. While the risk posed by the tempting snack is nothing new, the cost and size of the ...
How to steal encryption keys (using radio waves and pita bread)We Live Security (blog)
Hackers steal data using gadget inside pitta breadBBC News
Your Encryption Keys Could Be Soon Stolen By A Pita BreadTech Times
TechRadar -BGR
all 13 news articles »
Categories: News

Pita <b>bread</b> helps researchers steal encryption keys | Naked Security

Google Blog Search - June 23, 2015 - 8:07am
Instead of thousands of pounds and a large room, a would-be pita bread hacker would probably get enough change from a hundred pounds to pop out and buy a whole pack of unleavened bread and a lunchbox to store ...
Categories: Blogs

Visit Panera Bread This Week To Help Fight Childhood Hunger In Oklahoma - news9.com KWTV

Google News Bread Feed - June 23, 2015 - 7:59am

news9.com KWTV

Visit Panera Bread This Week To Help Fight Childhood Hunger In Oklahoma
news9.com KWTV
OKLAHOMA CITY -. Panera Bread is partnering with the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma to fight childhood hunger. According to the company, from June 22 through June 26, Panera guests can support the Regional Food Bank's Food for Kids programs by ...

Categories: News

Bread and Butter: A New Café and Wine Bar by the Owner of Shokudo - HONOLULUMagazine.com

Google News Bread Feed - June 22, 2015 - 5:52pm

HONOLULUMagazine.com

Bread and Butter: A New Café and Wine Bar by the Owner of Shokudo
HONOLULUMagazine.com
Bread and Butter is Hide Sakurai's third venture. He's the man behind the ever-popular Shokudo, and the not-so-popular upscale Mexican restaurant Búho. Like the latter, Bread and Butter is still trying to find its audience. When we go on a weekend ...

Categories: News

Bread of Heaven food truck makes inaugural journey, serves more than 400 - wivb.com

Google News Bread Feed - June 22, 2015 - 4:58pm

wivb.com

Bread of Heaven food truck makes inaugural journey, serves more than 400
wivb.com
BUFFALO, N.Y. (WIVB) — For the first time, the Bread of Heaven food truck distributed meals to the hungry and less fortunate in western New York. The truck is a mission of the True Bethel Baptist Church. It has the capability of feeding the hungry on ...

and more »
Categories: News

Firebrand Bakery in Oakland - SFGate

Google News Bread Feed - June 22, 2015 - 4:15pm

SFGate

Firebrand Bakery in Oakland
SFGate
A loaf of bread is pulled from the oven at Firebrand Artisan Breads in Oakland. photo_prev_inline|slideshow-gallery-112138|slideshow-gallery-112138|0. photo_next_inline|slideshow-gallery-112138|slideshow-gallery-112138|0. Matt Kreutz, owner of ...

Categories: News

Buckwheat Blast in Brittany

Farine - June 22, 2015 - 8:45am
I guess I could say we went on a buckwheat bender a few weeks ago while visiting family in Brittany. Our niece Anne-Laure - who lives near Quimper in Pays bigouden  - shares my love of blé noir (literally "black wheat") as buckwheat is often called in France and, to our delight, she wove it into almost every meal, be it at local crêperies when we lunched out or at home where she prepared local specialties for us. If that wasn't enough, in between our several buckwheat encounters, she took us sightseeing. I hadn't been back to Brittany since my kids were, well, kids, and I had forgotten about beautiful it is. She led us for long walks along the shore...
...to old seaside villages...
   ...and around the countryside where the fields were abloom with flowers of all kinds (except for buckwheat for which we were too early)...
Originally from Asia but grown in Brittany since the fifteenth century from seeds brought back by returning Crusaders, buckwheat is in the same family as sorrel or rhubarb. While it isn't a cereal and contains no gluten, it is rich in fibers, amino-acids and antioxydants and therefore very much appreciated for its nutritional value. Seeded in late spring (to avoid frost which it doesn't tolerate), it is harvested from mid-September to mid-October.
In the Brittany of yesteryear, it was part of a subsistence diet together with pork or beef fat and whatever meat or fish was occasionally available. Poor local farmers and fishermen often lacking the necessary ingredients and/or fuel to make bread, used to make a sort of buckwheat mush which they boiled inside a linen bag alongside bacon or meat scraps, a recipe known as kig-ha-farz (literally "far in a bag").  In subsequent variations, the buckwheat mush was thickened in a pot over the fire, then poured into a dish and baked in an oven. It then become a far, as in far breton (a popular dessert often made with dried plums). Today far breton is usually made with wheat flour.
To fully understand why buckwheat was so readily adopted back in the old days, one should also remember that, by law, farmers bringing wheat or other grains to the miller had to pay a tax to the local lord for the use of the mill not to mention a percentage to the miller as well as a tithe to the church. Buckwheat, le blé du pauvre (the poor man's wheat) was exempt of such dues and could legally be milled on demand at home in rudimentary wooden mills. Moreover its flowers were extremely attractive to bees, which made for bumper crops of fragrant honey. On the downside, its leaves were toxic to cattle and couldn't be used as straw or hay. Interestingly, popular belief held that blé noir was a creation of Satan while wheat, which produces white flour, was credited to God.
Had our stay in Brittany be longer, we would certainly have seen many more examples of the use of buckwheat in cooking and baking but because of our time constraints, we experienced buckwheat in four of its avatars only: fish and chips, galettes, kouign-amann and farz. We didn't make it to any of the amazing bakers I had heard of in the region (they were either inland or further north) and I saw no trace of buckwheat bread at the regular bakeries we saw along the way. Which means I am already making a list for next time! Meanwhile here is a recap of our buckwheat encounters.

Buckwheat fish and chips
Anne-Laure had suggested we meet in Concarneau's ville close (walled city) where she knew of a little restaurant featuring "fish and chips breizh." Breizh is Bretton for Brittany and in a food context, it is often a strong hint that buckwheat is around. She was curious to find out and once she told me about it, so was I.
   I can't say that I actually tasted the buckwheat but the fish was extremely fresh (any fresher, it would have jumped on the plate by itself) and the outer layer of the fillets was arrestingly crunchy: they had been perfectly deep-fried in a finely textured batter. Anne-Laure asked the owner what percentage of buckwheat she used but she wouldn't say. It had taken her a while to develop the recipe and, understandably, she didn't feel like jumpstarting the process for the competition. Coming from the United States, what struck me the most is how small (three pieces) the serving was compared to what we are used to back home...


Buckwheat kouign-amann
After lunch we made for Le Guilvinec, a major fishing hub where our niece had said we would watch the fishing ships come in and buy fresh seafood for dinner.
But on the way over, we glimpsed a road sign advertising a buckwheat kouign-amann. Since kouign-amann (Bretton for "butter cake") is usually made with wheat flour, we were intrigued enough to stop.
The legend says that the cake was invented in the late nineteenth century by a Bretton baker who found himself one day short on flour but long on butter and sugar. I was amazed to see how different the cake we got was from the leavened laminated pastries generally known as kouign-amann. So was it the local version of the real thing or a tourist trap? As we were leaving, we saw a passel of silver-haired seniors exit a bus and head determinedly towards the store (which offered souvenirs as well as local bakery items), so who knows? In any case, such as it was, our buckwheat kouign-amman had a pleasant nutty flavor and if you could get over the amount of butter and sugar (the Man clearly had no problem with that), it was a lovely dessert, more flavorful (and actually less sweet) than the wheat version (the person behind the counter kindly had kindly let us sample both).

Farz en sac (literally mush in a bag)
In our honor, Anne-Laure decided to make far en sac one night.  Since we were out and about all day, she didn't have time to make a true kig-ha-farz, so she decided to boil the farz on its own in salted water seasoned with seaweed and to serve it alongside fillets of lieu jaune (pollock) gently cooked over a bed of sautéed leeks. She already had the bag (which she had fashioned out of an old linen dish towel), she had buckwheat flour, she had sea salt, she had eggs, she had cream and butter, and she had not one but two identical recipes (from the back of the bags of flour). We were in business!
(Anne-Laure used two different flours because she had some flour leftover from another recipe).
I found a gold mine of information on farz in Fars bretons et Kig-Ha-Farz by Patrick Hervé. While researching his book, he had talked to many elders (some of whom were born in the 1890s) who told him that there was no vegetables in kig-ha-farz until after the French Revolution and that the authentic recipe actually called only for meat and buckwheat. The farz was also sometimes boiled separately in water, with a bit of lard added for taste. When a household had no dedicated bag, the homemaker would either use a dish towel (as Anne-Laure did) or sacrifice an old shirt and use the sleeves, seams on the outside, (one sleeve for wheat and one for buckwheat). After use, the bag was rinsed out, never washed. Fully seasoned, the best ones were kept in the same family for generations. Some seniors recalled that the boiled buckwheat mush sometimes became so compact that it could be sliced and that leftovers were pan-fried the following day. Others said it should crumble when taken out of the bag so that it can be rolled almost as fine as couscous. Differences in texture may be due to cooking times and to the various ingredients used or skipped (poor families sometimes had nothing more than buckwheat and water, sometimes milk, at their disposal). It'd be interesting to experiment. As it was, Anne-Laure's  farz was of the crumbly sort and the perfect foil for the delicate taste of the just caught fish. Merci, Anne-Laure!!! It was a memorable dinner.

Galettes de sarrasin (buckwheat crêpes)
On our last night, our niece took out her billig (crêpe maker) and made galettes.
Since we had been on a steady diet of buckwheat crêpes whenever we lunched out, she first checked with us to make sure we hadn't been over-crêped. We had not. Actually we had heard so much about Anne-Laure's galettes through the family grapevine that we would have been disappointed to leave Brittany without having any. So once again she whipped out her buckwheat flour, took an egg out of the fridge, measured milk and water, and went for it.
I wish I had taken more pictures but the minute Anne-Laure put the first galette on the table,  all thoughts of reporting left my mind. Let us just say that of all our buckwheat encounters during this trip, galettes de blé noir were my absolute favorites. Especially Anne-Laure's... I could practically live on those! And in case you are wondering about the technique involved in using a bilig, here is an informative video from the Krampouz website:

It looks simple but it isn't. As I discovered from experience, working a bilig is a lot like getting into Carnegie Hall, it requires a lot of practice. But then what doesn't?

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