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Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day
Updated: 8 hours 19 min ago

Mardi Gras King Cake

February 19, 2020 - 9:08pm

Mardi Gras King Cake, named for the three kings who came to bring gifts to Jesus, is traditionally served during Mardi Gras in New Orleans and throughout the South. Not only is it decorated with the colors of the festival, but it also has a hidden trinket in the dough. I’ve used an almond, but in New Orleans bakers often use a ceramic or plastic doll to represent the baby Jesus. The person who gets the slice with the trinket is responsible for making the King Cake the following year.

There are many versions of this sweet bread, depending on the traditions of different families. Our version from Holiday and Celebration Bread in Five Minutes a Day is made with Brioche dough which has nutmeg, cinnamon, and raisins added into it.  The dough can be Braided and/or formed into a Couronne (crown shape) as I have done here. Some bakers even use a cream cheese and praline filling, but we went with a more traditional filling.

King Cake:

1 1/2 – pounds Brioche Dough from any of our books (page 189 ABin5) or  (Whole Wheat Brioche page 275 HBin5) or (Gluten-Free Brioche page ) or (page 65 Holiday and Celebration Bread in Five Minutes a Day)

1/2 cup sugar

1 teaspoon grated nutmeg

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Zest of 1 lemon

1 cup raisins (optional)

1 almond, bean or Plastic King Cake Babies for trinket

Glaze:

2 cups powdered sugar

2 tablespoons heavy cream

1 drop orange or almond extract

Purple, green and gold Colored Sugars, sprinkles or dragees

To make the King Cake:

Preheat oven to 350° and prepare a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Roll the brioche dough into a 1/4-inch thick rectangle. Cover the dough with the nutmeg, lemon zest and citron.

* For G-F bakers: you will want to roll the dough out between sugar covered Silpat and plastic wrap, so it will not stick to the surface.

Roll the dough up around the fillings and fold the dough over itself.

*For G-F bakers: you will want to roll the ingredients into the dough and then immediately for the dough into a circle (see pictures below), this dough will not allow you to knead the ingredients in.

Knead (Yes, I used the dreaded word) the dough for about 1 minute to mix the fillings into the dough.

Form a log with the dough and stretch it out into a long rope.

Join the two ends and let the dough rest on a cookie sheet, covered with parchment, for 1 hour (1 1/2 hours for whole wheat brioche). Push the trinket under the dough. Brush the top with egg wash and bake for about 35-40 minutes.

Cool the bread completely before decorating.

Make the glaze:

Mix the powdered sugar, heavy cream and extract until smooth. Drizzle over the top of the cooled bread. 

Sprinkle the colored sugar over the glaze before it has a chance to set.

Enjoy!

The post Mardi Gras King Cake appeared first on Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day.

Soft Pretzels – (How-to Video on Shaping the Dough)

January 17, 2020 - 2:26pm

When I was growing up in Connecticut I’d spend a fair amount of time in New York City. Every time I’d get off the train I’d get a pretzel from a cart outside the station. That, and a trip to the Papaya King, were enough to get me through the day. It was a cheap, tasty and filling snack for a teenager.

Part of the characteristics of that perfect New York pretzel is the way they look. Philadelphia has a pretzel culture too, but you’d never confuse it with its northern cousin, due to the shape. Philly has figure-8 knots and New York has … pretzel shape. Admittedly, it’s nostalgia that makes me partial to the New York version. And you really should serve these homemade soft pretzels with mustard to complete the experience. I like a grainy mustard and that is just not at all traditional. Oh well.

Homemade Soft Pretzels

Pretzel Dough from The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day:

3 cups lukewarm water

1 tablespoon Platinum Yeast

1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt

2 tablespoons Non-diastatic malt powder (or sugar)

6 1/2 cups (2 pounds) bread flour – (this will make a stronger dough and holds up to boiling the pretzels. BUT, I’m not going to boil these pretzels, so feel free to use all-purpose flour for this recipe. If you want to boil the pretzels, be sure to use the bread flour.)

For top of the Homemade Soft Pretzels:

2 cups water

2 tablespoons baking soda – (We didn’t use lye, because it is a chemical that few people will have on hand and it is a bit risky to use. If you are committed to the authentic pretzel you really will want to find some lye and be very careful when using it, there are some pretty significant warnings on the label.)

1 tablespoon sugar

Pretzel Salt

If you’ve used bread flour, you’ll notice it is dryer than our master recipe (which uses all-purpose flour), and this is by design, so that the dough will hold up when dipped in the baking soda solution.

Because of the bread flour and the Platinum yeast, you’ll see lots of air holes in the dough. Refrigerate and use the dough over the next 14 days.

When you are ready to make your pretzels:

Preheat the oven to 375°F (this is a touch hotter than we say in the book. I did this because my pretzels are bigger and I liked the color, crispness and interior with the hotter oven.)

I’ve made larger pretzels than we make in our book, but you can make them any size you like. These are about 6-ounces each. If you take 2-pounds out of the bucket (about half the dough) and divide it into 5 pieces, you’ll come up with about the right amount of dough.

Form each piece into smooth balls. Cover them and let them rest for about 30 minutes to relax. This will help in your shaping.

Here is a video that shows how to get the right shape. I made a simple pretzel and one with an extra twist:

(Thank you to my son, Henri, for shooting and editing the video. So great to have a teenager in the house.)

After you shape your pretzel, place them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, cover them and let them rest for about 20 to 30 minutes.

While they are resting, mix the water, baking soda and sugar, stirring until the soda and sugar has dissolved completely.  Brush the pretzels with the baking soda solution.

Sprinkle with pretzel salt or coarse salt. You can slash with a Lame or knife along the bottom or leave them as is, both are a fine look.

Bake with steam for about 20 to 30 minutes, or until nicely browned.

Let cool on a rack.

Serve with your favorite mustard or with nothing at all.

Note: Red Star Yeast (Lesaffre Corp) is a sponsor of BreadIn5, LLC and its promotional activities, and supplied yeast for recipe testing.

The post Soft Pretzels – (How-to Video on Shaping the Dough) appeared first on Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day.